human rights – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 21:09:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png human rights – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 Lawyer and religious leader inaugurating the lecture series | News, Sports, Jobs https://helviti.com/lawyer-and-religious-leader-inaugurating-the-lecture-series-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 05:17:55 +0000 https://helviti.com/lawyer-and-religious-leader-inaugurating-the-lecture-series-news-sports-jobs/ ELKINS — Davis & Elkins College will open its Spring Lecture Series on Thursday, sponsored by the Morrison-Novakovic Center for Faith and Public Policy. Allyson McKinney Timm, founder and executive director of Justice Revival in Washington, DC, will be the guest speaker for the 7 p.m. event at the Myles Center for the […]]]>

ELKINS — Davis & Elkins College will open its Spring Lecture Series on Thursday, sponsored by the Morrison-Novakovic Center for Faith and Public Policy.

Allyson McKinney Timm, founder and executive director of Justice Revival in Washington, DC, will be the guest speaker for the 7 p.m. event at the Myles Center for the Arts.

In his lecture entitled “Reconciling religion and human rights? The experience of a lawyer grappling with lingering tensions over gender equality,” Timm will explore the complex relationship between religion and human rights and, in particular, the ongoing tensions over the issue of gender equality.

“D&E is very fortunate to have a leading human rights lawyer and faith leader joining us as we begin the Center’s spring presentations on democracy and faith,” said Dr. Bryan Wagoner, associate professor of religious studies and philosophy and director of the Morrison-Novakovic Center for Faith and Public Policy. “Allyson is a national thought leader who will help our community reflect on women’s rights as human rights and the complex connections between rights discourse and matters of faith.

A human rights lawyer, scholar, and religious leader, Timm has two decades of experience advocating for the dignity and rights of people on the margins, in the United States and around the world. His work promoting justice and equality has spanned the non-profit, private and academic sectors. After founding Justice Revival in 2017, she was named “one of ten religious leaders to watch” by the Center for American Progress the following year. His writing has appeared in Sojourners, California Lawyer, The Independent, USA Today, Yale Divinity School’s Reflections magazine, and others.

As a Robert M. Cover-Allard K. Lowenstein Fellow in International Human Rights at Yale Law School, Timm taught and supervised students at the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic, investigating and analyzing issues such as child and forced marriage. , human trafficking, religious freedom. and the human rights to education and housing.

Timm also created and led the Uganda Field Office of the International Justice Mission, an organization that launched a successful program to defend the property and inheritance rights of vulnerable widows and orphans.

Prior to joining IJM, Timm was a litigation associate in the San Francisco office of Latham & Watkins LLP, where she contributed to a team that successfully advocated for the reform of unlawful conditions in California’s juvenile prison system. She worked on a first civil action to combat human trafficking and served as a volunteer in a trial team with the Office of the Prosecutor of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Over the years, she has worked on several projects dealing with constitutional law, justice and peacebuilding issues in what is now South Sudan.

Timm holds professional degrees in law and business from Georgetown University and a Master of Divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. She is ordained a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church (USA) and will be teaching adult education and preaching at Davis Memorial Presbyterian Church on Sunday, February 27.

Timm’s lecture is the first in a series sponsored by the Morrison-Novakovic Center for Faith and Public Policy this spring that focuses on the themes of democracy and faith. All are free and open to the public. Mandatory masks and social distancing.

For more information, email Wagoner at wagonerb@dewv.edu.



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox








]]>
Intellectuals call for repeal of anti-conversion laws https://helviti.com/intellectuals-call-for-repeal-of-anti-conversion-laws/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 01:07:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/intellectuals-call-for-repeal-of-anti-conversion-laws/ Through Express press service BENGALURU: Several prominent citizens and intellectuals have, through a petition, demanded the repeal of all anti-conversion laws in India, amid the planned tabling of the Right to Freedom of Religion Bill of the Karnataka, 2021, in the Upper House on February 14. The petition launched by the National Solidarity Forum (NSF), […]]]>

Through Express press service

BENGALURU: Several prominent citizens and intellectuals have, through a petition, demanded the repeal of all anti-conversion laws in India, amid the planned tabling of the Right to Freedom of Religion Bill of the Karnataka, 2021, in the Upper House on February 14.

The petition launched by the National Solidarity Forum (NSF), a network of civil rights groups and individuals, called for people to come together in defense of the values ​​enshrined in the Constitution and the protection of the human rights of minorities and other marginalized sections in India.

While asserting that a new anti-conversion law is not necessary since the Constitution contains sufficient provisions for this, the signatories of the petition also stated that “wherever the anti-conversion law, ironically officially called the freedom of religion, was enacted, it became a justification for the persecution of minorities and other marginalized identities,” said Prof. Ram Punyani, head of NSF.

Margaret Alva, former Governor of Goa, Gujarat and Uttarakhand, in support of the petition, called for supporting the NSF and dissuading the government from passing the bill. Early signatories of the petition to the President include former Navy Chief of Staff Admiral L Ramdas, dancer Mallika Sarabhai, activist Medha Patkar and former Union Minister Mani Shankar Aiyar, among others.

]]>
Faith groups take the lead in refugee resettlement talks | News, Sports, Jobs https://helviti.com/faith-groups-take-the-lead-in-refugee-resettlement-talks-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 07:31:32 +0000 https://helviti.com/faith-groups-take-the-lead-in-refugee-resettlement-talks-news-sports-jobs/ Jamestown Mayor Eddie Sundquist is pictured in December at St Luke’s Episcopal Church. Sundquist said a coalition of faith leaders and community members took the lead on the proposal. Photo PJ by Eric Tichy A proposal to resettle refugees in the town of Jamestown has taken the next steps thanks to […]]]>

Jamestown Mayor Eddie Sundquist is pictured in December at St Luke’s Episcopal Church. Sundquist said a coalition of faith leaders and community members took the lead on the proposal. Photo PJ by Eric Tichy

A proposal to resettle refugees in the town of Jamestown has taken the next steps thanks to a coalition of faith leaders and community members.

Jamestown Mayor Eddie Sundquist said the city started the conversation about refugees coming to the area, but the community and faith groups picked up the idea and started the process.

“The city has entered into a conversation with various organizations regarding the possibility of relocating refugees to the city of Jamestown,” Sundquist said. “As part of this discussion, we had several faith and interfaith groups coming together and saying, ‘Hey, we want to take the lead on this.

Sundquist said city officials are pleased that faith groups are accepting the proposal.

“Immigration, in many cases, has been handled by faith groups in many different places,” he said. “The city continues to be a part of this, along with the school and others, but we are thrilled to see the community come together to take up this torch which we believe will have a huge impact on the city. I am very excited to see the possibility that we bring refugees to resettle in the city.This not only helps to expand the depth of our community and our diversity, but it brings in a new workforce and talent.

Reverend Luke Fodor of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Jamestown is one of the religious leaders who played a leading role in the refugee resettlement process. Fodor said he was involved organizationally, helping to facilitate the creation of a group to move the process forward. Currently, the group works with the refugee resettlement organization Journey’s End.

“They’re right in Buffalo and they can work within 100 miles of their main office,” Fodor said. “It’s a church-based entity, but it’s not about Sunday services, evangelism or proselytizing. It is about how the church network makes its first call to care for the stranger as enshrined both in the words of Jesus but also in the words of the Prophets in the Hebrew Bible. It is this work that has been the main mission of the church – to welcome hospitality and to connect with those on the margins of society.

Fodor said the idea of ​​community members and members of the faith community participating in this effort is to ensure that it continues and is done well. One of the first things the group did when they started meeting in mid-January was to create a list of why they wanted to work on this issue and why refugees might consider residing in the Jamestown area. These reasons include:

the diversity

¯ refugees strengthen and build our community

¯ life-changing relationships and a different perspective

¯ learn and share the experience of resilience

¯ prepare children to live in a globalized world

¯ population decline

¯ new energy, restlessness and motivation

¯ breaking stereotypes to live beyond fear

human rights

¯ revitalization

“We want to make sure we get it right if we want to continue,” he said. “If this was going to continue, it had to be a community effort that was not entirely run by the city. It is outside their prerogative.

Currently, the refugees in question are on military bases inside or outside the country. The refugees were thoroughly vetted and given special status by the United States government. By definition, refugees are people who have been forced to leave their country of origin due to war, persecution or natural disaster.

Currently, Fodor said the group is working with Journey’s End and developing a workable plan to bring refugees to the area. The idea would be to start small and bring a few families into town.

“It’s really important that it’s a community effort because I really think it’s the community that will keep them safe – not the government or the police – we have to do this job,” Fodor said. “It basically comes down to the fact that diversity makes us stronger – not weaker. I think the refugees are here to build – not to take. There may be some kind of initial phase when they start, they need a bit of resources to get started. But overall they are there to build.

Elizabeth Litton, a member of the refugee resettlement group, said the group was working to identify local resources and create a plan to welcome refugee families into the community. She said refugee resettlement is an important issue that Jamestown cannot pass up.

“Refugee resettlement matters” Litton said. “The refugees I have met share many of our values. They love their family, work hard and give back to their community. Even though they were forced to flee their home country due to persecution, they are some of the kindest and most resilient people you will ever meet. They are our neighbors and it is our responsibility to welcome them as we ourselves would like to be welcomed.



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox







]]>
After a year-long hiatus, the North American Division hosts third Religious Freedom Prayer Breakfast https://helviti.com/after-a-year-long-hiatus-the-north-american-division-hosts-third-religious-freedom-prayer-breakfast/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 12:33:22 +0000 https://helviti.com/after-a-year-long-hiatus-the-north-american-division-hosts-third-religious-freedom-prayer-breakfast/ On January 13, 2022, more than 40 people from various faith traditions gathered for the third Religious Freedom Prayer Breakfast hosted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in North America (NAD). The event recognized January 16 as National Religious Freedom Day in the United States and included a prayer for elected officials, community, nation, global health […]]]>

On January 13, 2022, more than 40 people from various faith traditions gathered for the third Religious Freedom Prayer Breakfast hosted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in North America (NAD). The event recognized January 16 as National Religious Freedom Day in the United States and included a prayer for elected officials, community, nation, global health and healing, peace, religious freedom and unity. of mind. Representatives of several faith groups prayed over these topics, including participants from Adventist, Jewish, Muslim, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Baptist and non-denominational Christian traditions. Several NAD leaders and local church leaders participated with prayer and music.

Eric Baxter, president of the Silver Spring Stake—Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and senior counsel for Becket, a nonprofit, public-benefit legal and educational institute, delivered special remarks for the event, which was scaled back due to the coronavirus pandemic.

During the prayer breakfast welcome, Orlan Johnson, NAD Director of Public Affairs and Religious Liberty, provided a brief summary of the program and shared the significance of the January date for the event. . “We are here to celebrate an important day: National Religious Freedom Day, which commemorates the signing in 1786 of Virginia’s historic Statute of Religious Freedom. It was a law by Thomas Jefferson, which included powerful language that later served as the basis for our First Amendment to the US Constitution – language that means you and I can each worship God in any way we see fit. appropriate.

Johnson further shared, “No matter what religious tradition we represent, we can celebrate together and be grateful to live in this country that respects religious freedom. Sometimes here in America, however, we begin to feel convinced that this is how it is, and this is how the world should be. But the Pew Research Center estimates that 80% of the world’s population lives in areas where religious freedom is severely restricted. The reality is that it’s a bit like looking in your car’s rear view mirror: the objects you see in the rear view mirror can come at you faster than you think! And if religious freedom is restricted in someone else’s garden, we need to be aware that it’s possible it could happen in ours as well.

Orlan Johnson, director of public affairs and religious liberty for the NAD, welcomes attendees to the 2021 Religious Liberty Prayer Breakfast at division headquarters on January 13. [Photo by Pieter Damsteegt]

During his address, Baxter noted that although people represent different traditions and beliefs, we can still work together toward the common goal of promoting and protecting religious freedom for all. “In today’s world, we have so many opportunities to feel division and discord. It is good, on the contrary, to focus on what brings us together,” he said.

Baxter told the story of one of the many religious accommodation cases he fought. Captain Simratpal “Simmer” Singh is a devout Sikh and decorated army captain who was forced to choose between serving his country and wearing the articles of his faith: his uncropped hair, beard and turban.

“He was forced to make the difficult choice between following his religion by serving his God or following his religion by serving his country. It was basically an impossible choice that no one should have to face,” Baxter explained. The case allowed the military to end its 30-year beard ban and issue new regulations stating that Sikh soldiers will not be forced to give up their religious turbans, uncropped hair or beards while throughout their military career.

“We need to stand in solidarity with those who don’t share our faith and even with those who have no faith at all,” Baxter said. “When we get to know each other, we can find ways to work together to protect religious freedom for all…We still have many challenges ahead of us, including a general decline in religiosity and a fairly widespread apathy toward the importance of religious freedom. ”

He acknowledged the difficult issues that have emerged in recent years, including the need to preserve religious freedom while ensuring non-discrimination. “I believe that the well-being of our society, and the world at large, depends heavily on our ability as individuals and religious organizations to support one another as we seek in good faith, with humility and compassion, to meet some of these challenges.”

prayer time

Seven special prayers were offered during the event. The prayer for religious freedom was delivered by Kyoshin Ahn, executive secretary of the NAD. Ahn gave thanks for the gift of religious freedom – the right to love and worship God. “We know that not only is religious freedom central to our relationship with you, but we also recognize that it is the foundation of human rights, justice and the common good,” he said. he declares.

A Prayer for the Community followed from Jennifer Gray, Director of Interfaith Outreach for the Governor’s Office of Community Initiatives.

“Our Lord, we pray that our nation, the United States, will remain loving and compassionate. Remove prejudice from our hearts and enable us to love our brothers and sisters of all faiths,” Missionary Umar Nayyar, of Wasaya Baitur Rehman Mosque, said during his prayer for the nation.

As he prayed for the elected, Lt. Col. YS (Lonny) Wortham, State Chaplain for the Maryland National Guard, said, “We pray for these officials, that you root them and root them in love. [for] their Lord, and it would not be by their purpose or their will, but they would hunger and thirst for the things of God. Father, we pray that You’ll save them from their pride; we pray that you save them from their desires for power, so that they may become servants of the people of this country and this nation.

Reverend Jerome Stephens, director of community outreach to Senator Ben Cardin, offered a prayer for global health and healing. He asked God to help overwhelmed healthcare workers during the pandemic. Stephens also said: “It is our prayer that all be encouraged. As we endure this season, it is our faith in God that [we know] a change will come for better health and better healing.

A prayer for peace followed from the Rev. Jennifer Hawks, associate general counsel for the Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty. Hawks addressed disturbing trends in society with domestic violence, racism and negative cultures in social media. She prayed: “Critics are ready to replay our mistakes and failures, trapping us in this negative loop, telling us we are never enough. May we find peace through rest so that we can be agents of shalom within our networks.…May the day soon come when we will treat everyone with the worth and dignity that comes from being created in your image.

Ivan Williams, director of the NAD Ministerial Association, closed the event with a prayer for unity of spirit.

“Oh, God, our maker of every race, tongue, language and people. From your providential hand, we have received our right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. You called us as your people and you gave us the right and the duty to worship you. Thank you for calling us to live out our faith in the midst of the world, accepting the faith of all,” Williams began.

He continued, “Give us the strength of mind and heart to easily defend our freedoms when they are threatened. And give us the courage to raise our voices – even beyond our own rights – for the rights of others. We pray [for] a clear, compassionate, and united voice for all your sons and daughters gathered together in your creation at this defining hour in our nation’s history, that with every trial withstood and every danger overcome now and with our children and grand- children… that this great earth will always be “one nation, under God, indivisible, with freedom and justice for all”.

This article originally appeared on the North American Division news site

right-hook-arrowcontact
]]>
My wife’s grandfather was executed for his Baha’i faith. Iran has not changed enough. https://helviti.com/my-wifes-grandfather-was-executed-for-his-bahai-faith-iran-has-not-changed-enough/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 19:32:27 +0000 https://helviti.com/my-wifes-grandfather-was-executed-for-his-bahai-faith-iran-has-not-changed-enough/ (RNS) – Last week, the Iranian nuclear talks appeared to be moving closer to a resolution, with the US Treasury Department authorizing South Korea to pay $63 million in outstanding damages to an Iranian company and the Iranians releasing Aras Amiri, an Anglo-Iranian prisoner. . These developments were not characteristic of a process hitherto marked […]]]>

(RNS) – Last week, the Iranian nuclear talks appeared to be moving closer to a resolution, with the US Treasury Department authorizing South Korea to pay $63 million in outstanding damages to an Iranian company and the Iranians releasing Aras Amiri, an Anglo-Iranian prisoner. . These developments were not characteristic of a process hitherto marked by tension and mistrust.

Whatever the outcome of the talks, they have already produced bitter fruit: further evidence of an increasingly dysfunctional international order, stalled by increased polarization. I’m interested in the nuclear talks, but not just as a barometer of the state of international diplomacy.

My interest in Iran is smaller, stranger and sadder: 40 years ago this week, the Iranian government admitted to executing members of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha’is of Iran. The Assembly was a small group elected to look after the affairs of the Baha’i community – a religious minority that believes in the unity of mankind and the elimination of all forms of prejudice. Kamran Samimi, my wife’s grandfather, was among those killed.

The new revolutionary government announced the executions at a press conference, disguising them under a litany of fabricated accusations: that the Baha’is were spies, thieves and foreign stooges. While these accusations were patently ridiculous, the outright admission of the murders of Baha’i leaders was serious. He signaled with bracing cruelty and shamelessness the kind of welcome Bahá’ís could expect in revolutionary Iran.

Ever since my marriage into the Samimi family six years ago, I have searched for Kamran, drawn inexplicably to him and the nature of his death with a force that sometimes surprises me. What do I hope to learn from him?

The bare facts about his life sometimes hide more than they reveal. He was born in 1926, he lived in Jakarta for a few years, teaching English. He dressed colorfully, he liked jazz music, he was tall and handsome. But all these details do not justify my interest in him. The stories I hear tell me a little more.

At a meeting of the Assembly, he and his colleagues were consulting on how to protect their community, already under heavy pressure from executions, vigilante violence and imprisonment. During a pool break outside, to cut the tension, this dignified man amazed everyone by throwing himself into it fully clothed – managing to make everyone laugh.

I learn the most, however, when I focus on his final days, which were preserved by loved ones and others who are equally drawn to his memory.

I spoke recently with the only surviving member of his Assembly, Guiti Vahid. Late at night, she received a call informing her that more Baha’is had been executed in the city of Shiraz. In accordance with perverse custom, the Baha’is had been killed on the eve of one of our holy days, with the object of spoiling the festivities of the community and undermining morale. She lay awake with the news for several hours before deciding to call Kamran. Although it was late, he responded instantly and listened intently as she shared the news.

“Guiti,” he said, “let’s keep this horrible news between us, just for today, for the sake of our colleagues.” The day passed excruciatingly slowly, but Kamran wanted his friends to at least enjoy the festivities. “Let them, at least,” he said, “have their holy day.”

Kamran Samimi speaks during his trial in December 1981. Video screenshot

There is presumably a video of the Assembly trial, lost for years only to resurface recently. Kamran sits upright alongside his companions, the poor quality of the image stripping away its realism to the point that it appears to look more like a painting than a film. The key to his freedom is simple. He only has to recant his convictions and he would be released.

At some point during what happened to him in the last few days in Evin prison, I wonder if he was tempted? In the footage, Kamran inexplicably smiles through the vicious accusations. They frequently interrupt him as he calmly unravels their lies. Her nerves, almost certainly tested by torture, show themselves only in the slight tic of touching her face with her fingers. A few hours after the camera was cut off, he died, buried without honor or ceremony.

This is what adherence to principle looks like. It’s selfless, courageous, and ultimately transcendent, as it takes us to the breaking point of what we think is possible, and then pushes it further.

Iranian Baha’is carry on this legacy of moral strength today. They endure arrest, imprisonment, torture, economic deprivation, land expropriation, denial of higher education, and other forms of state-sanctioned persecution. Far from yielding to this pressure, the community continues to practice its teachings of service to humanity, fully believing, even if their government does not, that they are full citizens, loyal to their country and its inhabitants.

As I watch the dark carousel of nuclear talks spin in circles, I think of all that may depend on it, including, perhaps, in the future Iran’s religious and ethnic minorities, who often serve as scapegoats for the Iranian regime’s diplomatic policy. and economic failures.

Despite international censorship and repeated evidence of growing popular discontent, he has made no fundamental adjustments and remains committed to the same ideology that justified Kamran’s murder 40 years ago and continues to justify the persecution of Baha’is and other minorities.

Could our leaders say that they respect our principles if a nuclear agreement does not take into account such human rights violations? Kamran’s story illustrates the difference between those who are willing to kill for an idea and those who are willing to die for an idea.

It should not be forgotten.

(James Samimi Farr is a writer and Baha’i living in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The views expressed in this commentary do not necessarily reflect those of Religion News Service.)

]]>
‘No weakening’: Liberal state governments express concern over federal religious discrimination bill | Religion https://helviti.com/no-weakening-liberal-state-governments-express-concern-over-federal-religious-discrimination-bill-religion/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 16:32:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/no-weakening-liberal-state-governments-express-concern-over-federal-religious-discrimination-bill-religion/ The Liberal governments of New South Wales and Tasmania have expressed concern that the federal religious discrimination bill trumps their anti-discrimination laws. The core provisions of the Morrison government’s bill, including those protecting the beliefs and hiring practices of religious institutions, would trump state laws, potentially rendering the claims unworkable, they submitted. to a parliamentary […]]]>


The Liberal governments of New South Wales and Tasmania have expressed concern that the federal religious discrimination bill trumps their anti-discrimination laws.

The core provisions of the Morrison government’s bill, including those protecting the beliefs and hiring practices of religious institutions, would trump state laws, potentially rendering the claims unworkable, they submitted. to a parliamentary inquiry.

The coalition is struggling to gain support for the bill, with a trio of moderate Liberal MPs reserving the right to vote against and a deal between the attorney general and another group of disgruntled MPs crumbling after a religious backlash.

The bill is being examined by two parliamentary inquiries, including the Joint Human Rights Commission.

Tasmanian Attorney General Elise Archer submitted that the federal bill appeared to “effectively invalidate the operation of Tasmania’s anti-discrimination law”, including the provision prohibiting speech that offends, insults or humiliates a person on the basis of the law. base of a protected attribute.

Archer argued that a person need only claim that their statement was a protected belief statement and that the Tasmanian Anti-Discrimination Tribunal “must decline to hear the case” unless the request is specious. .

Although the person who made the statement was not required to prove that it was a statement of conviction, the complainant would be required to prove that he or she breached the guarantees in the bill that de such statements should not be malicious, intimidating or harassing, she said.

“I would like to reiterate that the view of the Government of Tasmania is [the package] would reduce the ability of the Tasmanian Anti-Discrimination Tribunal to deal with certain complaints and… we continue to advocate strongly not to weaken our anti-discrimination laws. “

New South Wales Premier Dominic Perrottet has openly questioned the need for the federal bill.

Anti-Discrimination NSW, the state government body that administers the discrimination law, said it “remains concerned” that the bill does not strike the right balance between freedom of religion and other rights.

He warned that the Religious Discrimination Bill would override provisions in state law “which limit the circumstances in which denominational schools can discriminate against job applicants and existing employees.”

The conviction statement and the hiring clauses “would also create significant procedural and access to justice problems,” he said, as the NSW Civil and Administrative Court may not be competent to consider state claims when federal law is raised as a defense.

Referral of the case to federal court would add “procedural and financial burdens to complainants and create a barrier to access to justice.”

Constitutional law professor Anne Twomey argued that the federal government had attempted a “provocative” takeover of state law, but the drafting was “conceptually confused and probably invalid.”

Both sections “seek to control the functioning of state law,” she argued, rather than simply creating incompatibility with state law.

“How can a Commonwealth law dictate the interpretation of what constitutes discrimination under a state law?”

“He can’t do it. He cannot amend or alter state law or instruct a court on how to interpret state law.

The Australian Catholic Bishops’ Conference has praised the bill, saying it “does not go far enough” to ensure the protection of religious freedom. The conference accused state governments, including Victoria, of seeking to restrict the hiring and firing powers of religious institutions.

The Australian Human Rights Commission has said it “strongly supports the introduction of enforceable protections against religious discrimination for all people in Australia”.

But while endorsing these elements of the bill, he warned that other articles “would offer protection to religious belief or activity to the detriment of other rights.”

Sign up to receive the best stories from Guardian Australia every morning

These were “unnecessary and disproportionate, or are otherwise incompatible with international human rights law” and should be deleted, he said.

In addition to the statement of belief clause, the AHRC complained that the bill “provides very broad exemptions that allow ‘religious bodies’ to engage in religious discrimination” and allows companies to file a complaint of religious discrimination.

“This is a significant departure from national and international human rights laws which only protect the rights of individuals, ie humans. “


]]>
The 10 best documentaries of 2021 https://helviti.com/the-10-best-documentaries-of-2021/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/the-10-best-documentaries-of-2021/ The documentary form in 2021 was shaped almost exclusively by studies of individual characters. It could be a by-product of celebrity culture, where Twitter and television made people often more curious about famous strangers than their own parents. It could even be the result of the coronavirus pandemic, indicating a desire to know someone’s life […]]]>


The documentary form in 2021 was shaped almost exclusively by studies of individual characters. It could be a by-product of celebrity culture, where Twitter and television made people often more curious about famous strangers than their own parents. It could even be the result of the coronavirus pandemic, indicating a desire to know someone’s life and be a fly on their walls during the months of quarantine and social distancing.

Whatever the reason, intimate character studies have dominated the documentary landscape this year. Seven of the year’s top ten documentaries explore the lives and careers of diverse people, from volatile actors, famous footballers, dirty comics, celebrity bosses, human rights activists, and young and old musicians. These personal stories are crucial for a changing society.

So much is happening in this unrestrained culture, and the ‘individual’ is easily swept aside and forgotten in important national and global processes like climate change, coronavirus, #MeToo, Black Lives Matter, to only cite a few. Life went really fast in 2021, so it’s a real treat when you can slow down and meet interesting people through great art. Documentaries thus frame the familiar and prompt audiences to notice something different from noise, reminding viewers of the vast array of great stories so often missed among us. These are the ten best documentaries of 2021.

ten Pele



Pele
Netflix

Football, or American football, is the most popular sport in the world, and Pelé is arguably its most popular player; he’s tied with Diego Maradona for FIFA’s Player of the Century, after all. A football fan’s dream, the documentary Pele details the titular legend (born Edson Arantes do Nascimento) through many of his key games and goals, placing it in the context of Brazilian history from 1950 to 1970. The man had such a rich and varied life that it makes sense that the film is mostly limited to Pelé’s football career, with this narrative device allowing audiences to follow the GOAT on his journey through what he loves. His passion and ability to Pele could even turn the enemies of “football” into believers.

9 Pray far away



Pray far away
Netflix

Religions have often made terrible choices based on phobias and fears, with some of the worst concerning LGBTQ + people and in particular ‘conversion therapy. ‘ Pray far away documents this abusive and bogus practice from the perspective of those who preached and lived it, revealing how easy it is to sell a lie on behalf of God and his family. Religion itself is not to the test here, but rather the intolerance of institutions, mega-church leaders and televangelists who spouted hateful rhetoric that has kept generations of people fearful of their own identities. . Using dated images and current interviews with an interesting and subtle editing system, the film follows supporters and deniers through different phases of their beliefs, detailing the psychological (and sometimes physical) torture suffered by the movement “pray homosexuals”. It is certainly only a prospect; a more queer, more radical documentary remains to be done, but in the meantime Pray far away is a necessary and difficult reminder that these traumas exist and must be treated.


8 Val



Val
Amazon Studios

Perhaps the most artistically ambitious and innovative biographical documentaries of the year, Val reviews the life and works of actor Val Kilmer, who casts a strange shadow over the whole affair – he writes the narration himself, which is read by his son due to the loss of Kilmer’s voice because of cancer; he is lounging, looking at pictures of himself; he becomes a philosopher on acting and art. His participation in the film makes everything much more metafictional and weird, but also surprisingly direct. The film never shies away from Kilmer’s egocentric and at times violent behavior, and is painfully genuine in documenting his disappointment with the turn of his life. Weird, seductive and brilliant, Val is a great experimental biography, warts and all.

Related: Val Trailer Explores Val Kilmer’s Career Through Home Movies Ahead of Cannes Debut


seven Roadrunner: a film about Anthony Bourdain



Roadrunner
Focus Features

Anthony Bourdain had been in front of the cameras for decades before his tragic death, so it was oddly heartwarming to be able to posthumously spend time with the legend and those who knew him at Roadrunner: a film about Anthony Bourdain. One of the few chefs who was more personally interesting than his meals (and to say the least), the dark and troubled but brilliant Bourdain is simply magnetic to watch. Morgan Neville is quickly becoming one of the best documentary filmmakers of his time, and his expertise in deconstructing artists (especially in the highest-grossing biographical documentary of all time, Won’t you be my neighbor) is fullscreen in the poll, melancholy Roadrunner, which almost looks like a sad but beautiful wake after the death of a dear friend.


6 Billie Eilish: The world is a bit hazy



Billie Eilish The world is a little blurry
Neon / AppleTV +

RJ Cutler was in the right place at the right time when he started filming the early career of pop star Billie Eilish. It captures the carefree first moments of the singer composing and performing with her brother in her bedroom, unaware that more cameras than Cutler’s were about to intrude into her life every moment of the day. day before. The world is a little blurry follows Eilish through it all, and it’s often painful to see someone so young and introspective being thrown into such a demanding, high-energy world. Cutler is wise to keep his distance most of the time, just observing Eilish and letting her be herself, which record companies and fans don’t often. The result is a deeply intimate look at one of the greatest musical acts of recent years, and the cost of that success.

Related: Billie Eilish Lives Her Dream Happier Than Ever: Los Angeles Love Letter Trailer

5 The Sparks Brothers



The Sparks Brothers
Focus Features

The Sparks Group has had an exciting year. Ron and Russell Mael, the duo behind the music, appeared as themselves in Leos Carax’s baffling musical Annette with Adam Driver, but it’s Edgar Wright (of Shaun of the Dead and Baby Driver glory) who best documents them in his film The Sparks Brothers. While Wright is as ever bombastic as ever with his playful and alluring direction, and the delicious music infects the film with earworms, it’s the brothers themselves who steal the show here. Witty and charming, it’s just a joy to watch the underrated Mael engulf every scene he’s in, and audiences are lucky to hang out with them.

Related: Annette The final trailer plunges Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard into a tidal wave of love


4 The rescue



The rescue
Greenwich Entertainment

The year’s most poignant documentary brings together footage from the 2018 Tham Luang cave rescue and combines them with artful reconstructions. Couple Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin are no strangers to extremely tense and daring physical acts, having won the Oscar for their documentary Free Solo, and are ready for another appointment with The rescue, which looks at the 18 Days from the perspective of the motley group of fans who have come together to save an association junior football team. The directors form a day-to-day narrative, accentuating the drama of this almost unbelievable, miraculous story, and it all plays out like a great fictional movie.

3 Hate Peter Tatchell



Hate Peter Tatchell
Netflix

Peter Tatchell was not a household name, but I hope the 2021 documentary about the activist will change all of that through his exploration of his life as an activist spanning more than half a century since he was a teenager. . Legendary and inspiring, Tatchell was the first person to organize a protest for gay rights in a communist country, was violently assaulted hundreds of times, and was infamous beaten and arrested by Russian forces in 2007. Dividing in his confrontational style and often antagonistic approach (like the time he rushed to the stage of a church sermon in protest), equally despised and worshiped, Tatchell is the perfect subject for an activism documentary – complex, difficult, urgent, necessary, angry and passionate, it is all on display in Hate Peter Tatchell.


2 Patrice O’Neal: Killing is easy



Patrice O Neal Killin is easy
Central comedy

Patrice O’Neal died so young, but he was a comedian who “killed” or who did so well that his audience often burst out laughing; he was more interested, however, in being himself. “Killing is easy,” a friend said, “but that’s not what he wanted. He wanted the truth.” Combining years of O’Neal’s stand-up career with extremely direct conversations with family, friends and a fiancé, Killing is easy documents one of the greatest but also troubled and complicated comedians of all time. Although he was hilarious, he was also arrogant, sexist, rude and difficult to work with. His friends in the comedy scene might have liked him, but they’re quite honest that “he screwed a ** hole”, as one comic puts it; O’Neal would hardly disagree, often saying “I am a complete misogynist” and wondering why anyone would be with him. The price of authenticity is on display here, with the extremely genuine and genuine O’Neal alienating so many around him without ever compromising his identity. “To stand upright is to dissect humanity and the faults of being human,” said a woman in Killing is easy, and by that characterization, the film is beautifully human.


1 Summer of the soul



Soul-Summer-2
Projector photos / Hulu

While Woodstock was celebrated as one of the most cultural events of the last century, it took the directorial debut of Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson for people to see the deep meaning of Harlem Cultural Festival of the same year. Questlove brings together nearly 50 hours of obscure and forgotten footage from 1969, combined with news footage and interviews to tell a quintessential story about this cultural moment from a black perspective. The musicians in the film (who often watch and comment on each other 60 years ago) are brilliantly fiery – Gladys Knight, Mavis Staples, Stevie Wonder, Mahalia Jackson, Nina Simone, Sly Stone, BB King and Billy Davis, Jr. perform emotional interpretations of classics, and it’s amazing to see them all in one place. Summer of the soul is the block party of the year.


10 best real crime documentaries on Netflix, ranked

10 best real crime documentaries on Netflix, ranked

With a colorful mix of feature films and limited-series documentaries, Netflix has pretty much reinvented the true crime genre and crushed its competition in the latter half of the past decade.

Read more


About the Author


]]>
Religion, Law and Morals in Society | Letters https://helviti.com/religion-law-and-morals-in-society-letters/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 05:06:02 +0000 https://helviti.com/religion-law-and-morals-in-society-letters/ THE EDITOR, Madam: I agree with my friend Kevin Browne and join him in his letter to the editor ( Nation of Barbadosn, November 30, 2021) concerning law / morals in society. Just recently (October 25) Professor Stephen Vasciannie invited me and two lawyers as guest speakers in his class and part of our presentation […]]]>


THE EDITOR, Madam:

I agree with my friend Kevin Browne and join him in his letter to the editor ( Nation of Barbadosn, November 30, 2021) concerning law / morals in society.

Just recently (October 25) Professor Stephen Vasciannie invited me and two lawyers as guest speakers in his class and part of our presentation related to religion and law in society.

Below is my presentation, in part: –

For our purposes, I treat religion at a minimum as an orientation / perspective that recognizes a “higher power”, or God, to whom humans are responsible in regards to behavior. Reject even this minimal approach and humans in community become the final arbiters of morality and justice. I will shortly mention the complaint of law professor Arthur Leff in this regard.

Some quotes on the right to meditate:

1. “The positive laws of any society enshrine or at least reflect somewhat the ethical-moral perspective or the highest aspirations of society. The statutes are ipso facto moral censors. {So we don’t just legislate on morality, we also try to enforce it). This is from my old Jamaican Theological Seminary classmate 1978 batch Albert Morris in personal correspondence.

2. “… Since any law necessarily reflects some system of moral values, there is every reason to ensure that it reflects the correct value system. (Prof John Warwick Montgomery in his book Human rights and human dignity.)

3. “I find that the wisest men have been of the opinion that the law is not a product of human thought, nor a law of peoples, but something eternal which governs the whole universe by its wisdom in command and prohibition. Thus, they have been used to saying that the law is the primordial and ultimate spirit of God. (Roman Stoic lawyer Cicero (106-43 BC), From Legibus, Bk 2, chap 4)

4. “The problem of establishing sound ethical standards in the legal profession and the larger problem of which this is only one aspect – that of finding ethical standards for the assessment of substantive law in general – is becoming immeasurable. more acute when we see total societies operating with legal and ethical values ​​directly opposed to our own. (Prof JW Montgomery)

5. “I want to believe – and you too – in a complete, transcendent and immanent set of propositions on good and evil, findable rules which guide us with authority and without ambiguity on the way of living with righteousness. I also want to believe – and so do you – in no such thing, but rather that we are completely free, not only to choose for ourselves what we should do, but to decide for ourselves, individually and as a species, what we should be. What we want, God helps us, is both to be perfectly governed and perfectly free, that is to say at the same time to discover good and good and to create it. (“Indescribable ethics, law against nature”, Duke Law Journal 6 (December 1979.)

REV CLINTON CHISHOLM

Retired Jamaican Baptist Union

Pastor


]]>
Is there an Ijma (consensus)? (ten) https://helviti.com/is-there-an-ijma-consensus-ten/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 07:14:24 +0000 https://helviti.com/is-there-an-ijma-consensus-ten/ Dr Feisal Abdul Rauf Founder and CEO of the American Society for Muslim Advancement (ASMA Society) and Imam of Masjid Al-Farah in New York. Among his books are: Islam: a search for meaning, and Islam: a sacred law(what every Muslim should know about Sharia) and What’s Right with Islam: A New Vision for Muslims and […]]]>


Dr Feisal Abdul Rauf

Founder and CEO of the American Society for Muslim Advancement (ASMA Society) and Imam of Masjid Al-Farah in New York. Among his books are: Islam: a search for meaning, and Islam: a sacred law(what every Muslim should know about Sharia) and What’s Right with Islam: A New Vision for Muslims and the West.

In his book What’s Right With Islam: A New Vision for Muslims and the West, Dr Rauf analyzed the issue of riba, usury and interest and explained how the rejection of interest and the slow adoption by society, based on the feature of limited liability, has had a negative impact. on the economic development of Muslim countries.

Dr Khaleel Mohammed

Dr Mohammed, also known as Abu Yusuf Khaleel Al-Corentini, studied Islam (majoring in law) in Saudi Arabia, Syria and Yemen according to the Sunni, Shiite, and Zaydi madhaahib respectively. His doctorate is in Islamic law (Sharia) from McGill University. His scholarly works include writings on eschatology, Islamic belief and practice, and translations of religious literature by other scholars. He is currently Professor of Religious Studies at San Diego State University.

In response to a question put to him, he wrote:

“The Quran orders that we should not consume riba “Several times” (3: 130). This expression is due to the fact that, according to the mufassirs, when someone borrowed money in the pre-Islamic period and promised to pay it off within one year, at the end of that period he would be asked for the amount owed by him. If he couldn’t pay it, he would get a one-year extension, but the amount owed to him would be doubled – “da’fMeans “to double,” hence verse 3: 130. And if at the end of that second year he could not pay, the amount owed would be doubled again, meaning that the amount of the amortization would have been, in many cases, exponentially several times the principal amount of the loan. ready. It was this practice that was known as “riba“, and which can, in today’s terms, mean usurp or usurp credit.” [For the complete question and answer]

Maher Hathout, Uzma Jamil, Gasser Hathout and Nayyer Ali

In a book In pursuit of justice: the jurisprudence of human rights in Islam, the above authors argue:

“We maintain that the Qur’an does not impose equity on debt financing and allows transactions that are mutually beneficial. The Usury Verse is not the only verse in the Quran on business. Much more important in the Quran is the command to engage in honest affairs, especially to give full measure. More specifically, the Koran says: Woe to those who cheat; those who, when they are to receive by measure from men, demand the full measure – but when they are to give by measure or weight to men, give less than they are due (Quran 83: 1-3). This order requires that both parties to any business transaction pay the full and fair value of what they purchase. Failure to do so is a profound violation of Quranic business principles. Debt financing, when carried out in accordance with this principle, is permitted. When the lender gets more than he is entitled to, he commits the sin of usury. When he gets less, he engages in charity. But charity is a voluntary act, not an obligatory act in commercial transactions. “

Conclusion

This essay is under development. More to add, and the above entries would be updated again. If you have any additional information, please contact me.

There are many scholars, experts and professionals in the field of Islamic economics and finance, IMHO, do not believe in riba-equation of interest. For example, read the book Islamic Finance in the Global Economy [Edinburgh University Press, 2000] by Ibrahim Warde, and see if his personal position on the issue of riba-the equation of interest can be determined. There are also many non-Muslim scholars and experts working in this field. As examples, we can read the work of Clement Henry and Rodney Wilson, Philip Molyneux, et al. (their works are cited in the bibliography), and, again, see if their personal position on the riba-the equation of interest can be determined. A close friend of mine is a professor of finance, author of several books and nearly a dozen refereed publications on Islamic finance, and frequently attends relevant conferences around the world. Almost a year ago I asked him that I had read most of your books, but nowhere could I determine your position on the riba-interest equation. What he explained was interesting. He mentioned that he mainly does empirical work, where he does not need to take or state his own position on such a fundamental issue. He also pointed out what has happened to other scholars who have publicly taken a position at odds with the Orthodox position. I also know closely another senior finance professor, who at one time was chairman of the economics group of the Association of Muslim Social Scientists (AMSS) in the United States. He is one of the most prolific contributors in the field. However, due to its position of non-equivalence, it no longer receives invitations to any of these funded conferences.

Anyway, as illustrated above, far from having unanimous agreement or Ijma, there is considerable disagreement in this regard. Wider agreement would be found in previous work before the emergence of the modern banking system. At that time, the discourse revolved around Riba and its different types. However, as the discourse has shifted towards assimilating the general interest in Riba over the past several centuries, there is still less agreement, and even less unanimity, on banning the interest in all its forms. It should be noted that those who disagree with a simple Riba-Interest equation may not have a uniform view or explanation as to why they disagree with the equation. However, a common thread for critics is that unless the financial transactions are abusive, i.e. usurious, the mutually agreed upon transactions or contracts are valid and lawful from an Islamic point of view.

The limited purpose of this essay was not to deal with the question of whether or not interest is prohibited from an Islamic point of view. The objective here is rather to establish concretely that there is no unanimous agreement or ijma about riba-Equation of interest.


]]>
Pakistan, EU reaffirm determination to protect religious freedom https://helviti.com/pakistan-eu-reaffirm-determination-to-protect-religious-freedom/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 08:46:14 +0000 https://helviti.com/pakistan-eu-reaffirm-determination-to-protect-religious-freedom/ ISLAMABAD: Pakistan and the European Union (EU) on Wednesday reaffirmed their determination to protect human rights as well as fundamental freedoms, with an emphasis on freedom of religion, religious tolerance and peaceful coexistence, and minority rights. The agreement was reached during a meeting between Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi and High Representative for Foreign Affairs […]]]>


ISLAMABAD:

Pakistan and the European Union (EU) on Wednesday reaffirmed their determination to protect human rights as well as fundamental freedoms, with an emphasis on freedom of religion, religious tolerance and peaceful coexistence, and minority rights.

The agreement was reached during a meeting between Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi and High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Vice-President of the European Commission (HR / VP) Josep Borrell during the 6th Round of the Strategic Dialogue European Union-Pakistan, said a statement released after the meeting.

During the meeting, FM Qureshi expressed his concerns over the growing trends of Islamophobic acts, xenophobia and religious intolerance around the world and the need for a joint resolution to counter them.

The EU official, on the other hand, raised concerns over the death penalty and the abuse of Pakistani blasphemy laws following the lynching of a Sri Lankan national in Sialkot on charges of crimes. allegations of blasphemy.

However, Borrell praised Pakistan for passing the Protection of Journalists and Media Professionals Bill and hoped that the Anti-Torture Bill and other human rights related laws would be passed soon. .

SPG-Plus Status

Qureshi and Borrell also expressed a strong political commitment to the GSP + and the implementation of 27 international conventions on human rights, labor rights, environmental protection and good governance that are linked to the treaty. commercial.

In addition, Qureshi and Borrell reviewed the ongoing cooperation between Pakistan and the EU on the basis of the Strategic Engagement Plan.

Read Peshawar judge orders blasphemy investigation against organizers of Women’s Day march

“They agreed to further strengthen the EU-Pakistan mutual engagement, in particular on regional security and cooperation,” the statement said, adding that they also agreed to hold the first meeting of the “new EU-security dialogue. Pakistan with sub-groups on non-proliferation and disarmament, and counter-terrorism in 2022 ”, indicates the press release from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The EU official also welcomed the progress made by Pakistan in implementing the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) action plans to move out of the gray list and the ongoing efforts to achieve well the remaining actions.

The representative of the EU welcomed the continued cooperation with Pakistan on electoral issues. “High Representative Borrell briefed Foreign Minister Qureshi on the upcoming monitoring visit of the EU Election Observation Mission to Pakistan in 2018,” the statement said.

Climate change

During the meeting, issues related to climate change and the importance of global action to counter the threat were also discussed.

The two envoys also discussed the importance for developed countries to take the lead in mobilizing climate finance, noting the important role of public and private funds, and technology in facilitating the transition.

According to the statement, Borrell welcomed Pakistan’s statement ahead of the Glasgow conference of its nationally determined contribution to achieving common climate goals.

Afghanistan

The envoys from Pakistan and the EU agreed on the importance of maintaining a sustained engagement with Afghanistan to promote stability and combat narcotics as well as the threat of terrorism.

“They expressed deep concern at the potential for an economic collapse and a significant worsening of the humanitarian crisis and a new influx of refugees,” the statement said, adding that Afghanistan’s serious liquidity problems strained legitimate banking services.

“They also agreed on the need to continue providing urgent and unhindered humanitarian aid and basic social service support to the Afghan people,” he added.

Read more EU welcomes Pakistan’s progress on GSP-related conventions

The envoys stressed the importance “of improving the socio-economic situation and preserving human rights, especially those of women and girls, and persons belonging to minorities,” the statement added.

The envoys from Pakistan and the EU supported the dialogue between the Afghan parties to achieve national reconciliation and stressed the importance of an inclusive and representative government, to improve the prospects for security and stability.

The representative of the EU thanked Pakistan for its support in the evacuation of EU nationals and the safe passage of people from Afghanistan.

Qureshi expressed Pakistan’s support for the inclusion of the EU in the regional political consultation mechanism on Afghanistan.

Rights violations in Kashmir

During the meeting, Qureshi reiterated Pakistan’s deep concerns over human rights violations by India in occupied Kashmir, and efforts to change the demographics of the disputed territory in violation of UNSC resolutions.

Borrell stressed that the EU is closely monitoring the human rights situation in Jammu and Kashmir. He reiterated the need to show restraint, defuse tensions and resolve the dispute through dialogue and constructive political and diplomatic engagement.

The EU envoy welcomed the February 2021 agreement between India and Pakistan for the observance of the ceasefire agreement on the line of control in Jammu and Kashmir and to engage through established mechanisms.


]]>