prime minister – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 21:09:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png prime minister – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 Congress rivals attempt to divide society along caste and religious lines https://helviti.com/congress-rivals-attempt-to-divide-society-along-caste-and-religious-lines/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 12:58:33 +0000 https://helviti.com/congress-rivals-attempt-to-divide-society-along-caste-and-religious-lines/ Congress Secretary General Priyanka Gandhi Vadra on Thursday accused rival parties of trying to divide society on the basis of caste and religion and said that because of this the real problems of people like l inflation and unemployment are ignored. Targeting the ruling BJP, she said it was the government’s duty to alleviate the […]]]>

Congress Secretary General Priyanka Gandhi Vadra on Thursday accused rival parties of trying to divide society on the basis of caste and religion and said that because of this the real problems of people like l inflation and unemployment are ignored.

Targeting the ruling BJP, she said it was the government’s duty to alleviate the problems of the public, but in Uttar Pradesh the problem of stray cattle was created by government policies.

Addressing a public meeting in Sonbhadra, Vadra said: “Elections are a time (for the public) to determine which party should come to power to serve the people in the next five years. However, parties like BJP, BSP and Samajwadi Party try to divide society along caste and religion. Because of this, people’s real problems like inflation, lack of jobs, and lack of amenities are overlooked.

“The greatest strength of a democracy is the vote, which can make or destroy your future. Voters need to be aware and vote for people who are ready to work for you around the clock,” she said.

The Congress leader said her party granted forest rights to tribals but they are now being bulldozed off their lands. She also mentioned the Umbha massacre in July 2019 in which 11 tribals were killed and accused the administration and the police of inaction.

Vadra blamed the policies of the Uttar Pradesh government led by Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath for the problem of stray cattle in the state.

“It is the duty of those in power to alleviate the problems of the people, but in UP the problem of stray livestock has been caused by the policies of the government. Our government in Chhattisgarh has managed to solve this problem,” said the leader of Congress.

Vadra said the BJP government has not provided people with jobs for the past five years and is only promising to do so now when the elections are held.

The BJP says it gives people a free ration and deposits money into their accounts, she said.

“You have to understand the mindset that they (the BJP) will never give you jobs. The government has done nothing to promote agriculture and small industries which generate a lot of jobs. on the other hand, they haven’t even given government jobs for the past five years and are now promising you jobs,” she added.

Vadra reiterated his party’s election promises.

“We will solve the problem of stray cattle and provide compensation of Rs 3,000 per acre in case your crop is destroyed by stray cattle. We will buy sugar cane for Rs 400 per quintal. To generate employment for women , we will ensure 25% reservation in the recruitment of women in the police,” she said.

“Eight lakh jobs will be provided for women,” she said.

Vadra said Congress will ensure that any officer who fails to register an FIR in a case related to a crime against women is suspended, free travel for women on government buses, and provides free cell phones and scooters to girls.

The Congress will also provide loans of Rs 5 lakh to those who wish to set up their own business, she said.

Addressing a rally in Chandauli, Vadra said: “Issues like inflation, lack of development and mismanagement do not discriminate on the basis of caste and religion. Yet the BJP, the BSP and the SP only talk about caste and community to divide people for the vote bank.”

“Politicians understand that by keeping young people unemployed they can be led astray and driven to promote violent political ideology,” she said.

Vadra said his father, former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, always meets the villagers and works for their development.

“But the BJP leaders don’t understand the importance of development because they haven’t done anything for the independence of this country,” she said.

“BJP leaders have become so emboldened that their sons are trampling farmers under their vehicles,” she added, referring to allegations against Union Minister Ajay Kumar Mishra’s son, Ashish Mishra, in the statement. Lakhimpur Kheri case.

Vadra alleged that the BJP-led government is neglecting the common man and farmers of the country and making laws to benefit Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s industrial friends.

She also warned voters against the mistake of giving the BJP a majority in Uttar Pradesh.

“PM says BJP gave you free ration and asks for votes. This is the bare minimum a government should do. Instead government should give jobs,” she said. declared.

Voting will take place in Sonbhadra and Chandauli in the seventh and final phase of the Uttar Pradesh Assembly polls on March 7.

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The role of religion in the Ottawa protest https://helviti.com/the-role-of-religion-in-the-ottawa-protest/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 19:10:18 +0000 https://helviti.com/the-role-of-religion-in-the-ottawa-protest/ The end of the “freedom convoy” in Ottawa has already sparked a lot of soul-searching – how could this have happened? One of the topics that will certainly be discussed is the role that the Christian faith has played in the manifestation. There were a lot of Christians in Ottawa — you could see it […]]]>

The end of the “freedom convoy” in Ottawa has already sparked a lot of soul-searching – how could this have happened?

One of the topics that will certainly be discussed is the role that the Christian faith has played in the manifestation.

There were a lot of Christians in Ottawa — you could see it on protest signs and hear it in media interviews. There were many stories of prayer services and Christian preachers addressing the crowds and an American Christian crowdfunding website helped funnel money to the cause.

As a CBC report concluded: “The Christian faith – with an overtly evangelical twist – flows like an undercurrent through Ottawa’s freedom convoy.

The situation puts me in a bind. Although I watched the protests with horror, I also write, teach and speak regularly about the positive contribution that faith, especially my Christian faith, can make to public discourse.

So, in response, allow me to offer several observations.

First, I can’t criticize someone for having strong religious beliefs. As a person of faith, I recognize that this is part of their identity. People are frustrated and scared, and these are often the circumstances in which you most often turn to God.

The situation is also far from black and white. Governments have made their share of mistakes in handling the pandemic and are not above criticism. I have tried to think of the protesters with compassion and take their views seriously.

However, I have also held the protesters accountable for their actions – especially those who use Christianity as justification for what they have done.

I think it is legitimate to wonder how Christians can be associated with something that has gone far beyond a peaceful protest and has changed the lives of many Ottawa residents. How could they ally themselves with individuals who had ties to white supremacist groups? How can they explain the hatred that was everywhere – symbolized by the blasphemous placards condemning the Prime Minister?

The protest was apparently about personal freedom and while that is certainly something Christianity recognizes, it is not its most important message. In my view, the central message of Christianity is summed up in the call to love God and to “do unto others as you would have them do unto you” – even the stranger and those we dislike.

Although I suspect many of the Christians at the protest were anti-abortion, there were plenty of signs reading “My body, my choice” – an obvious take-off on a pro-choice slogan. The anti-abortion people I have met recognize that a woman has rights over her body. They argue, however, that these rights must be balanced against one’s responsibility to others, namely the unborn child.

Isn’t the principle the same here? We certainly all have rights when it comes to vaccines or wearing masks, but shouldn’t those rights be balanced against our responsibilities to our fellow citizens, especially the elderly and those with health problems?

Some will say that religious faith is too divisive to be welcome in our public debates.

On the contrary. Much of the Christian message is about building bridges to others – even your enemies. There is a constant call for humility and recognition of the dignity of others.

Perhaps the fundamental problem is that these days Christians on all sides in public policy discussions too often fail to demonstrate this aspect of their faith.

John Milloy, a former Liberal MP and cabinet minister, is the director of the Center for Public Ethics at Martin Luther University College.

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Daisy Turnbull explains why she was wrong about Grace Tame https://helviti.com/daisy-turnbull-explains-why-she-was-wrong-about-grace-tame/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 23:57:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/daisy-turnbull-explains-why-she-was-wrong-about-grace-tame/ “My favorite thing about this menu is the proportion of the desserts,” she says. We order oysters (because champagne) and a selection of small dishes: haloumi, trevallies, zucchini on stracciatella and pasta with Moreton Bay bug, with the promise of a long dessert menu. Turnbull hasn’t always been in education. She always liked the idea, […]]]>

“My favorite thing about this menu is the proportion of the desserts,” she says. We order oysters (because champagne) and a selection of small dishes: haloumi, trevallies, zucchini on stracciatella and pasta with Moreton Bay bug, with the promise of a long dessert menu.

Turnbull hasn’t always been in education. She always liked the idea, but gave up because it was…too small.

“I couldn’t imagine walking into a classroom at 21 and trying to teach 17-year-olds.” She considered a career in psychology but chose advertising, in part because it offered insight into the minds of consumers.

In 2011, Turnbull began teaching history and religion and has been at St. Catherine’s School since 2013. Her real passion, she says, is outside of the classroom. She is Director of Wellness, in addition to her substantive role.

“In teaching, you come to a point where you have to choose which rabbit to hunt: curriculum or pastoral. And for me, it has always been pastoral. That focus comes partly from her parents, she says, and partly from her own school experience at Kincoppal-Rose Bay. “There was a real focus on social awareness, social justice. And I’ve always been a firm believer in the benefits of good relationships.

Her new book is about “feeding your inner Seinfeld,” says Turnbull. Janie Barrett

It was this conviction that prompted her to write 50 questions. Turnbull has been a Lifeline Advisor since 2018 (“You don’t want me to swim to save you in North Bondi,” she quips, “but I can listen”), and has witnessed a trend that has her alarmed: women in their 60s and 70s, asking for advice because their adult children no longer spoke to them. Turnbull wondered, when did these relationship breakups happen? And by asking their teenagers questions and building a stronger foundation, could such situations be avoided?

The book talks about “nourish your interior Seinfeld”, says Turnbull. In other words, ask your teen what’s wrong with things. What’s the deal with social media? What’s wrong with your school? It’s part practical advice — there are chapters on financial literacy and cooking — and part exploration of the mind.

Turnbull agrees that she is opening herself up to criticism by becoming an education spokesperson. It’s a happy trade, she says, for work, and while she doesn’t really enjoy it, it’s a change from being attacked for things she can’t change. : namely his parents.

“I’m very happy to be criticized on the book,” she says. She was targeted for the privilege granted by her family and simply said, “I just feel like it’s too easy.”

Something she had to come to terms with is the unanswered question of why people care about her – is it her job or is it her famous last name?

“I still wonder why people care about what I do,” she says. “Really, I always will. Even this interview, she says, gesturing to me, do I have it because of mom and dad? I think maybe two years ago 100% of those interviews were out of curiosity about my family, and now maybe it’s 60%, 70%. It will never be zero. But being their daughter is the greatest of privileges. I hope I will do something good with what they gave me.

It strikes me as unusual, I say, that the daughter of a former Prime Minister and Lord Mayor of Sydney should have a career, let alone one in the less than glamorous field of education. Others in his situation are trying, for example, to escape recognition as friends of Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell.

“And why aren’t more women entering politics? asks Turnbull. “For the very reason we need more women in politics.” Janie Barrett

The 37-year-old, it seems, has learned a thing or two about diplomacy.

“Well, I think most of them work,” she said, dodging the inference. “And what my parents instilled in me was hard work. They always worked so hard. So, I was always going to do that. And I really love teaching.

No plan to enter politics

After her sabbatical, during which she will promote her book, volunteer at Lifeline, and study for her Masters in Educational Psychology (she also has a Masters in Theological Studies), she plans to find another role in teacher, and in the meantime, maybe find a casual job in a school.

For someone born into significant wealth, Turnbull doesn’t seem affected by this, wondering if I’m as thrilled as she is about never having to pay child care again (our two youngest children are starting elementary school this week).

It is not planned to enter politics. At least not yet.

Turnbull was 14 when her father campaigned for Australia to become a republic, and 18 when her mother, Lucy, was appointed mayor of Sydney. She was 30 when her father became prime minister.

Despite her lineage – perhaps because of her – she doesn’t have “candidate’s disease”.

“I don’t know,” she said. “I’m not doing anything now. I really like to teach. My children are young. If the opportunity never arose, she would be “very happy to have a life that didn’t involve politics”. But, she concedes, we need more women in politics. “And why aren’t more women entering politics? she asks ironically. “For the very reason we need more women in politics.”

One woman running for politics is Allegra Spender, daughter of the late Carla Zampatti, who is contesting Turnbull’s father’s former seat Wentworth as an independent. What does Turnbull, paying member of Wentworth think?

“Allegra? She was my babysitter. I’ve known her since I was about seven years old.

Ah.

Turnbull, second from left, in 2015 with her parents, her eldest child and her former husband, when her father was prime minister. Andrew Meares

Spender is “an amazing person,” says Turnbull. “I think Dave [Sharma, the sitting member] has a real fight on its hands. The climate is a strength for her and her campaign. She warns that Wentworth is often seen as a safe Liberal seat, but that is “fundamentally wrong”.

“It must be treated as a marginal seat. Dave is a good member. But I think at the federal level, the party is not talking to Wentworth. It’s not their priority. So we’ll see how it plays out.

Internalized misogyny

The conversation turns to Grace Tame as we ponder dessert (and ultimately decide to skip it; Turnbull has to take her daughter on a kindergarten date).

“It was interesting,” she said, referring to Tame’s refusal to smile during a reception with Prime Minister Scott Morrison. “Within the first five minutes, I was like, ‘Why didn’t you just smile?’ But then I thought, no, it’s our internalized misogyny. We all have it. Always be wise, smile, be friendly. To do otherwise would be our weakness. She pauses. “It was fascinating to me that for five minutes I was in a camp, then I realized I was wrong.

“I think Grace can absolutely do whatever she wants. And I think she’s brilliant. What we want is for women to feel more comfortable, and more importantly, we want young people girls say when they do not do feel comfortable. So we have to break with this idea that girls can’t disappoint the people around them by being less than perfectly civil.

She pauses before continuing.

“And I think bullies often win by being the good guy in the room. They can say, ‘Well, I behaved perfectly well.’ That comment, she says, is not ‘specifically Prime. Minister”.

She was not surprised when Brittany Higgins presented rape allegations to Parliament last year.

“I don’t think Canberra is a terribly healthy place,” she says. “I thought what Brittany did was amazing. And [schoolgirl] Chanel [Contos] too much. This sparked many conversations with the students. It’s something that women have been living in silence for too long.

She has hope, she says, for this generation of teenagers, and girls in particular.

“I think teenage girls are going to change the world,” she says calmly and sincerely. “They are incredibly powerful.

“I think there’s a teenage anger that rightly exists, especially after last year. They’re ready to embrace change.

“I don’t want young women to continue to feel like they have to make themselves small for the men in their lives. I don’t want them always playing for the male gaze. But the thing with these girls is that they are so aware of it. They will decide for themselves what works for them.

The law project

Ursula’s, 92 Hargrave Street, Paddington, NSW

Champagne reseda oysters, $24

Natural oysters, $18

Salad of raw trevally, coconut, turmeric and chilli, $32

Moreton Bay insect pasta, parmesan cheese and shellfish butter, $35

Aphrodite haloumi fried, honey, lemon and mint peas, $30

Zucchini, stracciatella, hazelnut, $13

Purezza sparkling water, $10

Total: $162

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As part of Punjab makeover, BJP gets panthic faces https://helviti.com/as-part-of-punjab-makeover-bjp-gets-panthic-faces/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 18:28:24 +0000 https://helviti.com/as-part-of-punjab-makeover-bjp-gets-panthic-faces/ Last week, Prime Minister Narendra Modi found an unlikely ally in Harnam Singh Dhumma, head of Damdami Taksal, a Sikh seminary once run by Khalistan extremist Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale, who was killed in the Operation Blue Star. While others like the SGPC questioned Modi’s December 26 announcement as Vir Bal Divas to honor the […]]]>

Last week, Prime Minister Narendra Modi found an unlikely ally in Harnam Singh Dhumma, head of Damdami Taksal, a Sikh seminary once run by Khalistan extremist Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale, who was killed in the Operation Blue Star. While others like the SGPC questioned Modi’s December 26 announcement as Vir Bal Divas to honor the two youngest sons of Guru Gobind Singh killed by the Mughals, Dhumma praised him.

Arguably the most vocal Taksal leader after Bhindranwale, Dhumma said: “There are very few who are doing their duty and the Prime Minister has done that. He should be thanked. He told the whole world about the martyrdom of the two youngest sons and the mother of Guru Gobind Singh.

Shortly after Dhumma’s comment, his spokesman, Sarchand Singh, once president of the Federation of Sikh Students, an organization led by Bhindranwale in the 1980s, joined the BJP. Singh, a Punjabi teacher, was followed by Kanwarveer Singh Tohra, grandson of the late Gurcharan Singh Tohra, who remained Chairman of the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee for 27 years and was popularly called the Pope of the Sikhs.

The BJP, which until a few months ago struggled to find Sikh faces in Punjab, now has new members with strong panthic credentials, apart from disgruntled Akali and Congress leaders. The Damdami Taksal teaches the Sikh scriptures and prides itself on protecting the tenets of the religion in their purest form.

But the BJP-Taksal association is curious on both sides. The BJP has spoken with a Khalistan hand since the start of the agricultural protests and raised its voice after the blockade prevented Prime Minister Narendra Modi from addressing a rally earlier this month in Punjab. BJP ally Amarinder Singh regularly speaks of the “threat” posed by Khalistani elements in the border state.

Taksal is, however, closely associated with Punjab’s years of militancy. In the 1980s, extremists commanded by Bhindranwale established their base at Taksal headquarters in Chowk Mehta, 40 km from Amritsar. As recently as 2016, there were allegations that the Taksal was involved in an attempt to kill an opposing Patiala-based preacher, Ranjit Singh Dhadrianwale.

Defending his entry into the BJP, Sarchand said that when regional parties fail to resolve panther issues, an individual is forced to look for alternatives. “The state leadership failed to get its demands met by the Center. The BJP at the Center can resolve long-standing issues such as the release of Sikh political prisoners and others regarding out-of-state gurdwaras.

Defending his entry into the BJP, Sarchand said that when regional parties fail to resolve panther issues, an individual is forced to look for alternatives.

Sarchand also said the Prime Minister had shown his sincerity by trying to bring justice to the victims of the 1984 anti-Sikh riots and by opening up the Kartarpur corridor to allow pilgrims visa-free access to one of the holy Sikh shrines. . “Congress attacked our religion, the most sacred of our sanctuaries (Golden Temple, during Operation Blue Star). BJP supported us, Prime Minister celebrates Gurpurab, why shouldn’t we support him? »

Admitting that not everyone is happy, Sarchan added, “For them, I say we should have a dialogue with the BJP as an insider.”

Regarding the labeling of protesting farmers as “Khalistanis”, Sarchand said the prime minister never called them that. “These are evil elements,” he said, adding that he would rally Sikh historians and intellectuals to support the party.

Tohra, a political novice whose father was a minister in Badal Senior’s Akali Dal cabinet, said an old friend told him the RSS was very fond of Sikhs and the prime minister’s actions showed it. After joining the BJP, Tohra said, his leaders asked him what he would do for the welfare of Sikhs. “Even the Akalis don’t ask themselves this question anymore.”

On the bitterness caused by the farmers’ unrest, Tohra, an engineer-turned-farmer whose actress wife Mahreen Kaleka supported the farm unrest, fired back: “Has a congressional prime minister ever apologized for the Operation Blue Star? But the Prime Minister (Modi) asked for forgiveness for the three agricultural laws.

While the BJP said the developments show Punjabis changing their minds towards it, other parties see it as “ranking opportunism”. Senior Akali leader and former minister Dr Daljeet Cheema said: “People join the BJP for personal gain, and the ‘panthic soch (think)’ will not tolerate it.”

Professor Amarjit Singh, director of Guru Granth Sahib studies at Guru Nanak Dev University in Amritsar, said only time will tell if the saffron party is really interested in solving panthic issues. “It was during their tenure that Punjabi was withdrawn as a special language by Jammu and Kashmir. Full justice has yet to be served in the 1984 riots. The Sachar panel had provided details of the guilty, they can act accordingly.Moreover, if they are serious about the welfare of Punjab, they should open the Wagah border to trade.

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PM to Introduce Faith Discrimination Bill | Flinders news https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-flinders-news/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:56:56 +0000 https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-flinders-news/ Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week. Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws. Details of […]]]>


Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws.

Details of the bill were released on Tuesday evening after the coalition common room backed it.

The laws will state that making a statement of belief, in good faith, would not constitute discrimination under Australian anti-discrimination law.

However, this would not apply to statements that are malicious or that a reasonable person would consider threatening, intimidating, harassing or vilifying any person or group of persons.

The bill will restrict the ability of organizations to impose standards of behavior on members of that profession, trade or occupation that would prevent a person from making a private statement of belief.

And it will allow religious organizations such as schools to give preference to people of the same religion as the religious body in employment decisions.

The government says the bill will not allow discrimination based on age, disability, race or sex.

The laws are not expected to be passed by the end of this year as they will be the subject of a Senate inquiry.

Mr Morrison told his party hall that the bill is about tolerance and the balance between freedom and responsibility.

“This is a bill on religious discrimination, not a bill on religious freedom,” he told members of the coalition.

The Prime Minister also described it as a shield and not a sword.

Some village hall concerns have been raised about the bill, including a contentious clause designed to protect people who have made statements about their religious beliefs.

Others stressed the need to keep the 2019 election promise and get the legislation passed.

Separately, crossbencher Pauline Hanson has indicated that she will not be supporting the bill in its current form, while Rex Patrick and Rebekha Sharkie do not see the need for it.

Earlier Tuesday, Equality Australia, which advocates for the rights of LGBTIQ + people, feared that some of the “worst parts” of the bill might remain.

The main objection of the group was the clause allowing people to make statements about their beliefs.

“This will allow someone to defend themselves against a discrimination claim if they say offensive, insulting, inappropriate and unacceptable things,” CEO Anna Brown told ABC radio.

“In general terms, it reverses existing protections for vulnerable groups, it compromises access to non-judgmental health care and inclusive workplaces.”

Ms Brown feared that a nurse, for example, could be protected if she told someone with HIV that the disease was a punishment from God.

“That person at the reception (would, under the bill) be barred from filing a complaint against the person who made that statement because their statement of belief is protected,” she said.

Associated Australian Press


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PM to Introduce Faith Discrimination Bill | Camden-Narellan Advertiser https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-camden-narellan-advertiser/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:56:56 +0000 https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-camden-narellan-advertiser/ Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week. Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws. Details of […]]]>


Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws.

Details of the bill were released on Tuesday evening after the coalition common room backed it.

The laws will state that making a statement of belief, in good faith, would not constitute discrimination under Australian anti-discrimination law.

However, this would not apply to statements that are malicious or that a reasonable person would consider threatening, intimidating, harassing or vilifying any person or group of persons.

The bill will restrict the ability of organizations to impose standards of behavior on members of that profession, trade or occupation that would prevent a person from making a private statement of belief.

And it will allow religious organizations such as schools to give preference to people of the same religion as the religious body in employment decisions.

The government says the bill will not allow discrimination based on age, disability, race or sex.

The laws are not expected to be passed by the end of this year, as they will be the subject of a Senate inquiry.

Mr Morrison told his party hall that the bill is about tolerance and the balance between freedom and responsibility.

“This is a bill on religious discrimination, not a bill on religious freedom,” he told members of the coalition.

The Prime Minister also described it as a shield and not a sword.

Some village hall concerns have been raised about the bill, including a contentious clause designed to protect people who have made statements about their religious beliefs.

Others stressed the need to keep the 2019 election promise and pass the legislation.

Separately, crossbencher Pauline Hanson has indicated that she will not be supporting the bill in its current form, while Rex Patrick and Rebekha Sharkie do not see the need for it.

Earlier on Tuesday, Equality Australia, which advocates for the rights of LGBTIQ + people, feared some of the “worst parts” of the bill might remain.

The main objection of the group was the clause allowing people to make statements about their beliefs.

“This will allow someone to defend themselves against a discrimination claim if they say offensive, insulting, inappropriate and unacceptable things,” CEO Anna Brown told ABC Radio.

“In general terms, it reverses existing protections for vulnerable groups, it compromises access to non-judgmental health care and inclusive workplaces.”

Ms Brown was concerned that a nurse, for example, could be protected if she told someone with HIV that the disease was a punishment from God.

“That person at the reception (would, under the bill) be barred from filing a complaint against the person who made that statement because their statement of belief is protected,” she said.

Associated Australian Press


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PM to Introduce Faith Discrimination Bill | Magnet https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-magnet/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:56:56 +0000 https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-magnet/ Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week. Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws. Details of […]]]>


Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws.

Details of the bill were released on Tuesday evening after the coalition common room backed it.

The laws will state that making a statement of belief, in good faith, would not constitute discrimination under Australian anti-discrimination law.

However, this would not apply to statements that are malicious or that a reasonable person would consider threatening, intimidating, harassing or vilifying any person or group of persons.

The bill will restrict the ability of organizations to impose standards of behavior on members of that profession, trade or occupation that would prevent a person from making a private statement of belief.

And it will allow religious organizations such as schools to give preference to people of the same religion as the religious body in employment decisions.

The government says the bill will not allow discrimination based on age, disability, race or sex.

The laws are not expected to be passed by the end of this year, as they will be the subject of a Senate inquiry.

Mr Morrison told his party hall that the bill is about tolerance and the balance between freedom and responsibility.

“This is a bill on religious discrimination, not a bill on religious freedom,” he told members of the coalition.

The Prime Minister also described it as a shield and not a sword.

Some village hall concerns have been raised about the bill, including a contentious clause designed to protect people who have made statements about their religious beliefs.

Others stressed the need to keep the 2019 election promise and get the legislation passed.

Separately, crossbencher Pauline Hanson has indicated that she will not be supporting the bill in its current form, while Rex Patrick and Rebekha Sharkie do not see the need for it.

Earlier Tuesday, Equality Australia, which advocates for the rights of LGBTIQ + people, feared that some of the “worst parts” of the bill might remain.

The main objection of the group was the clause allowing people to make statements about their beliefs.

“This will allow someone to defend themselves against a discrimination claim if they say offensive, insulting, inappropriate and unacceptable things,” CEO Anna Brown told ABC radio.

“In general terms, it reverses existing protections for vulnerable groups, it compromises access to non-judgmental health care and inclusive workplaces.”

Ms Brown feared that a nurse, for example, could be protected if she told someone with HIV that the disease was a punishment from God.

“That person at the reception (would, under the bill) be barred from filing a complaint against the person who made that statement because their statement of belief is protected,” she said.

Associated Australian Press


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PM to Introduce Faith Discrimination Bill | Narooma News https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-narooma-news/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:56:56 +0000 https://helviti.com/pm-to-introduce-faith-discrimination-bill-narooma-news/ Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week. Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws. Details of […]]]>


Discrimination on the basis of religious belief or activity will be made illegal in the areas of employment, education and the provision of goods and services, under a bill to be submitted to the federal parliament this week.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will personally present on Thursday the government’s long-promised religious discrimination laws.

Details of the bill were released on Tuesday evening after the coalition common room backed it.

The laws will state that making a statement of belief, in good faith, would not constitute discrimination under Australian anti-discrimination law.

However, this would not apply to statements that are malicious or that a reasonable person would consider threatening, intimidating, harassing or vilifying any person or group of persons.

The bill will restrict the ability of organizations to impose standards of behavior on members of that profession, trade or occupation that would prevent a person from making a private statement of belief.

And it will allow religious organizations such as schools to give preference to people of the same religion as the religious body in employment decisions.

The government says the bill will not allow discrimination based on age, disability, race or sex.

The laws are not expected to be passed by the end of this year, as they will be the subject of a Senate inquiry.

Mr Morrison told his party hall that the bill is about tolerance and the balance between freedom and responsibility.

“This is a bill on religious discrimination, not a bill on religious freedom,” he told members of the coalition.

The Prime Minister also described it as a shield and not a sword.

Some village hall concerns have been raised about the bill, including a contentious clause designed to protect people who have made statements about their religious beliefs.

Others stressed the need to keep the 2019 election promise and pass the legislation.

Separately, crossbencher Pauline Hanson has indicated that she will not be supporting the bill in its current form, while Rex Patrick and Rebekha Sharkie do not see the need for it.

Earlier Tuesday, Equality Australia, which advocates for the rights of LGBTIQ + people, feared that some of the “worst parts” of the bill might remain.

The main objection of the group was the clause allowing people to make statements about their beliefs.

“This will allow someone to defend themselves against a discrimination claim if they say offensive, insulting, inappropriate and unacceptable things,” CEO Anna Brown told ABC Radio.

“In general terms, it reverses existing protections for vulnerable groups, it compromises access to non-judgmental health care and inclusive workplaces.”

Ms Brown was concerned that a nurse, for example, could be protected if she told someone with HIV that the disease was a punishment from God.

“That person at the reception (would, under the bill) be barred from filing a complaint against the person who made that statement because their statement of belief is protected,” she said.

Associated Australian Press


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Pakistan’s gentle surrender to Tehreek-e-Labbaik was inevitable https://helviti.com/pakistans-gentle-surrender-to-tehreek-e-labbaik-was-inevitable/ https://helviti.com/pakistans-gentle-surrender-to-tehreek-e-labbaik-was-inevitable/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 23:00:28 +0000 https://helviti.com/pakistans-gentle-surrender-to-tehreek-e-labbaik-was-inevitable/ “The state’s mandate must be executed” was the refrain that emerged from Islamabad last week when Prime Minister Imran Khan confronted the radical Islamic movement called Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan which marched towards Islamabad with a set impossible demands, including the expulsion of the French Ambassador. After many hand wringing, the Pakistani government threatened to use force […]]]>


“The state’s mandate must be executed” was the refrain that emerged from Islamabad last week when Prime Minister Imran Khan confronted the radical Islamic movement called Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan which marched towards Islamabad with a set impossible demands, including the expulsion of the French Ambassador. After many hand wringing, the Pakistani government threatened to use force against the TLP and ordered the deployment of paramilitary forces to prevent the march towards Islamabad. He also launched this ultimate accusation which can be brought against any political opponent in Pakistan – accusing the TLP of working for the Indian intelligence agency, the Research and Analysis Wing.

Pakistan’s National Security Advisor Moeed Yusuf thundered in a tweet that no force in Pakistan can challenge state power. Yusuf insisted that “the TLP has crossed the red line and exhausted the patience of the state. They have tortured police officers, destroyed public property and continue to cause massive public disruption ”. He added that “the law will run its course for each of them and terrorists will be treated like terrorists without mercy.”

All this bravado, however, lasted barely 48 hours. Islamabad apparently bought peace with the TLP on Sunday. As in its frequent mobilizations in recent years, the TLP has once again pushed back the Pakistani state and reinforced its own political weight.

A relatively new phenomenon, the TLP, was founded in 2015 by Khadim Hussain Rizvi, a burning cleric who died in November 2020. It now has many followers among the Pakistani Barelvi sect. At the heart of the TLP ideology is the protection of the honor of the Prophet and a vigorous defense of Pakistan’s controversial blasphemy laws. In Pakistan, anyone deemed to have insulted Islam or the Prophet Muhammad can face the death penalty under blasphemy laws.

The fierce TLP ideology was mobilized by the establishment for political gain to weaken Nawaz Sharif’s government in 2017. Imran Khan, then in opposition, actively supported TLP protests against Sharif. Some in Pakistan suspect that the TLP has again been mobilized to bring down Imran Khan a notch or two.

The TLP won enough votes in the 2018 general election, especially in the Punjab, to prevent the Muslim League of Sharif from winning its traditional stronghold. After ousting Sharif, the Deep State gathered a majority for Imran Khan both in Punjab province and in the National Assembly.

The TLP was also unwilling to spare Imran Khan’s government. He continued his repeated attacks on the government, mounting massive protests in April against the arrest of its leader Saad Hussain Rizvi, who succeeded his father as head of the TLP. The TLP then set April 20 as the deadline for the expulsion of the French ambassador for his outrage at an incident of blasphemy in France.

In October 2020, Samuel Paty, a French schoolteacher who had shown caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad in a classroom was beheaded by a young Islamic fanatic. French President Emmanuel Macron has criticized Islamists and defended traditional French principles of secularism. Prime Minister Imran Khan denounced Macron’s remarks as the TLP organized massive protests across the country.

The government of Imran, caught in a split stick, could neither say no to the TLP nor accept its demands. After all, France was a major aid donor to Pakistan, the leading European power, and a permanent member of the UN Security Council. Imran Khan’s government has found a way to rig the problem and throw the ball into the court of the National Assembly. As the TLP returned to the streets last month, Imran Khan found himself in deep trouble again.

Despite showing great determination to put the TLP back in its place, the Pakistani government quickly turned to the more familiar strategy of accommodation this weekend. Saad Rizvi and other TLP leaders were taken from prison to shelters in Islamabad and the government turned to senior Barelvi clerics to negotiate with them.

The terms of the agreement between Islamabad and TLP were not disclosed to the public. Media reports suggest that the government has agreed to release Saad Rizvi and other leaders, withdraw all cases against TLP cadres and unfreeze their bank accounts. It is not clear whether the TLP agreed to waive the French ambassador’s deportation request.

After decades of promotion and appeasement towards religious groups of one type or another, the Pakistani state is now finding that its room for maneuver has shrunk considerably compared to Islamist groups. But while the state has repeatedly bowed to pressure from right-wing religious groups, it has acted ruthlessly against a secular movement called the Pashtun Tahafuz Movement.

While the TLP has been a violent force, the PTM, demanding self-respect for the Pashtuns, has been completely peaceful. If Saad Rizvi, who was convicted of violence by the courts is treated with political deference, Ali Wazir, leader of the PTM and member of the National Assembly has been jailed just for a speech.

The instrumentalization of religious groups for political ends at home and abroad has long been a convenient strategy for the Pakistani state. At home, he used Islam to marginalize moderate and secular political forces. Abroad, it has nurtured and deployed militant Islamic forces to destabilize its neighbors, particularly Afghanistan and India. But today Pakistan is struggling to control the religious kit. Religious forces have gained the power to challenge their creator, the Pakistani state.

Although Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of the state, envisioned a secular future for Pakistan, his successors gradually turned towards the use of religion for political ends. A one-off call for the “modernization of Islam” from General Ayub Khan or for “enlightened moderation” from Pervez Musharraf could not stop the decline of the state in relation to religious forces.

Pakistan’s soft surrender to the TLP underscores how difficult it is for a state to regain the authority it ceded to religious forces. Given the power of religion, most states find a way to live with it. But giving too much room to religious or other extra-constitutional forces inevitably weakens the state.

On the one hand, there is no end to welcoming such forces. Each concession obliges the next. The power of religious groups undermines the social and economic modernization that most developing societies desperately need. It also makes it difficult for the state to pursue its national interests on the world stage.

Pakistan’s support for the Taliban in Afghanistan and various jihadist groups in Kashmir has long been seen as a successful use of religion for foreign policy purposes. Yet, the permissive environment Islamabad has created for terrorism has also spawned violent religious groups who want to fight the Pakistani state.

On top of all this, these groups have started to weaken Pakistan’s ties with its long-standing partners in the West – such as the United States and Europe – and its neighbors. The deployment of religious extremism as a political tool has also prompted international sanctions and financial constraints. Islamabad’s trajectory is a self-destructive trajectory that is best not followed by others. Sacrificing the state is too high a price for any political party that wants to rule a nation.

(The writer is director of the Institute of South Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore and associate editor on international affairs for The Indian Express)


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Canada’s Muslim population triples in 15 years https://helviti.com/canadas-muslim-population-triples-in-15-years/ https://helviti.com/canadas-muslim-population-triples-in-15-years/#respond Sun, 31 Oct 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/canadas-muslim-population-triples-in-15-years/ Heather Stefanson will become Manitoba’s 24th Premier. May be. Shelly Glover, his only opponent in the CP leadership race, is not ready to concede defeat. The province’s ruling Progressive Conservatives picked Stefanson as their new leader on Saturday in a 51% vote, showing membership support was practically split in half. Stefanson, who received 8,405 votes, […]]]>


Heather Stefanson will become Manitoba’s 24th Premier.

May be.

Shelly Glover, his only opponent in the CP leadership race, is not ready to concede defeat.

The province’s ruling Progressive Conservatives picked Stefanson as their new leader on Saturday in a 51% vote, showing membership support was practically split in half.

Stefanson, who received 8,405 votes, edged Glover with just 363 votes. Glover received 8,042.

“I am ready to take on the many challenges we face. We will face these challenges together, ”Stefanson said in his victory speech at the Victoria Inn in Winnipeg.

“A strong PC party is vital for a strong Manitoba and together I know we will emerge from this race more united than ever by focusing on securing a third consecutive majority government in 2023.”

Glover did not officially concede, citing insufficient information to do so.

When asked by a reporter what position she would like in Stefanson’s government, Glover replied, “Prime Minister. “

Stefanson, an MP for Tuxedo who served as health minister under former prime minister Brian Pallister, will face the immediate challenge of convincing some skeptical party members that the campaign results are in fact the members’ will.

The end of the two-month campaign was strewn with a flood of complaints about missing and late ballots and criticism.

“I think we should not trust a political organization that does not know how to put a stamp on an envelope and put that envelope in the mailbox to manage our health system,” said NDP leader Wab Kinew on CBC.

A call from Glover, a former police officer and MP for Saint-Boniface, for a delay in delivering results was rejected by the party leadership.

Stefanson expressed his complete confidence in the process.

George Orle, chairman of the party’s leadership elections committee, vouched for the integrity of the vote and denied that it was an “incompetent and disorganized campaign that deprived people of their rights “.

“Anything about the missing or undelivered envelopes is false,” said Orle, who assured members that security firm Paladin oversaw the delivery of the ballots.

“Each ballot had to be verified for the PIN code, it had to be verified for the ID. Only then was it placed in its sealed envelope in our ballot box.

“We have reached around 96% of deliveries,” said Orle.

“Every envelope that came back as undeliverable came out to us again,” Orle said. “We replaced over 1,000 ballots that we confirmed had not been received. We did it appropriately.

On Saturday, the management team scurried across Manitoba carrying ballot boxes to pick up ballots at drop-off points.

Orle blamed COVID-19 and an increase in membership for delivery issues.

After the unpopular Pallister resigned in September, people returned to the party.

Membership grew from 5,500 to over 25,000 in three weeks.

“We admit that we were not able to circulate all the ballots to everyone who might have been entitled to them,” Orle said, explaining that some members were not in the database.

“We have around 17,000 returned ballots,” said Orle, adding that a 65% ratio is “something to be proud of”.

Of the 16,465 ballots cast, 82 were canceled and 17 were considered contested.

Meanwhile, Stephanson will also face the formidable task of convincing disgruntled Manitobans that she is not an extension of Pallister whose scorned health policies and crippling COVID mandates she willingly implemented.

If all goes well, Stefanson will replace Acting Prime Minister Kelvin Goertzen in a swearing-in ceremony, the date of which will be announced.

Slobodian is the Manitoba Senior Columnist for the Western Standard

lslobodian@westernstandardonline.com


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