catholic church – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 21:09:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png catholic church – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 Religion Briefs, March 18 – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://helviti.com/religion-briefs-march-18-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 22:47:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/religion-briefs-march-18-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Rogue River Seventh-day Adventist Church The church, at 4300 N. River Road, Rogue River, will hold a service called “Armageddon, A Good Thing” at 6 p.m. on Friday, March 18. for more information, see rrsda.com. Shady Point Seventh-day Adventist Church The church, at 14611 Highway 62, will hold Bible studies for beginners and advanced at […]]]>

Rogue River Seventh-day Adventist Church

The church, at 4300 N. River Road, Rogue River, will hold a service called “Armageddon, A Good Thing” at 6 p.m. on Friday, March 18. for more information, see rrsda.com.

Shady Point Seventh-day Adventist Church

The church, at 14611 Highway 62, will hold Bible studies for beginners and advanced at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 19. A worship service will follow at 10:40 a.m. on Saturday. See spadventistchurch.com

Archangel Gabriel Orthodox Church

The church, at the Shoppes at exit 24, 205 Fern Valley Road, Suite Z, will hold a Vespers Service at 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 19. A divine liturgy service will be held at 9 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. A Feast of the Annunciation vigil will be held on Thursday, March 24 at 5 p.m. and the evening liturgy for the Feast of the Annunciation will be held on Friday, March 25 at 8 a.m. For more information, call 541-690-8822.

Westminster Presbyterian Church

The church, at 2000 Oakwood Drive, Medford, will hold in-person worship services at 9 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. The service will include a sermon titled “Fruitful in Peace.” WestKids Sunday School will be at 10:45 a.m. for children in grades one through six. Online service is offered at 9 a.m. Sunday on the church’s Facebook page and at wpcmedford.com. An in-person prayer service will be offered Wednesday, March 23 at 6:30 p.m. in the sanctuary. Dial 541-773-8274.

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church

The church, 1020 E. Main St., Medford, will hold an in-person Holy Communion service at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. A Bible study course for adults will follow. The Lenten Wednesday service will be at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 23. Audio recordings of the sermons are available at stpeterlutheran-medford.org. For information, call 541-772-4395.

Grace Lutheran Church

The church, at 660 Frances Lane, Ashland, will hold Sunday school at 9 a.m. on Sunday, March 20, followed by worship with communion afterwards at 10 a.m. Pastor Josh Heimbuck will deliver the homily and a coffee will follow. A Lenten service will be held at noon on Wednesday, March 23.

St. Martin’s Episcopal Church

The church, at 95 Cleveland St., Shady Cove, will hold indoor worship at 10 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Reverend Laura Sheridan-Campbell will officiate. The church asks those present to assess their own risk of COVID-19 infection and protect themselves accordingly. The church respects the wishes of those who may choose to remain masked, and the church will continue to make masks available at the door. For more information, call 541-878-2166 or email stmshadycove@gmail.com.

St. Andrews Anglican Church

The church, at 305 N. Fifth St., Jacksonville, will meet for Holy Communion at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Members of the St. Andrews Academy Youth Choir of Chester, Calif., will provide music during the service. A moment of conviviality and refreshments will follow the service. For more information, visit standrewsanglican.org.

First United Methodist Church of Medford

The church, at 607 W. Main St., Medford, will hold a service at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Guest speaker Bobbi Kidder will deliver a sermon entitled “Living Waters”. Child care is available during the service for children up to the second year. The church asks those present to wear a mask when entering the building. The church opens its pantry from 1 to 3 p.m. on Wednesdays. For more information, email churchoffice@medfordumchurch.org, call 541-773-3691, or visit medfordumchurch.org.

Central Point First Presbyterian Church

The church, at 456 W. Pine St., Central Point, will hold a worship service at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Masks are mandatory. For more information, call 541-664-1828.

Medford Unit

The spiritual center at 540 N. Holly St., will hold a joint service with the Center for Spiritual Living Rogue Valley at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Reverend Michelle Arellano of CSL will deliver a sermon titled “Belonging”. For more information, see unitymedford.com or cslroguevalley.org.

First Medford Presbyterian Church

The church, at 85 S. Holly St., Medford, will hold in-person worship at 11 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Face masks are optional. Find pre-recorded video services and additional information at firstpreschurchmedford.com. Free packed lunches are provided for the hungry from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday. For more information, call 541-779-1711.

Trinity Episcopal Church

The church, at 44 N. Second St., Ashland, will hold a Celtic Evening Service and Holy Communion at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 20. Proof of vaccination and masks are required to attend in person. Doors will open at 6:15 p.m. for a time of quiet meditation, and Kathleen Page will play the Celtic harp from 6:30 p.m. Reverend Janet Holland will lead a service of readings, poetry and music on the theme of the “Sacred Path”, and will examine both the Christian season of Lent and the Celtic season of Imbolc. the service will be recorded and then uploaded to the Trinity Ashland Episcopal Church Facebook page. For more information, call 541-201-3418 or email office@trinitychurchashland.org.

Sacred Heart Catholic Church

The church, 517 W. 10th St., Medford, offers Mass at 8:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday, with an 8 a.m. Rosary and Divine Mercy after Mass. Weekend services include confession on Saturday from 3 to 5:30 p.m., a vigil in English at 5:30 p.m. and in Spanish at 7 p.m. 30:30 p.m. in Spanish and 3:30 p.m. in Latin. During Lent, Confession will be offered at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Stations of the Cross services in English are at 5:30 p.m. on Fridays and in Spanish at 7 p.m. on Fridays. Soup dinners are offered at 6 p.m. on Fridays.

For more information, see Sacredheartmedford. org, Facebook.com/sacredheartmedford or call 541-779-4661.

Our Lady of Fatima

The Catholic Church, at 56 Williams Lane, Shady Cove, will offer confession from 9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Sunday, March 20 and Mass at 10 a.m. For more information, call 541-779-4661.

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Church and Vic – The Strand https://helviti.com/church-and-vic-the-strand/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 19:44:50 +0000 https://helviti.com/church-and-vic-the-strand/ When Canadian Methodists sought to establish a “Seminary of Learning” in 1830, they probably did not think their legacy would be a Toronto institution with coeducational residences and a secular education. Victoria University may no longer be a symbol of Methodist strength in Upper Canada, but its relationship with the Church over the past 186 […]]]>

When Canadian Methodists sought to establish a “Seminary of Learning” in 1830, they probably did not think their legacy would be a Toronto institution with coeducational residences and a secular education. Victoria University may no longer be a symbol of Methodist strength in Upper Canada, but its relationship with the Church over the past 186 years has been vibrant, To say the least.

In the British Empire at the start of the 19th century, religion was seen as a necessary companion to school learning. The question for Upper Canadian high schools was not if there would be a Christian teaching, but often which Christian teaching.

Canada’s intertwining with Christianity began with the voyages of Jacques Cartier and the establishment of New France in 1534. Cartier claimed an area of ​​land along the Gulf of St. Lawrence on behalf of the Roman Catholic Church of France, whom he sought to protect from the “wicked Lutherans, [and] apostates” – despite the land belonging to the Haudenosaunee Nation. Although Cartier was successful for a time, the colony finally collapsed in 1763, with the cession of New France to Great Britain.

The Church of England hoped to dominate the new territory. In 1791, the Crown reserved one-seventh of all public lands in Canada for Protestant clergy, but discovered a weakness in political popularity. Established French Catholics challenged English Protestants, as both groups dominated the country.

In the 1790s, a new player entered the game: United Empire Loyalists fleeing the United States came by the thousands to spread their gospel ways to the Canadian population. These Methodists hoped to prove themselves as a formidable group in the years before Confederation, gaining some popularity as the underdog.

A young Christian leader who was kicked out of his home at 18 for converting to Methodism had unwavering views on access to education; Egerton Ryerson criticizes clergy reserves, tuition fees, and Upper Canada’s decentralized education system. When the Methodist Conference was held in 1829 to discuss congregational plans, education was a top priority. The proposal for a Methodist seminary was drafted and tabled, but rejected by the Legislative Assembly and Council in an act of religious prejudice. Lieutenant Governor Colborne ruthlessly declared that “the system of education which has produced the best and ablest men in the United Kingdom will not be abandoned here to adapt to the limited views of the rulers of the societies, who do not may have neither experience nor judgment to appreciate the value or benefits of a liberal education.

Five years later, after an appeal to the British Crown and a trip to London, England by Ryerson, a charter was finally granted – the first charter given to a nonconformist body for an educational institution.

In 1836 Ryerson wrote to the officers of the Crown that “an institution whose chief object, as is plainly expressed, is the education of youth, of poor young men of religious character and promising talents, and young native Indians connected with Methodist congregations, should be placed substantially under the pastoral head of the Church. Ryerson’s obsession with the importance of Christianity in education led him to later play a role in Canada’s disastrous residential school system.

The Royal Charter of the Academy of Upper Canada boasted that “no religious test or qualification shall be required of, or appointed for, any person on admission as a student or scholar into the said Academy”. The newly created council provided for more equal admission of students – so long as they expressed a willingness to embrace Christian values.

It was a bold contrast to the sectarian model of Canadian education, which saw the founding of Bishop’s Anglican University in 1843, Presbyterian Queen’s College in 1841, Roman Catholic Regiopolis College in 1837 and Baptist Acadia College in 1839. Although Upper Canada Academy certainly joined the list as Canada’s Standard Methodist institution, its openness to applicants was unusual.

Although the academy’s willingness to accept native students and students of any Christian denomination was extremely progressive for its time, it was done, unsurprisingly, under the veil of indoctrination. The school was established by the Methodist Church with the aim of combining secular and religious studies, which they believed to be inseparable.

Similarly, female students were widely accepted in the school, with the 74 female student body of 1840 nearly equaling the 96 male. Although this policy was at the forefront of women’s education in Canada, it still existed within the framework of educational inequality and school segregation, food and housing – the latter two having existed in Vic until 1988 and 1995, respectively.

Vic’s transformation of Upper Canada Academy into Victoria College in 1841 saw little change in the religious model of the school until the addition of the Faculty of Theology in 1871. But this period also saw the revocation of the admission of female students, who had previously been welcomed from 1836 to 1841. Many clergymen believed that women should assume a traditional “housewife” role after attending high school, that post-secondary institutions should be for men only. Once Victoria became a degree-granting institution, it followed in the footsteps of other colleges of the day and excluded women from admission. This thirty-year stain was not reversed until the year theology was introduced as a faculty.

In 1903, Margaret Addison’s first year as Dean of Annesley Hall, the “…majority [of the students] were Methodists or Presbyterians, a sprinkle of Anglicans, Baptists and “others” stirred the mix; all professed some sort of religious belief, and for many it was the cornerstone of their lives. A proper religious lifestyle was essential for Addison and the administrators of Victoria College when establishing the first women’s residence hall in Canada; the sectarian views of the Church were reflected in Victoria’s principles and actions. Margaret Proctor Burwash, founding member of the Annesley Hall Building Committee, said: “The higher education of women brings a curse instead of a blessing unless it gives them a higher ideal of nobility and sanctity of their vocation as housewives. Burwash and Addison struggled against the progressive views of students on the one hand and the beliefs of authoritarian Methodist men on the other. During her tenure as dean (until 1931), Addison’s efforts to grant independence and responsibility to girls often met with opposition. Albert Carman, General Superintendent of the Methodist Church, heard from Chancellor Nathanael Burwash about the Dean’s ‘night watch keys’ for girls, students returning to their rooms after ‘after midnight’ entertainment, their ‘attendance to theaters and dances” and replied, “It is not Methodism: I fear it is aloof: it is not the way of sound discipline or sound and sure scholarship …” Margaret Addison’s desire to bend the rules and give more autonomy to the Victoria Women’s Student Union contributed to Mr and Mrs Burwash’s resignations from the school in 1913, as they faced the pressure from Methodist Church leaders like Carman.

It was not until Methodists joined with a group of Presbyterians and Congregationalists to form the United Church of Canada in 1925 that Vic saw drastic changes for his Methodist men. Disputes over the union of the Church and Presbyterian Knox College eventually led to the establishment of Emmanuel College in 1928, which formalized Victoria’s existing religious education into a separate institution. However, it would be naïve to say that this removed the Christian undertones from Victoria’s student life entirely.

Since its inception as a college, Vic has seen Christian values ​​and theological lectures mixed with students’ liberal arts studies, with many Victoria graduates entering the ministry themselves. Each of the early directors and presidents had been affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church in some capacity, and most of them had been ordained ministers. Even in the late 19th and 20th centuries, this student-minister-administrator pipeline held true for Samuel Nelles, Nathanael Burwash, Richard P. Bowles, Edward W. Wallace, and Northrop Frye. As recently as 1992 to 1998, Sang Chul Lee served as Chancellor of Victoria College. An advocate for oppressed groups in the Church, Lee served as the thirty-second Moderator of The United Church of Canada. Grace before meals, the celebration of exclusively Christian holidays, and the sentiment of faculty and students maintained institutional Christian ties through much of the 20th century.

Today, the influence of the United Church of Victoria is at its lowest. Emmanuel College now teaches a wide variety of theologies, ranging from Islamic, Buddhist, Hindu, and Indigenous belief systems; fewer administrators than ever have ties to the United Church. In 2008, the United Church Archives were finally separated from the Victoria University Archives, which had been housed together since their origins. However, 13 of the 37 people appointed to the Board of Regents remain members of The United Church of Canada, and an annual grant of $200,000 from the Church has been given to Vic through 2019.

Although we may no longer share the same values ​​or perspectives as Albert Carman or Egerton Ryerson, Victoria’s story of adversity and religious significance offers a more holistic view of the Vic we know today. As Vic and Emmanuel alumnus, United Church minister, Principal and Chancellor Northrop Frye said, “Victoria has a legacy and that legacy is not buried treasure or a handed down secret, but an experience renewed by all who come into contact with him. ”

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Rabbi ‘queering’ religion at San Francisco Jesuit Catholic University https://helviti.com/rabbi-queering-religion-at-san-francisco-jesuit-catholic-university/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 13:16:44 +0000 https://helviti.com/rabbi-queering-religion-at-san-francisco-jesuit-catholic-university/ J. The Jewish News of Northern California via JTA — Since becoming rabbi-in-residence at the University of San Francisco in 2019, Rabbi Camille Angel has been busy creating inclusive spaces on campus, giving classes, organizes Jewish life cycle events or conducts Passover Seder. All this in a day’s work for a campus rabbi, perhaps, but […]]]>

J. The Jewish News of Northern California via JTA — Since becoming rabbi-in-residence at the University of San Francisco in 2019, Rabbi Camille Angel has been busy creating inclusive spaces on campus, giving classes, organizes Jewish life cycle events or conducts Passover Seder.

All this in a day’s work for a campus rabbi, perhaps, but its impact is felt far beyond the university’s Jewish community.

When Angel’s hiring was announced, it made headlines. A Jesuit Catholic University appointing a rabbi in residence was unprecedented, especially when that rabbi is a lifelong lesbian and LGBTQ activist.

“I was trained and am a rabbi to serve Jews, and I do — I led a shiva two nights ago, so I’m still serving Jews,” Angel told J. ” But there is something remarkable to me and totally unexpected about my rabbinate being primarily among non-Jews at this point and my teaching being primarily with non-Jews.

According to Angel, there is only one Jewish student in his class of 40 “Queering Religion”. The other students represent a mix of religious affiliations, but gravitate to Angel’s courses and programs because of the inclusive queer community she has cultivated on campus.

“I actually didn’t know much about Judaism and what a rabbi was or what he did,” said Jade Peñafort, a sociology student from Redwood City. “But honestly, I love it. I learned from her that in Judaism some of the core values ​​are just about working with other people and for other people and as a community. not just acting on your own.

Angel said it was important to her to be a visibly Jewish and queer presence on campus, inside and outside the classroom. She regularly wears an embroidered yarmulke and keeps a rainbow pride flag displayed in her office window. She underscores how important real representation and inclusion is, especially when many students have never interacted with Judaism or Jewish thought or even met a rabbi.

Illustrative: A person talks on the phone during an annual Gay Pride Parade in Jerusalem, June 3, 2021. (Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)

“Students often ask me, ‘What should I call you? Professor? Doctor? The Rabbi?’ said Angel. “I tell them to call me a rabbi, because everyone needs a rabbi, and if you didn’t have one before, now you have one.”

Before joining the University Ministry staff of seven as an on-campus rabbi, Angel taught at USF for several years in the Swig Jewish Studies and Social Justice program, which she largely credits. party to his presence on campus.

Ordained as a rabbi at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, Angel places a strong emphasis on being a positive, identity-affirming spiritual advisor, regardless of student backgrounds or belief systems. Angel finds that many of her students’ relationships with religion are often complicated by negative experiences due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. But they are also curious and find out for themselves if they want to explore spirituality.

“When I was teaching my first [theology] class, I met so many people who had been really damaged and hurt by religion, or who had chosen not to be associated with religion, because they could see that it hurt the people they loved,” Angel said. According to USF, the majority of undergraduate students are not affiliated with any religion, while others identify as Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, atheist, or Protestant. Less than half are Catholic.

I met so many people who had been really damaged and hurt by religion

According to a 2020 study by The Trevor Project, young LGBTQ adults whose parents held negative religious beliefs about homosexuality were twice as likely to attempt suicide.

In her Queering Religion course, Angel teaches from a Jewish perspective how to navigate religious contexts, especially religions that have often attempted to deny queer people. Many students credit Angel and this class with helping them reevaluate and reconnect with their respective spiritual traditions.

This was the case of Luis Anaya, a sociology student, for whom growing up Mexican-American and Catholic went hand in hand, but being queer and Catholic, not so much.

“I had a lot of reservations about religion because growing up and being queer, I naturally had a different experience and a different perspective on Catholic teachings,” said Anaya, who was born in Mexico City but grew up in Stockholm.

When he took Angel’s course, he said, he was also progressing in exploring and navigating his queer identity, so the intersection of queer narratives and spirituality was particularly meaningful to him. him. He also said exposure to Jewish thought helped mend his strained relationship with Catholicism.

“Rabbi Angel talks a lot about pluralism, how different identities can co-exist at the same time, and the idea of ​​not reading the text literally, but rather interpreting it to get a better perspective of what these people were trying writing and the messages they were trying to convey,” Anaya said. “Questioning things and approaching them almost with a grain of salt.”

Illustrative: An in-person mass at Christ the King Catholic Church in San Antonio, Texas, May 19, 2020. (AP/Eric Gay)

Peñafort had a similar experience. Raised Catholic, she stopped going to church as a teenager. She says she struggled with Catholicism for several reasons, but especially when her older sister came out as queer. She says the tools she learned in Angel’s course helped her understand how to deal with her conflicting beliefs around religion. Peñafort says Angel’s class also helped her feel comfortable exploring her own sexuality and identity as a Filipina woman and sister.

“Even though I felt like I didn’t fit Catholicism and its values, I was still able to take little bits and apply them to myself or just reframe them in a way that applied to me. , to my life and my identity,” Peñafort said.

With Angel as the facilitator, Anaya and several other students have created a peer-led LGBTQ group on campus called “Qmmunity,” which Anaya describes as a sort of extension of Angel’s class and the Jewish values ​​she holds. teaches. On Thursdays, the group hosts a lunch program called “Breaking Bread and the Binary,” in which students come together to share a meal, thoughts, and reflections on current events.

The first session of this semester was held on January 27, Holocaust Remembrance Day and shortly after the January 15 hostage crisis in Colleyville, Texas. Angel expressed how important the gathering was and how it reminded him of the importance of creating inclusive spaces not just for Jewish students, but for all marginalized people.

“To be in this group out and proud, here and queer, on the lawn in front of the church, it is the greatest satisfaction that Hitler and the Nazis, fascism and fundamentalism do not rule our lives,” said Angel the next day, reflecting on the session. “We are here, together, and we won’t be afraid to go back to our respective closets.”

A law enforcement vehicle stands outside the Congregation Beth Israel Synagogue, January 16, 2022 in Colleyville, Texas. (Brandon Bell/Getty Images/AFP)

Next month, Angel will host the first Alvin H. Baum Jr. Memorial Lecture, honoring the San Francisco philanthropist known as a community pillar in the Jewish, civil rights and gay communities who died last year. In April, she leads a social justice-centered interfaith Passover Seder that focuses on the themes of climate justice, interfaith solidarity, peace, health, and freedom. She also plans to expand community outreach to address the problem of food insecurity among college students, which affects LGBTQ people twice as much as others, according to the US Census Bureau.

Throughout, his main focus is the intersection of religion and homosexuality.

“I think it’s so refreshing to hear a different point of view,” Peñafort said, “and even though it’s based on a religious point of view, it’s not necessarily so. the impression that she is a very wise woman, a mentor and a friend.

This article originally appeared in J. The Jewish News of Northern California, and is reprinted with permission.

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Interfaith Scholar in Residence Program Begins March 3 | Local News https://helviti.com/interfaith-scholar-in-residence-program-begins-march-3-local-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 21:21:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/interfaith-scholar-in-residence-program-begins-march-3-local-news/ Neighbors come in all shapes, ethnicities and religious traditions. And faith can make good neighbors. That’s the overarching theme of “Building Bridges With My Neighbor,” an upcoming series of presentations offered by the Kenosha Interfaith Scholar in Residence program from March 3-6. A church, temple, college and mosque are the settings for the lectures that […]]]>

Neighbors come in all shapes, ethnicities and religious traditions.

And faith can make good neighbors.

That’s the overarching theme of “Building Bridges With My Neighbor,” an upcoming series of presentations offered by the Kenosha Interfaith Scholar in Residence program from March 3-6.

A church, temple, college and mosque are the settings for the lectures that will be presented by Amir Hussain, the 2022 Kenosha Interfaith Fellow-in-Residence.

Hussain is president and professor of theological studies at Loyola Marymount University, the Jesuit college in Los Angeles. He gives courses on Islam and comparative religion.

Interfaith program

The Interfaith Scholar in Residence program is offered every two years and this is the third year it has been held in Kenosha, according to Rabbi Dena Feingold, a committee member and one of the program’s hosts.

The program began at the suggestion of Beth Hillel congregation member Rabbi Michael Remson, who had the idea of ​​bringing well-known religious speakers to the Kenosha community.

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Feingold noted that this year’s event is dedicated to Remson, who passed away in January 2020.

In previous years, clergy partners have included St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church and Holy Rosary Catholic Church.

Through congregational donations and grants, interfaith partners raise the funds necessary to pay the scholar-in-residence to travel and stay in Kenosha.

scholarship 2022

Hussain was recruited for this year’s series by Fatih Harpci, an associate professor of religion at Carthage College and a member of the Interfaith Scholar in Residence team.

When the Interfaith Scholars Committee decided it was time to bring in a renowned Muslim speaker as an Interfaith Scholar from Kenosha, and Hussain was at the top of Harpci’s list of nominees.

As a representative of the Islamic Center, Harpci also hoped to bring the American-Albanian Islamic Center of Wisconsin into this year’s program.

“I wanted Amir to carry out interfaith activities as a means of discerning and reaffirming our common universal religious and human values,” he said.

Conference themes

Through a series of four lectures, Hussain hopes to enlighten his audience in several ways.

“Part of that is the educational part, even some recent Muslim immigrants may not know these stories. The second thing is about the interfaith connection. Let’s talk about some of those connections.

Hussain is particularly excited about his March 4 lecture “Muslims and Media Images” at the Albanian American Islamic Center. “I want to emphasize that while we need doctors and lawyers, (the Muslim community) needs more journalists and artists to tell our stories.”

Feingold notes that this year two of the conferences will be held in the context of worship services, Saturday, March 5 at Temple Beth Hillel and Sunday, March 6 at First United Methodist Church.

“It’s about giving the community an interfaith experience that may be different from their own worship tradition,” she said.

Important dialogue

“In today’s world, programs like this are vital, and not just a luxury, for Kenosha and other communities, as interfaith dialogue promises to bring increased cooperation and understanding,” he said. said Harpci.

“We shine a light of awareness because people may not know each other,” Hussain said.

“Through learning and understanding, we have the opportunity to see people in a new light, not just as a group that we can stereotype, but to see how much we have in common with our neighbors from other confessions,” Feingold said.

For his part, Hussain says he is just the catalyst for new interfaith discussions. “I’m happy to help make connections, but those on the ground will be the ones to keep them going,” he said.

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Create a culture and a religious faith https://helviti.com/create-a-culture-and-a-religious-faith/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 20:34:03 +0000 https://helviti.com/create-a-culture-and-a-religious-faith/ Recently, I came across a very good definition of culture. It’s from sociologist Clifford Geertz. Describing a culture, he wrote the following: “A historically transmitted pattern of meanings embodied in symbols, a system of inherited conceptions expressed in symbolic forms by means of which men communicate, perpetuate and develop their knowledge and attitudes towards life.” […]]]>

Recently, I came across a very good definition of culture. It’s from sociologist Clifford Geertz. Describing a culture, he wrote the following:

“A historically transmitted pattern of meanings embodied in symbols, a system of inherited conceptions expressed in symbolic forms by means of which men communicate, perpetuate and develop their knowledge and attitudes towards life.”

Thinking about Geertz’s definition, I think I belong to several different cultures. This is probably the case for the readers of this column. For example, I belong to the culture of the United States, to the culture of New York, to the culture of the Roman Catholic Church and perhaps to other cultures.

Some of these cultures nourish my religious faith and others do not. The thought came to me that I have to choose carefully what will help me as a Christian believer and what will not help me. Above all, I need to be aware of patterns of meaning that actually contradict what I believe as a Catholic.

I usually, because of my own interests, ask my friends two questions: “Are you reading something interesting? and “Have you seen any good movies on TV?” A friend of mine almost always answers both questions with the comment “Just junk”. The comment saddens me. If you’re going to read, why only read junk? Why not read something that will enrich you, help you understand yourself and others, and even help you better understand the mystery of God? Finding such books or movies may take a bit of research in a culture that is very secular, but there are certainly many books and movies that can enrich a person’s religious faith.

Over the past 30 years, certainly from the time I started teaching at St. John’s University, I have been involved in two apostolates which have greatly enriched my faith and I hope for the faith of those who have been involved with me in both apostolates. One apostolate organized film festivals, the other ran adult education courses on the Catholic novel. The pandemic has temporarily suspended both apostolates, but hopefully at some point in the future they will be revived.

Over the many years of operation of film festivals, more than 300 films have been presented. All the movies were either classics or near-classics. A diet of such films must influence the consciousness and consciousness of a person. I can’t think of a great movie that didn’t make it to any of the festivals. Showing the films was a labor of love for me. I saw each film before showing it to an audience and made a few brief remarks after each film. Festivals have made a deep impression on me. I suspect they also did it on people who regularly attended.

In Catholic novels classes over a 30-year period, the students and I have read or re-read over 100 Catholic novels. Some of these novels were masterpieces; most were excellent; all were at least interesting.

I realize now that what I was trying to do for myself and for those who attended the festivals or read the novels was to create a Catholic culture that would coexist with other cultures. Both programs were attempts to keep our faith nurtured and challenged within a secular society. I hoped that both programs would provide symbols that would help participants see more deeply into their religious faith. The programs had to provide symbols other than the deeply secular symbols that surround us and some of the symbols that almost attack our religious faith.

These two programs could be carried out in the parishes. What it would take to organize a film festival would be someone who is interested in cinema and willing to do a bit of homework by thinking about the history of cinema. If the person running the festival was willing to read a book or two about film, that would help. To host a talk show, someone would have to be interested enough to choose a series of Catholic novels. If help was needed, I suspect a librarian would be more than willing. Most, if not all, of the novels are probably available in paperback and might even be available on Kindle.

More and more, I see the need in my life to create my own “culture” by choosing symbols that somehow support my Catholic faith. I suspect my experience is not unique. In the contemporary world, we are bombarded with images telling us explicitly or at least implicitly what it means to be a person and what our goals in life should be.

None of these messages can correspond to the Good News of Jesus Christ. I think each of us needs a culture to remind us of that.


Father Lauder is a professor of philosophy at St. John’s University, Jamaica. He presents two 15-minute lectures from his series of lectures on the Catholic novel, at 10:30 a.m. Monday to Friday on NET-TV.

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Who was John Calvin and what is Calvinism? https://helviti.com/who-was-john-calvin-and-what-is-calvinism/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 13:00:02 +0000 https://helviti.com/who-was-john-calvin-and-what-is-calvinism/ In 1536, 27-year-old John Calvin (better known as John Calvin) fled his native France, where he had been persecuted for his new Protestant faith, and wrote a groundbreaking theological treatise titled “Institutes of the Christian Religion “. A wanted man in Catholic France, Calvin took refuge in neighboring Switzerland and stopped at an inn in […]]]>

In 1536, 27-year-old John Calvin (better known as John Calvin) fled his native France, where he had been persecuted for his new Protestant faith, and wrote a groundbreaking theological treatise titled “Institutes of the Christian Religion “.

A wanted man in Catholic France, Calvin took refuge in neighboring Switzerland and stopped at an inn in Geneva where he only planned to spend one night. But when the head of the local church, William Farel, learned that the author of “Institutes” was there, he burst into the inn and told Calvin it was God’s will that he stay and preach. in Geneva.

When Calvin tried to explain that he was a scholar, not a preacher, Farel turned red in the face (not harsh for a redhead) and swore that God would curse Calvin’s so-called “studies” if he dared leave Geneva. A man of great faith, Calvin took this as a sign.

“I felt as if God in heaven had laid his mighty hand on me to stop me in my tracks”, Calvin later wrote, “and I was so terrified that I did not continue my journey.”

John Calvin spent the rest of his life in Geneva preaching a new strain of Protestantism known as Reformed theology. A contemporary of famous Reformation leader Martin Luther, Calvin was the father of Calvinism, a faith inextricably linked to the controversial doctrine of predestination, according to which a sovereign God has already chosen who will be saved and who will be damned.

To better understand the life and legacy of Calvin – one of Christianity’s most influential and controversial figures – we spoke with Bruce Gordon, professor of church history at Yale Divinity School and author of the biography “Calvin” and “John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion: A Biography.”

“God willing, it must be good”

In his early twenties, Calvin was studying law in France (his father’s idea) when he came across the preaching of Luther, who taught that God was found in the Bible, not in the saints and sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church. Much like his later experience in the Geneva Inn, Calvin was convinced that it was God’s will that he leave law school and follow in the footsteps of Luther and other early church reformers.

The will of God – or more accurately the “sovereignty” of God’s will – is a central tenet of Calvinism, the Protestant movement founded in Calvin’s name. For Calvin as well as for most early Reformers, the Bible made it clear that God was an all-powerful being who controlled everything, including the salvation of mankind.

In Romans 9:15, Paul quotes God saying to Moses, “I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have mercy on whom I have mercy.” In other words, God chooses to save whom he wants to save, and he has his own incomprehensible reasons for doing so; that is to say, he is sovereign. For Calvin, the important thing was not to understand the will of God, but to accept it.

“One of Calvin’s main themes was that we don’t know the mind of God,” says Gordon. “But if God wants it, it has to be good.”

If God alone is responsible, then there is nothing we sinful humans can do to “earn” our salvation. Yes, we can be “justified” by faith in Jesus Christ, as Luther taught, but even that faith in Christ is not the product of our will. It is a gift from God prepared since the dawn of time.

“Double Predestination”

Born nearly 30 years after Luther, Calvin was a “second generation” Protestant reformer, says Gordon, meaning he inherited much of his theology from those who came before him, including the influential Swiss theologian. Huldrych Zwingli, whose book Gordon has just published. about (“Zwingli: the prophet armed with God”).

One such widely accepted doctrine in the Reformation era was predestination.

“Calvin is famously associated with predestination, but what many people don’t know is that predestination was a core teaching of Christianity from early church fathers like St. Augustine,” Gordon says.

The accepted version of predestination was that God had “chosen” those who would be saved from before the creation of the world. But Calvin went one step further and took predestination to its next logical conclusion: if God alone decided who was saved and would dwell with him in heaven, then he also decided who was damned and would spend an eternity in hell. And here’s the kicker: there’s nothing we can do to change that.

In theological terms, Calvin’s belief in a sovereign God who both saves and damns according to his own will is called “double predestination”, and it was controversial from the start.

“The idea of ​​double predestination shocks a lot of people, because they start saying, Calvin created this God who is the source of evil,” Gordon says.

Keep in mind that Calvin was preaching in the 16th century, when the belief in a literal heaven and hell was universal. In this context, double predestination seems to raise a poignant question: if God has already decided who goes where, then how do I know if I am one of the lucky ones?

“Interestingly, Calvin was pretty optimistic about it,” Gordon says. “Calvin taught that if you are troubled by this question and try to find signs of your election, that in itself is a sign that you are numbered among the elect. fuck.”

Calvin came to believe that election could be “proven” by outward signs, including: the profession of faith, disciplined Christian behavior, and conscientious attendance at the Lord’s Supper (or Communion), the only sacrament inherited from Catholicism .

The Servetus Affair

Much like predestination, no discussion of John Calvin can omit an infamous incident that took place in 1553, when Calvin was the chief religious authority in Geneva, known as the “Servet Affair”.

Michael Servetus (Miguel Serveto) was a very literal Spanish “Renaissance man”. He was a self-taught scholar of the Bible, cartography, human physiology and more. Servetus got into hot water with Catholic authorities when he published tracts rejecting the Trinity, the doctrine that God the Father, God the Son (Jesus Christ), and God the Holy Spirit were three persons. distinct united in one Divinity. For his crime of heresy, Servetus was sentenced to death by the Catholic Church.

But Servetus escaped from prison and fled to Geneva, where he appeared publicly at one of Calvin’s sermons and was summarily arrested. Calvin and Servetus had a history. They had exchanged letters for years, each trying to convince the other of their theological follies, and Calvin had even visited Servetus in Paris – at great risk to his own safety – to urge the heretic Servetus to repent.

Ultimately, Servetus was executed in Geneva for his heretical teachings. Calvin’s defenders argue that he had no power to save or condemn Servetus, and that it was the state that killed him. Critics of Calvin insist that a man in Calvin’s religious authority in Geneva could have intervened to save Servet’s life. Instead, he burned at the stake.

Gordon says the Servetus affair made Calvin look like a hardliner and provided ammunition for critics and opponents of Calvin, many of whom he had in the 1550s.

“This story makes Calvin infamous among many people as that ‘lightning-throwing Zeus’ who created a punitive and judging God in his own image,” says Gordon. “Calvin becomes associated with this very severe notion of God.”

Calvinism and the Protestant work ethic

In Geneva, Calvin helped create a theocratic society in which the Bible was the primary guide to moral and civic order. Ordained pastors, elders, and deacons oversaw the spiritual and temporal welfare of the city, ministering to the poor and rebuking the wicked. Sunday church attendance was compulsory. Lectures, sermons, and church services were held every day of the week, with Calvin himself preaching and teaching publicly every day. He maintained this tireless pace until his death in 1564.

In the following century, Calvinism arrived in England, where it was adopted by the Puritan movement. Not all Puritans who came to America were Calvinists, but sociologist Max Weber credits Calvinist theology with fueling the rise of capitalism in the colonies.

The Puritans, unlike Calvin himself, were consumed with anguish by the question of their predestined status: were they among the chosen or the damned? Puritans came to believe that an outward sign of election was economic prosperity. This Puritan doctrine fostered the development of what Weber called the “Protestant work ethic”, in which individuals accomplish God’s will through worldly vocations.

In the 18th century, Gordon says, Calvinism went into decline as Enlightenment ideals of personal freedom crumbled against the rigidity of predestination. In its place came a more liberal streak of Protestantism, which moved away from strict predestination to embrace the more inclusive concept of “universality”, in which all mankind can be saved through faith in Jesus. -Christ.

But that doesn’t mean Calvinism is dead. Far from there. Calvinism made a comeback in the resurgence of Reformed theology and the popularity of Reformed churches and pastors like John Piper and Timothy Keller. As chronicled in the book “Young, Restless, Reformed: A Journalist’s Journey with the New Calvinists”, Calvin’s uncompromising teachings, including predestination, have made their way to a new generation of young evangelical Christians.

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Readers write: Holidays, religion in schools, “It’s a wonderful life” https://helviti.com/readers-write-holidays-religion-in-schools-its-a-wonderful-life/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 00:00:54 +0000 https://helviti.com/readers-write-holidays-religion-in-schools-its-a-wonderful-life/ The beauty and depth of thoughtfulness of David Brooks, “A Message to Those Who Are Deeply Desperate” (Opinion Exchange, December 11), made me cry. As a retired healthcare chaplain (who is still fully engaged in life), I thought of the countless patients who, upon leaving their rooms, commented, “Chaplain, thank you for listening to me. […]]]>


The beauty and depth of thoughtfulness of David Brooks, “A Message to Those Who Are Deeply Desperate” (Opinion Exchange, December 11), made me cry. As a retired healthcare chaplain (who is still fully engaged in life), I thought of the countless patients who, upon leaving their rooms, commented, “Chaplain, thank you for listening to me.

In this hectic and troubled holiday season, I invite all of us to put down our electronics and really listen – listen to others, to the nature and calm of our hearts that beckons us to hope, kindness and compassion. .

Jerry C. Vandrovec, Plymouth

•••

Today I have decided to speak as a therapist as well as a grieving person. I hear so many sad stories during the holidays. Many of them are sadder because of unfulfilled expectations, photos of happy families on social media, Christmas cards showing everyone posing together, the assumption that we’re happy – and together. I ask that we consider how many vacations have been perfect or even close. How many were OK, average, or just not that good? And how many were “I couldn’t wait to go” bad?

Holidays are an event where the sense of perspective is seldom used, adding to the intensity of feelings producing good and bad results. All the planning and preparation makes the event potentially more stressful – if you’ve done all that work to make it special, it better be good!

We should, I suppose, expect everyone to behave well; kind, caring, cheerful. Although we haven’t seen each other since the last vacation when Cousin George had a fight with Cousin Susan over politics, and they both sulked the rest of the time. In fact, consider how putting a group of people who only see each other a few times a year in a house for, say, eight hours could go wrong.

Here is my therapeutic solution: Lower your expectations. And find something you can do to feel good about yourself. Like talking to cousin George, who is a funny guy who you never talk to. Think maybe of a holiday regret from last year. This year you will give your mom a hug. Or say a toast to your mom in heaven. Or to all those who are gone.

Yes, there is a place for loss during the holidays. I believe when it’s not said it’s worse – lonely, isolating and ashamed. And my last thought, times being what they are, is to close the vacation door knowing that you, personally, did your best: you told people you love them. At least let the holidays be a chance to love and feel loved.

Margot Storti-Marron, Sugar bush

•••

As a longtime resident of Loring Park, it was great Saturday night to see the Holidazzle lights, people lining up for the merry-go-round and sliding down the high slide, and the kids posing with Santa Claus. Best of all was the magnificent fireworks display that lit up the park and the pond. The food and gift vendors were top notch. Lights on trees and buildings made families feel safe, as did the park police.

The Downtown Council has shown the neighborhood that it values ​​our downtown park. The board, its funders and staff deserve a lot of thanks for reminding everyone of how much of a gem Loring Park is.

Pat Davies, Minneapolis

RELIGION IN SCHOOLS

I strongly support Tom Duke’s comments on the Minnesota Social Studies Standards Revision Project on Religious Education (“Religious Education is Better in New Standards,” Opinion Exchange, December 20) . In particular, I agree that instruction must include not only the history, but also the understanding of “how individuals interact with religious identity here and now”. Part of the opposition to religion in the school curriculum stems from parents’ fear that education will be used in defense of religion. Every effort should be made to ensure that the training will be completely neutral.

In his discussion of “religious identity in the here and now,” Duke overlooks the dramatic rise of the non-religious. According to a report released this month by the Pew Research Center, 29% of Americans now describe their religious identity as “atheist, agnostic, or” nothing in particular. ” 10 points more than ten years ago.

The teaching of the religious identity of Americans cannot ignore this trend. It should cover the causes, including the intellectual rationale for rejecting belief in the supernatural, ethics based on humanistic values, and support for secular government, which ensures that private religious beliefs are protected from government influence.

Advocating for inclusive norms for religion in social science education, Duke points out that one in four students are bullied, some because of their religion. I would like to remind everyone that atheist children are also bullied.

George Francis Kane, Saint-Paul

•••

I grew up in a strong Catholic family 70 years ago, and we were taught that we are part of the one true religion, to the point of not even attending a wedding in a non-Catholic church. Times have certainly changed with the ecumenical movement and religious freedoms in America offering everyone the opportunity to learn about all the options being practiced. I had a fascinating year in weekly faith training classes that studied the history to the present day of all religions in the world, and this was perhaps the best educational opportunity since my college days. .

I was delighted to read Duke’s comment. After decades of ignorance of religion due to the separation of church and state, educators plan to add a broad religious curriculum to social studies in our public schools in Minnesota. Real progress on accepting diversity can be made much better with a comprehensive understanding of all different religions, races and cultures and how they affect each person around us. We can finally understand that we are not that different and face similar challenges in finding our way through this life embracing a faith in the hope of more.

Michael Tillemans, Minneapolis

‘IT’S A MAGNIFICENT LIFE’

I enjoyed Chris Hewitt’s December 20 post on the holiday classic “It’s a Wonderful Life,” but as a copyright professor, I have a small gripe (“It’s a “wonderful” birthday ”). The article is correct that Republic Pictures’ non-renewal of copyright (a formality that US law eventually abandoned) meant that the film appeared to fall into the public domain in 1974. This in turn allowed to TV channels to stream it for free, and over time. helped develop the grateful audience the film lacked when it debuted in 1946.

However, a 1990 Supreme Court ruling – regarding another Jimmy Stewart film, “Rear Window” – prompted Republic, who still owned the copyright to the short story “It’s a Wonderful Life” was based on, to assert that any unauthorized distribution of the film would infringe the rights of the story. Republic made a deal with NBC, and as a result, the film doesn’t air as often as it did in the 1970s. (For a more in-depth discussion, see the article by Samantha Kosarzycki to which Hewitt’s article refers.) In contrast, the bad-it’s-good “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians” lost its copyright when it debuted in 1964, for failing to comply with another formality that the United States has taken. later dropped, and as far as I know it still remains in the public domain.

Thomas Cotter, Hopkins

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UMass Dartmouth welcomes Dr Eric Morier-Genaud from Belfast as Chair of Portuguese Studies https://helviti.com/umass-dartmouth-welcomes-dr-eric-morier-genaud-from-belfast-as-chair-of-portuguese-studies/ https://helviti.com/umass-dartmouth-welcomes-dr-eric-morier-genaud-from-belfast-as-chair-of-portuguese-studies/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 17:10:09 +0000 https://helviti.com/umass-dartmouth-welcomes-dr-eric-morier-genaud-from-belfast-as-chair-of-portuguese-studies/ DARTMOUTH – Eric Morier-Genaud, visiting professor of Portuguese studies at UMass Dartmouth, who normally teaches at Queen’s University Belfast, said he sometimes felt “a bit isolated” academically in Ireland from North. “Being in Belfast, as you can imagine, Portuguese is not a priority,” Prof Morier-Genaud said at a reception on October 28 at UMass Dartmouth […]]]>


DARTMOUTH – Eric Morier-Genaud, visiting professor of Portuguese studies at UMass Dartmouth, who normally teaches at Queen’s University Belfast, said he sometimes felt “a bit isolated” academically in Ireland from North.

“Being in Belfast, as you can imagine, Portuguese is not a priority,” Prof Morier-Genaud said at a reception on October 28 at UMass Dartmouth Library to welcome him on campus and present it to the community as Helio. and the Amélia Pedroso / Luso American Development Foundation Chair in Portuguese Studies.

Dr Morier-Genaud, who has immersed himself in research on religion and politics, war and conflict resolution in the Portuguese-speaking world and southern Africa, will spend the fall semester at UMass Dartmouth teaching a postgraduate seminar entitled “Armed conflicts and movements in Portuguese – Talking about Africa.

He said one of his goals was to engage his students in collective discussions about the impact of social movements within the Portuguese military in Angola, Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau before the Carnation Revolution in the United States. Portugal April 25, 1974.

He also plans to host an off-campus conference, offer a lunchtime lecture series and collaborate with Tagus Press, the editorial arm of the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture at UMass Dartmouth.

UMass Dartmouth The Chancellor of UMass Dartmouth delivers welcoming remarks at a reception held on October 28 to welcome Dr Eric Morier-Genaud as the Helio Chair and Amélia Pedroso / Luso American Development Foundation in Portuguese studies.

“I thought it would be great, and it turned out to be a great pleasure, to be able to teach a subject close to my heart. It is something that I lived, something in which I invested a lot ”, he declared, while evoking the reason which pushed him to apply for this post of endowed president.

“I applied because the Center for Portuguese Studies is very well known internationally,” he added. “It is really the main center outside the Portuguese-speaking world. I don’t think there is an equivalence.

While most Portuguese centers are deeply concentrated in linguistics or literature, that of UMass Dartmouth is attached to the Portuguese-American Archives, a publishing house, collaborates with multidisciplinary departments and is linked to the local Portuguese community.

“It’s pretty unique,” ​​he said.

From left to right, Dr Bridget Teboh, Associate Professor of African History at UMass Dartmouth;  Dr Eric Morier-Genaud, holder of the Hélio and Amélia Pedroso / Luso American Development Foundation Chair in Portuguese studies;  and Dr Paula Noversa, director of the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture.

Dr Genaud graduated from the State University of New York at Binghamton (United States), where he obtained his doctorate on the politics of the Roman Catholic Church in colonial Mozambique. He joined Queen’s University in September 2008, having spent the previous six years as a researcher and lecturer at the universities of Oxford, Lausanne and Basel (Switzerland).

He said he looks forward to leaving a positive mark on the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture.

“What a pleasure for me to contribute to a project which, in my opinion, has a great future and which deserves to be supported”, declared Dr Morier-Genaud. “I hope I can help and make my contribution, no matter how small or small, but I will try to do my best.”

Dr Mark Fuller, Chancellor of UMass Dartmouth, noted that this endowed chair was established in 2005 by benefactors Luis Pedroso, Maria Dulce Alves Furman, Anthony Andrade, Frank B. Sousa Jr. and Manuel Neto.

“It is a unique gift that has enabled us to welcome to our campus more than 15 distinguished academics in Portuguese studies,” he said. “Their work celebrated Portuguese-speaking cultures around the world. They have taught postgraduate courses, shared their knowledge with the community through public lectures, organized a series of seminars that have benefited our students, staff and the Southcoast community. We are very grateful to be able to enrich the learning, understanding and celebration of Portuguese culture by our students through this endowed chair.

Dr Fuller went on to say that the Portuguese-American community is a “vital part of the fabric of the South Coast” and that the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture is “an integral part” of the UMass curriculum. Dartmouth.

“I would like to thank Dr. [Paula] Noversa (the director of the Center) and her colleagues for all the wonderful work that the center is doing ”, declared the Chancellor. “Thank you all for joining us this evening in welcoming Dr. Eric Morier-Genaud to UMass Dartmouth.”


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A gay music teacher got married. The Brooklyn Diocese fired him. https://helviti.com/a-gay-music-teacher-got-married-the-brooklyn-diocese-fired-him/ https://helviti.com/a-gay-music-teacher-got-married-the-brooklyn-diocese-fired-him/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 19:16:56 +0000 https://helviti.com/a-gay-music-teacher-got-married-the-brooklyn-diocese-fired-him/ Matthew LaBanca said he held two titles while working for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn: music teacher and parish music director. On and off for 16 years he played the organ and conducted the choir at Corpus Christi Church in Queens. In 2015 he also started working at St. Joseph Catholic Academy, also in […]]]>


Matthew LaBanca said he held two titles while working for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn: music teacher and parish music director.

On and off for 16 years he played the organ and conducted the choir at Corpus Christi Church in Queens. In 2015 he also started working at St. Joseph Catholic Academy, also in Queens, where he taught children to sing and play instruments like the recorder and drums.

But, after Mr LaBanca married her boyfriend in August, he learned that a group of church leaders were debating his future and wondering if he had another job with the Catholic Church as well – that of “minister” – although he has no formal religion. training and his jobs did not involve religious education or preaching.

On October 13, the Diocese of Brooklyn, which encompasses the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, fired Mr. LaBanca because the church does not tolerate same-sex marriage.

It is illegal for employers to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation under federal, state, and New York City laws, but religious institutions are allowed to favor members of their faith in employment settings. like schools and places of worship.

This loophole does not allow them to discriminate on the basis of traits such as gender or sexual orientation, unless the job in question is a ministerial post. This provides the legal basis by which the Catholic Church can refuse to employ women as priests, but in recent years it has increasingly been used to fire same-sex married persons from jobs that were not not traditionally considered to be part of the clergy.

In a statement regarding the ruling, the diocese referred to Mr. LaBanca as a “music teacher and pastor” and explicitly said he was fired because his marriage violates the requirement that pastors abide by the teachings of the ‘church.

“Despite changes to New York state law in 2011 legalizing same-sex marriage, Church law is clear,” the diocese said in a statement. He added: “In his case, it has been determined that he can no longer fulfill his obligations as a minister of the faith in the school or in the parish.”

When he was laid off, Mr. LaBanca was offered severance pay of $ 20,000 if he signed a confidentiality agreement that would prevent him from discussing his layoff, he said. He refused.

Instead, Mr LaBanca, 46, went public with his dismissal to draw attention to the church’s use of the legal loophole to target LGBT people while other employees whose lives don’t match. not to the teachings of the church go unpunished.

“There are a lot of people whose lives don’t conform to the teachings of the church,” he said. “People who don’t go to church on Sundays. People who are on birth control. People who divorce and remarry.

He married his longtime partner Rowan Meyer, an actor, on August 1 in a ceremony officiated by his father, who was ordained online by the Universal Life Church. Mr. LaBanca said it was “the happiest day of my life”.

He described himself as a longtime Catholic whose faith had been deeply shaken by the events of the past few weeks. He said he couldn’t stop thinking about Pope Francis’ pastoral approach to LGBT people.

“The idea that we should stand up for the Catholic faith – well, there’s a lot of ambiguity right now about what that means based on what the Pope himself has said about acceptance.” , did he declare.

The rationale for firing Mr LaBanca and other Catholic teachers like him is still the subject of legal debate, experts said.

“There’s absolutely no government rule about who can be considered a minister, so it’s a really, really broad exemption,” said Sharita Gruberg, vice president of LGBTQ research at the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank. “The courts are going to have to keep answering, is this individual a minister or not?”

The Supreme Court ruled last year that federal employment discrimination laws do not apply to teachers in religious schools if their duties include religious activities, such as praying with students. But he also found in a separate case that LGBT people were covered by federal civil rights law which prohibited discrimination in the workplace on the basis of sex.

“The Supreme Court has taken a very broad view of the ministerial exception,” said Katherine M. Franke, director of the Law, Rights and Religion project at Columbia Law School. “The borderline question is when does an employee actually engage in ministry, as opposed to a private religious school where someone teaches math, science, or literature?

“This is the question, what does it mean to be engaged in ministry? She added. “It cannot just be that you are employed by a religious institution. “

In its statement on Mr. LaBanca’s dismissal, the diocese provided an excerpt from its employment contract for teachers, which reads: “The teacher is essential to the ministry of transmitting the faith and recognizes that he is a minister. of the Roman Catholic faith. . “

Mr LaBanca said the church’s description of his role was “extremely subjective” and not “minister with a capital M”, and that he did not sign any such contracts for his work at the parish.

“I would say it’s a strong label for what I do,” he said. “I would never have called myself a minister. And at school, I was Mr. Matt, or Mr. Matthew, I was never called a minister.

His work with the Diocese began in 2005 as the kind of side gig to pay the bills that many actors in New York City get. He quickly became a passion and his main source of income and health insurance.

He worked as a Music Director at Corpus Christi in Woodside from 2005 to 2007, then left to perform in theatrical shows, including the Broadway production of “Young Frankenstein,” before returning to work in 2012. Three years later he began his work at St. Joseph’s Catholic Academy in Astoria.

Mr LaBanca said he did not keep his sexual orientation a secret at work, although he “did not care much about my marriage” because he was aware of the teaching of the church on homosexuality.

“It’s not like I’m locked up,” he said. “I respect the fact that some people in the community may not understand or be able to see beyond what their catechism, culture or parish mentality may have informed them on this issue. I was respectful in this regard, but people knew I was gay.


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New York University professor emeritus of philosophy of education Dr. Gabriel Moran dies at 86 https://helviti.com/new-york-university-professor-emeritus-of-philosophy-of-education-dr-gabriel-moran-dies-at-86/ https://helviti.com/new-york-university-professor-emeritus-of-philosophy-of-education-dr-gabriel-moran-dies-at-86/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 01:31:48 +0000 https://helviti.com/new-york-university-professor-emeritus-of-philosophy-of-education-dr-gabriel-moran-dies-at-86/ Tuesday, October 19, 2021 Avery-Storti Funeral Home and Crematorium Enlarge + Internationally renowned scholar and much admired teacher Dr. Gabriel Moran, AFSC, passed away on October 15, 2021 in New York City. His writings made important contributions to Roman Catholic theology and ecumenical religious education. At the time of his death, Moran was Professor Emeritus […]]]>


Tuesday, October 19, 2021

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Internationally renowned scholar and much admired teacher Dr. Gabriel Moran, AFSC, passed away on October 15, 2021 in New York City. His writings made important contributions to Roman Catholic theology and ecumenical religious education. At the time of his death, Moran was Professor Emeritus of Philosophy of Education at New York University, where he had taught for 29 years.

Moran was predeceased by his beloved wife, Maria Harris, his sisters Louise Lyons and Dorothy Perkins, his brother John, and his parents, Mary Murphy and John Moran. He is survived by his sister Mary, member of the Sisters of Mercy, several nieces and nephews, and many friends.

Born Richard Moran on August 11, 1935, in Manchester, New Hampshire, he joined De La Salle Christian Brothers in 1954, accepting the name Gabriel. He received his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees from the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC.

In 1965, Moran became director of the Manhattan College Graduate Program of Theology and Religious Education. His in-depth knowledge of Roman Catholic tradition and ancient and modern philosophy, coupled with his clarity of expression, has drawn students from across the United States and abroad. In 1970 he was elected Provincial Superior of the Long Island and New England District of the Christian Brothers.

In 1978, Moran joined the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at New York University where he taught religion, philosophy, and the history of education. In 1985, Moran retired from the Christian Brothers and married his colleague, Maria Harris, in 1986. They remained married until his death in 2005. He was welcomed back into the Christian Brothers with the honor of Affiliate Member in 2020.

His tenure at New York University strengthened Moran’s ecumenical position, attracting students from many religious traditions, as well as those who were not formally members of any religious tradition. As chair of the Department of Religious Studies, Moran has mentored doctoral students writing from Buddhist, Evangelical Protestant, and Roman Catholic perspectives. With several members of an educational team, Alternative Religious Education, he initiated and published The Alternative newsletter for 45 years. Moran was among the first members of the International Seminars on Education and Religious Values ​​(ISREV). Its international presence has flourished with conferences in Asia, Africa, Europe and Australia.

Moran and his colleague and wife Maria Harris received the William Rainey Harper Award at the Religious Education Association Centennial Celebration. Fordham University’s Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education awarded Moran and Harris the Sapientia and Doctrina (Wisdom and Learning) distinction, noting that together they had changed the field of religious education, to both Catholic and ecumenical, all over the world. In 2004, Moran received the National Conference Award for Catechetical Leadership.

Through more than 400 essays and 31 books, Moran has created a distinguished and far-reaching body of work. Although critical at times, his most recent book, What Happened to the Roman Catholic Church? And now? An Institutional and Personal Memoir offers hopeful guidance for a Church response to key issues such as sexual diversity, non-violent strength, racial equality, the priesthood, and women’s rights. Its theme echoes its underlying thesis that Catholic revelation is present both in the teachings of Christian mystics and in the community participation of women and men in Catholic liturgies today.

A full list of Moran’s published works and a more complete biography appear on the website.

Moran will be awakened at Gannon Funeral Home, 152 East 28 Street, New York City, on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.

On Thursday October 21 and Friday October 22, a tour will be held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Christian Brothers Center, 635 Ocean Rd., Narragansett, Rhode Island.

Arrangements by Avery-Storti Funeral Home and Crematorium, 88 Columbia Street, Wakefield, RI.

A Christian burial liturgy will be celebrated at Notre-Dame de l’Étoile Chapel, Christian Brothers Center, at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, October 23, 2021.

Interment will be in the cemetery of the brothers.

Donations in memory of Moran may be made payable to the Christian Brothers and sent to the Development Office, Christian Brothers, PO Box 238, Lincroft, New Jersey 07738-0238.



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