Religion studies – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 01:06:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Religion studies – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 I may be biased: I support the GSA https://helviti.com/i-may-be-biased-i-support-the-gsa/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 23:00:02 +0000 https://helviti.com/i-may-be-biased-i-support-the-gsa/ At the Washakie County School District School Board No.1 meeting on October 25, a number of students and community members approached the board with a simple request: to start a Gay-Straight Alliance club, also known as GSA. The board of directors unanimously approved the club. Personally, I was delighted for these children and their club. […]]]>

At the Washakie County School District School Board No.1 meeting on October 25, a number of students and community members approached the board with a simple request: to start a Gay-Straight Alliance club, also known as GSA. The board of directors unanimously approved the club.

Personally, I was delighted for these children and their club. Growing up in the LGBT community, I didn’t have that kind of support. I didn’t know there was someone else going through who I was until I met my friends, and even then it was sometimes difficult.

When I walked out of the school council meeting, the first thing I did was text a few of my friends about the club and its endorsement. They were all as surprised as I was that this was presented to the board, let alone approved. They all made a similar statement saying they were proud of the kids who created the club.

Of course, we had the right to be surprised. When it comes to living in the “Equal State,” this only applies if you are seen as equal to everyone else in the State. Being part of the LGBT community seems to automatically eliminate your chances of this happening. When it comes to homophobia and transphobia, there are worse places to live. I know some countries will kill you for being gay, so we take it a step further. What I’m trying to say is Wyoming isn’t known for being open-minded.

With that in mind, the inevitable has happened. People are really upset that this club has been approved. I’m here to do my best to explain why this club is a good thing and move in the right direction for this city by dividing it into two, one to talk about GSA and one to discuss identity ideology gender.

For starters, according to an article on childtrends.org by Dominique Parris and Brandon Stratford, in a recent review of LGBT-focused school policies and practices, researchers noted that, of all the interventions reviewed, GSAs are supported by the evidence. most consistent to show that they improve the climate and educational outcomes of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer / questioning youth.

To be specific, the researchers identified several studies that documented a reduction in homophobic victimization of LGBTQ students in schools with GSA. LGBTQ youth who participate in GSAs report that clubs are a source of community, a gateway to LGBTQ-friendly resources, and a marker of safety.

According to the article, evidence also suggests that the presence of GSA is associated with benefits for all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity, including youth who do not identify as LGBTQ. For example, one study found a reduction in substance abuse, suicide attempts, and risky sexual behavior among youth in schools with GSA – the strongest effects appear to be among LGBTQ students.

GSAs have been proven time and again to improve the academic and personal lives of LGBTQ students. It just takes knowing that students are not alone to make a huge difference in their lives.

Contemporary LGBTQ adolescents are known to be disproportionately exposed to psychosocial well-being and health issues, according to a study published on the National Institute of Health’s website at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. A growing body of evidence shows disproportionate risk among transgender youth. Specifically, previous research indicates that young people from sexual minorities are at greater risk than heterosexuals for thoughts and attempts of suicide, depression, substance abuse and low self-esteem. Recent studies using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health document that the disparate risks reported by this population of suicidality and depression are particularly increased during the developmental period of adolescence and dissipate in adulthood for men. attracted to the same sex. These findings are of particular importance because they clarify for researchers, policy makers and those working with young people that a primary opportunity to potentially reduce risk to LGBT people is during adolescence.

Much of the time of adolescents is spent in school. Therefore, schools are a potential framework for the positive development and resilience of young people. LGBT teens report high rates of verbal and physical victimization in school and report that their school environment is unsafe. These negative school experiences have been linked to long-term negative mental health and health outcomes. And, before I comment on “mental illness is in your head”, yes; it is literally.

The disparity in positive school experiences for LGBTQ youth lacks information about the positive development of LGBTQ adolescents in positive school settings, such as extracurricular activities. In fact, just like their heterosexual peers, these school-based activities can be a primary framework that promotes positive youth development.

Research suggests that the presence of a GSA may serve as a protective factor for LGBTQ teens, so LGBTQ teens who report their school has a GSA tend to report more school safety and a greater well-being.

The presence of a GSA was further found to be associated with higher levels of school safety, fewer reports of being absent from school due to fear, and greater awareness of a safe adult in the school context. Finally, a few studies have documented that the presence of GSA is associated with a reduced risk of suicide in sexual minority youth.

Now let’s talk about the fears that some people are expressing about this club.

The main thing I want to discuss is that GSAs promote the ideology of gender identity. It seems people are worried that this is a bad thing, for reasons that I can’t fathom. Full Disclosure, as many readers know I am a transgender male. So I don’t see anything wrong with people exploring their gender identity. Gender is not black and white. Well, blue and pink. It’s a huge spectrum and everyone is in a different place.

With religion in mind, many people have the same argument. That you should not interfere with God’s purpose. To this I would like to call attention to Botox, diet pills, facelifts, braces, nuclear warfare, deforestation, laser hair removal, hydrogenated oils, hair dye, Viagra and literally thousands of other everyday things.

Now, on the science side, I’m going to start off by saying that in my experience no one pretends to be transgender. Anyone who decides “Hey, I want to be called insults and wear clothes that don’t fit well to make me stand out!” Is absolutely ridiculous.

Some transgender people suffer from what is called “gender dysphoria”.

According to psychiatry.org, gender dysphoria is clinically significant distress or impairment related to a strong desire to be another gender, which may include the desire to change primary and / or secondary sex characteristics. Being transgender is not something that is taught in schools, nor can it be taught, and it is not something that can be influenced on you. You cannot inflict gender dysphoria or the need to change gender on someone who is not already transgender, or question their gender.

In addition, the Worland High School GSA Club is by no means compulsory. Your children do not have to attend this club. It is not because this club takes place in your school that it changes the program. Just because this club was added doesn’t mean they’re suddenly teaching your kids to be gay. You can’t even teach people to be gay. Being gay is something you were born to, not something that develops or something that is taught.

Now I know I mentioned that I’m keeping religion to a minimum, but I think I’ve been in church enough to qualify to talk about it.

In an article written by Rev. Elder Don Eastman on Religiousinstitute.org, “Christians today do not follow the rules and rituals described in Leviticus. But some ignore his definitions of “uncleanness” while citing Leviticus to condemn “homosexuals.”

“Such an abuse of the scriptures distorts the meaning of the Old Testament and negates a message of the New Testament. ‘You shall not sleep with a male as one sleeps with a female: it is an abomination.’ These words appear only in the Leviticus Code of Holiness, a ritual manual for priests in Israel. Their significance can only be fully appreciated in the historical and cultural context of the ancient Hebrew people. Israel, in one place as a chosen people of one God, was to avoid the practices of other peoples and gods.

Reverend Eastman states that “the rituals and rules found in the Old Testament were given to preserve the distinctive features of the religion and culture of Israel. But, as stated in Galatians 3: 22-25, Christians are no longer bound by these Jewish laws. By faith they live in Jesus Christ, not in Leviticus. Of course, ethical concerns apply to all cultures and all ages. These concerns were ultimately reflected by Jesus Christ, who said nothing about homosexuality, but a lot about love, justice, mercy, and faith.

These children did nothing wrong. All they want is a safe space where they can be themselves and relate to the others around them. There is absolutely nothing wrong with it. Despite your opinions and concerns, this club was approved unanimously.

This takes Worland away from its traditional state of being and on a path in the right direction. I don’t know about you, but I’m delighted to see what this small step can do for our city.

Stay nice.


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What is global citizenship? Pepperdine graphic https://helviti.com/what-is-global-citizenship-pepperdine-graphic/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 07:35:03 +0000 https://helviti.com/what-is-global-citizenship-pepperdine-graphic/ Passports full of stamps were open. Like a passport, the path to global citizenship is like collecting stamps – bringing together diverse perspectives in pursuit of a holistic view of the world. The globe has 195 countries, 19,495 cities and 7.753 billion inhabitants. With such a large world population, global citizenship can be a difficult […]]]>

Passports full of stamps were open. Like a passport, the path to global citizenship is like collecting stamps – bringing together diverse perspectives in pursuit of a holistic view of the world.

The globe has 195 countries, 19,495 cities and 7.753 billion inhabitants.

With such a large world population, global citizenship can be a difficult concept to understand.

However, those who take responsibility for global citizenship understand the importance of stepping out of their comfort zone and getting to know other cultures and nationalities. For them, the goal is to broaden their horizons and gain empathy for others.

“To be a global citizen you need to be able to both appreciate diversity, be curious about it, and then be willing to use that appreciation to work together towards common goals that we share as a than humans on a shared planet, ”said Brian Swarts, program director for Pepperdine in Washington, DC.

Defining global citizenship

Blake Farley, Pepperdine Global Fellow and senior Religion major, said he believes global citizenship means being part of a larger and more diverse culture than the one he lives in. Farley practices global citizenship by traveling to other countries and serving people from other cultures.

“Being a citizen of the world means I belong to a community with more people than I know,” said Farley. “And more people than I know, and people who see the world very differently from me. I think that [it’s] an exciting opportunity to be a citizen of the world.

Members of the Pepperdine community have characterized global citizenship as the ability to interact with diverse cultures and stay aware of current events in the world.

Swarts said global citizenship is the idea that everyone has a role in the country they live in, and that everyone has a responsibility to contribute to their community and to communities with which they typically do not interact.

“Global citizenship, in my mind, is about people who are committed to intercultural engagement and understanding,” Swarts said. “It is a commitment to shared goals and the common good. “

It’s easy for people to adjust to what they know and forget that there are people who live differently from them, Swarts said. For him, part of global citizenship is engaging with different cultures instead of being in a circle of people.

“From the perspective of white Americans, or any dominant group, when you’re not engaged with people other than yourself, they hardly exist in your world,” Swarts said.

Izzy Lindstrom, a second year international studies major, agreed and said global citizenship means embracing the authenticity and appreciation of other nationalities to avoid ethnocentrism – the concept of putting one’s own culture above cultures of others. Lindstrom practices good global citizenship by getting to know people from other cultures and learning their beliefs and opinions without judgment.

“It’s just having respect for other cultures and understanding that what is normal for us may not be normal for another culture,” Lindstrom said.

The head, the heart and the hand

International Programs Dean Beth Laux said that being a good citizen of the world has three parts: the head, the heart and the hand.

The Global Citizenship Officer is familiar with different cultural traditions and history, as well as global trends. The second is the heart, which has a global view of the world and is open-minded to discover new cultures and new perspectives. The third is the hand – the behavioral aspect of global citizenship. Laux said the hand enables people to acquire holistic skills across cultures and to learn adaptability, situational awareness and problem-solving skills.

“Just engage with people who are very different [from] oneself is a way to start developing those skills and abilities, ”Laux said.

Swarts said being a responsible global citizen starts with knowing themselves and understanding their own culture and identity, so they can share this with others and get to know them better.

“Each of us has a story and a role to play within global citizenship,” Swarts said. “What it looks like and understanding what it is is unique to each of us.”

Engaging with other people who have different beliefs is also a critical aspect of being a good citizen, Swarts said.

“It can be as extreme as someone who comes from a completely different religion, or another part of the world like say, a refugee or an immigrant, someone who is like an international student,” Swarts said. . “To something as simple as someone from another part of the country.”

Global Citizenship in Practice: The Global Fellows Program

Farley studied abroad in Lausanne, Switzerland, and Washington, DC, with the Global Fellows Program, whose mission is to equip and empower a community of global leaders determined to be agents of change through integrated professional development, intercultural learning and academic excellence.

All students participating in the Global Fellows program must spend one year abroad and one semester in Washington, DC. They must also register for 22-23 course units focusing on Global Citizenship and Foreign Languages.

“[The] The Global Fellows program itself is for students who are serious about taking their overseas experience one step further and learning what it means to be a global citizen, ”said Farley.

Global Fellows trains individuals for global citizenship and how to be responsible citizens living in America, said Farley.

“I’ve definitely learned to view things more critically like the news,” Farley said. “And the way some organizations go out and look for ways to help with certain global issues or just certain communities.”

Laux currently oversees the Global Fellows program and said it was a great way for members of the Pepperdine community to learn valuable global citizenship skills.

“It helps them [Global Fellows] create, lead and communicate effectively across cultures, which is essential to be agents of change in today’s society, ”said Laux. “It’s just an opportunity to collaborate and build a future we can all work towards with other communities. “

Practice global citizenship at the national level

While individuals can learn to be global citizens through broader experiences like traveling and studying abroad, there are also ways for people to broaden their horizons and be good global citizens since their home.

Farley recommended that people talk with as many people as possible, stay on top of current global issues, and look for ways to serve in their communities.

Lindstrom also said that the best way to be a good citizen of the world is to stay informed about what is going on in the world and to do as much research as possible on different nationalities and cultures.

“If you want to appreciate a culture and respect it, you have to know what’s going on,” Lindstrom said.

Another essential step in being a good citizen of the world is to shift focus from oneself and one’s own country to other people and their countries, Swarts said.

“Listen to what people are saying, not just about us, but about themselves,” Swarts said. “Let others define themselves rather than straying from definitions we maybe got in school or definitions we got from popular culture. “

Additionally, Lindstrom said it’s important to recognize that while being a global citizen can push individuals out of their comfort zone, it also broadens people’s horizons and educates individuals on how live people of various cultures.

“We have a responsibility to understand the impact of our actions and our choices,” said Laux. “And to make sure we think about all the different variables that impact communities around the world. “

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Email to Abby Wilt: abby.wilt@pepperdine.edu.

Follow Currents Magazine on Twitter: @PeppCurrents and Instagram: @currentsmagazine



Key words:
Abby Wilt Beth Laux Brian Swarts Currents Fall 2021 Currents Magazine Global Citizenship Global Fellows Program international programs pepperdine media graphics




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“The Word of the Lord as a metonymy of Christ” https://helviti.com/the-word-of-the-lord-as-a-metonymy-of-christ/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 22:16:51 +0000 https://helviti.com/the-word-of-the-lord-as-a-metonymy-of-christ/ Joseph Smith’s First VisionA 1913 stained glass window by an unknown artist(Image in the Wikimedia Commons public domain) *** A new article – this one by Loren Blake Spendlove – went up two or three hours ago in Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saints Faith and Scholarship: “The Word of the Lord as a metonymy […]]]>

Joseph Smith’s First Vision
A 1913 stained glass window by an unknown artist
(Image in the Wikimedia Commons public domain)

***

A new article – this one by Loren Blake Spendlove – went up two or three hours ago in Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saints Faith and Scholarship:

“The Word of the Lord as a metonymy of Christ”

Abstract: The word of the Lord and the word of God are common expressions in the Bible. Frequently, these expressions refer to the covenant words written or spoken of God to His people as given by the prophets. However, exegetical study of these expressions has revealed that they also serve as metonymies, or substitutions for the name of God himself. In this article, I explore these metonymic uses of the Word of the Lord and the Word of God as substitutes for Christ in the Bible and in the Book of Mormon.

***

Which reminds me: Some other the articles have already been published in Interpreter. Here are the links to five of them:

Loren Blake Spendlove, “Be a Disciple as the World Collapses Around You”

Adam S. Miller Reviews, Mormon: A Brief Theological Introduction (Provo, UT: The Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, 2020). 162 pages. $ 9.95 (paperback).

Abstract: Adam Miller created a thoughtful and illuminating theological study of the Book of Mormon. It is clear from his textual commentary that Miller has devoted a great deal of thought and effort to extracting practical ideas from the original authors of the book. With the exception of a few awkward distractions that appear occasionally in his text, I would highly recommend Miller’s analysis of the doomsday accounts of Mormon and Moroni.

S. Kent Brown, “Jesus’ First Visit to the Temple”

Abstract: In this rich and detailed description, Sr. Kent Brown provides an evocative and historically contextualized account of Jesus Christ’s first visit to the temple in Jerusalem since his childhood, when at the age of twelve he traveled with his family. to attend Passover.

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the Latter-day Saint community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See S. Kent Brown, “Jesus’ First Visit to the Temple,” in The Temple: Symbols, Sermons, and Settings, Proceedings of the Fourth Interpreter Foundation Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, 10 November 2018, ed. Stephen D. Ricks and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2021), 235–66. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/the-temple-symbols-sermons-and-settings/.]

Brian C. Hales, “In Search of Global Context for the First Vision”

Richard E. Bennett Reviews, 1820: The dawn of the Restoration (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University / Salt Lake City Center for Religious Studies: Deseret Book, 2020). 380 pages. Hardcover, $ 31.99.

Abstract: Richard E. Bennett’s latest volume, 1820: The dawn of the Restoration, is not a book about the First Vision. Instead, he describes the world in 1820 through thirteen biographies that provide useful context for the founding event. Included are Napoleon Bonaparte, Jean François Champollion, Alexander I, Ludwig van Beethoven, Theodore Gericault, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, George IV / Queen Caroline, John Wesley / William Wilberforce / Hannah More, Simon Bolivar, John Williams, Henry Clay, Alexander Von Humboldt , and Joseph Smith. Topics of military conquest, music, science, literature, art, linguistics, religion, politics and the industrial revolution receive extensive coverage for 1820 and surrounding decades . While readers may not seek a broad understanding of the world that initiated the Restoration, this well-written and much-researched compilation would be an interesting and rewarding read.

Craig L. Foster, “Understanding the Year 1820”

Book Note: Richard E. Bennett, 1820: The dawn of the Restoration (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University / Salt Lake City Center for Religious Studies: Deseret Book, 2020). 380 pages. Hardcover, $ 31.99.

Abstract: Richard E. Bennett 1820: The dawn of the Restoration takes a look at this important year in a global historical context. He has produced a fascinating book for both Church members and nonmembers.

Stephen D. Ricks, “Psalm 105: Chiasmus, Creed, Covenant, and Temple”

Abstract: In this essay, Stephen Ricks takes a close look at the literary structure of a psalm, reintroducing us to chiasmus in modern and ancient texts, including the Book of Mormon, and then uses that literary structure to show how the psalm contains the historical credo of basis of the Israelites, as seen in Deuteronomy and reflected in 1 Nephi 17. Ricks goes on to show how an essential part of the Psalm is a covenant (“a binding agreement between man and God, with penalties for breach of the agreement ”), which connects it to the temple. Ricks shows this by emphasizing the points of the covenant: Preamble, examination of God’s dealings with Israel, terms of the covenant, formal witnesses, blessings and curses, and recitation of the covenant and deposit of the text. This form is maintained in Exodus 19, 20, 23, and 24, and in the Book of Mormon in Mosiah 1-6. Psalm 105 also follows this form. In sacrament prayers, which in Mormon understanding is a covenant, points 1 through 5 are also present.

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See Stephen D. Ricks, “Psalm 105: Chiasmus, Credo, Covenant, and Temple,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 157–170.  Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.]

***

I know. I know. I have let go of all of you who thirst for regular proof of the wrongdoing of religious belief and the damage done to society by religious organizations. I will try to do better this Bah Humbug holiday season. The opportunities should be plentiful, as this is a time of year when clerics and religious groups go out of their way to try to give the season a religious twist and exploit it for their shameless theological agendas. Here are, for example, some objects that I have just discovered in the Christopher Hitchens ‘How Religion Poisons Everything’ Memorial File© and which I hope will give you a delicious thrill of horror and just indignation:

“Donors will take part in #LightTheWorld in the largest single-event blood drive in Florida history”

“Light the World Giving Machines Debuts at Rockefeller Center in New York: New Location Available for Christmas Donations”


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New Korean research network seeks to unite Korean academics https://helviti.com/new-korean-research-network-seeks-to-unite-korean-academics/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 02:19:47 +0000 https://helviti.com/new-korean-research-network-seeks-to-unite-korean-academics/ A new interdisciplinary UI organization called the Korean Research Network held its inaugural Zoom conference on November 5-6. The network is a hub for professors pursuing Korean-related research in the Midwest. Intellectual interest in Korean culture is growing at the University of Iowa, due to Oscar-winning film “Parasite” and the popularity of K-pop, said Hyaeweol […]]]>

A new interdisciplinary UI organization called the Korean Research Network held its inaugural Zoom conference on November 5-6. The network is a hub for professors pursuing Korean-related research in the Midwest.


Intellectual interest in Korean culture is growing at the University of Iowa, due to Oscar-winning film “Parasite” and the popularity of K-pop, said Hyaeweol Choi, president of the Stanley Family and Korea Foundation in Korean Studies.

Choi, also a professor of religious studies and gender, women and sexuality studies at IU, said the interest prompted a new Korean research network to connect Korean culture scholars in Iowa and the Midwest.

Choi, who helped establish the Korean Research Network, said she visited the Korea Foundation, a South Korean non-profit organization, with the idea in 2019 after noticing that professors of Korea-related studies did not have a central network to share their research.

The network would play that role, and since 2019 it has done so, Choi said.

“The Korean Research Network could be a useful platform for students and early career researchers to present work in progress [and] get feedback, but also be connected with other academics in Iowa and the Midwest, ”she said.

The Korean Foundation was eager to support the project, donating $ 10,000 per year, while IU’s international programs gave $ 12,000 as seed funding to get things going, Choi said.

The network held its inaugural conference Nov. 5-6 on Zoom and served as a platform for its keynote speaker David Kang, professor of international relations and business at the University of Southern California, who was talking on North Korea’s nuclear program.

Choi said the network also has interdisciplinary aspects.

“Korean studies are very interdisciplinary, covering a large number of academic fields, such as history, genre, religion, communication, film and media studies, anthropology, sociology and political science, among others. “she said.

Russell Ganim, vice-rector of the IU and dean of international programs, also helped set up the network.

When he arrived at UI in 2011 as director of the World Languages, Literatures and Cultures division, Ganim said he believed there was a need to expand Korean studies as a result of the explosion of Korean pop culture across the United States.

He said the cause of this explosion can be attributed to the funding of arts and culture by the South Korean government.

In addition to the humanities, Ganim said researchers involved in the network are looking at the business environment and economic growth in Korea as well as the military tensions that exist in Korea.

Additionally, Choi said the network goes beyond providing a cursory glimpse into Korean society and culture.

“There is a lot of amateur and misinformed talk about Korea based on unsubstantiated knowledge or misinformation,” she said. “So we academics have to try to provide a much deeper understanding of history. “

One such in-depth scholarship is former IU sociology student Ji Hye Kim, who presented her thesis at a Korean Research Network conference.

She said her research focused on what she called the younger “sample generation” in South Korea, who are known to largely forgo dating, marriage and childbirth.

“There is a big trend, economic insecurity has increased, so the marriage rate and birth rate have dropped significantly in Korea recently,” she said. “So we want to know more about the reasons why people don’t get married and why they don’t have children and so on. “

Ganim said the importance of Korea’s pop culture was not the only reason for the creation of the new network.

“Korea has really become a player on the world stage,” he said. “Its emergence from the Korean War or really from colonization during WWII and before is simply astounding. “

Due to its modernization and importance after World War II, Choi said Americans can learn a lot about themselves through studying Korean society.

“Korea, as a case, could be very relevant to our understanding of American society in general,” Choi said. “I think this comparison might give us new ideas, new perspectives, but also nowadays we are literally interconnected on a global scale. Any kind of regional specification no longer makes sense.

Choi said the Korean Research Network will hold public lecture series and seminars in the spring of 2022, and she hopes next year’s fall conference will be held in person. Spring semester events, including a seminar on the #MeToo movement in February, will be posted on the website Korean research network website.


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Religious news for November 26, 2021 | Latest news https://helviti.com/religious-news-for-november-26-2021-latest-news/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 10:45:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/religious-news-for-november-26-2021-latest-news/ Mount Olive Baptist Church is located at 8412 White Shop Road in Culpeper. Church members will serve a free meal today at the Culpeper train depot from noon to 2 p.m. The late Joe Kratchovil was an active member of Culpeper Parish, who exhibited his work for the recent 75th anniversary celebration. Free meal today […]]]>

Free meal today at the DepotMount Olive Baptist Church will serve homemade hot soup and chili, cornbread, fruit and bottled water from noon to 2 p.m. today at The Depot, 111 South Commerce St. in Culpeper. Everyone is welcome. It’s a free event.

Vacation Declaration: Bishop BurbidgeFrom Bishop Michael Burbidge of the Catholic Diocese of Arlington:

“Thanksgiving is upon us. It’s a time in America when people of all faiths are expressing appreciation for God’s bountiful gifts including life, faith, family, friends, country, and the food that many of us enjoy around. of a table filled with love and joy.

“Our gratitude to God is beautifully reflected in the care and compassion we give to our neighbors who are hungry, who are homeless, who are sick, who are alone or who struggle with the burdens of daily life. Remember, whatever we do for the lesser of God’s children, we do for them. I ask you to pray for all who are vulnerable and to do your best to meet their needs.

“Know, in a special way, that I am very grateful to each of you, priests, deacons, seminarians, consecrated religious and lay faithful, for your prayers and your support. You are a special gift for me and our diocese! May we continue to encourage one another in the faith that unites us.

In this Thanksgiving, may we say “thank you” to our God of grace, source of all our good gifts. And may our lives reflect our appreciation in word and deed. Happy Thanksgiving to all of you.


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Should you focus on “improving the human experience”? https://helviti.com/should-you-focus-on-improving-the-human-experience/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 11:00:40 +0000 https://helviti.com/should-you-focus-on-improving-the-human-experience/ CONTENT FRESHNESS USEFULNESS Get insights on how to bring a more human experience and benefits to your workplace. If you buy something through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more. Which of the following quotes best describes your attitude towards work? “If this was supposed to be fun, they wouldn’t […]]]>

CONTENT

FRESHNESS

USEFULNESS

Get insights on how to bring a more human experience and benefits to your workplace.

If you buy something through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more.

Which of the following quotes best describes your attitude towards work?

“If this was supposed to be fun, they wouldn’t call it work.”

Or

“The master of the art of living makes little distinction between his work and his game, his work and his leisure, his mind and his body, his information and his recreation, his love and his religion. He barely knows who is who. He simply pursues his vision of excellence in everything he does, letting others decide whether he works or plays. For him, he always does both. ”? James A. Michener

Maybe a better question is: how do you want your team, your employees, and maybe your customers to feel about working with you?

Elevating the human experience: three paths to love and value at work”By Amelia Dunlop seeks to understand what workers expect from work. I recently received a review copy and I have to admit I had a mixed reaction and a lot of questions.

At first glance, I was dubious. Who wouldn’t after hearing things like “People are our greatest asset” or “We value emotional intelligence and servant leadership” only to go to work and experience something more like “I’m paying you.” to introduce you and make me money ”.

Then, as I started to read, I got curious. And I encourage you to do the same. What saved me from this book was that it was based on a study conducted by Dunlop of 6,000 people in the United States.

Amelia Dunlop integrates the human experience

Author Amelia Dunlop is Chief Experience Officer at Deloitte Digital and US Customer Strategy and Applied Design Leader. She helps organizations develop winning strategies that combine design, creativity and strategy.

“As marketers,” she says, “we have the opportunity to create more human experiences, gaining long-term loyalty and trust in the process. And that’s the focus of her work as she leads a team that uses human-centric design and insight strategies to focus on the human experience instead of just the customer experience.

It helps to know that Dunlop studied theology and then worked in management consulting for a company that highly valued “moral purpose”

Does raising people improve the bottom line?

Studies show that when employee needs are met, profitability can skyrocket. For example, a Gallup Survey 2020 found that companies with engaged employees can see their profitability increase by 23%.

gallup 2021 customer engagement results

In the “Foundation” section of the book, Dunlop reviews the five distortions of work. These are the behaviors that have hindered work and serve as a path to self-actualization. They understand:

  • Separate humanity from work. In our quest for employee management, we have replaced names with numbers and efficient transactions rather than relationships.
  • Head-to-heart price. We favor profitable performance over human commitment. For example, promoting people who achieve results in inhuman ways.
  • Work takes over our lives instead of being part of life. We reward and set expectations that employees and suppliers are “always on”.
  • The same work is evaluated differently depending on who does it. We still have a long way to go to compensate employees equally based on skill, contribution and task rather than gender and race.

Elevating the human experience empowers the individual

It’s no surprise that happy, engaged employees generate higher profits and productivity. And, of course, leaders are responsible for creating systems and cultures that engage employees.

But here’s where “Elevate the human experience“is a little different. It’s not necessarily written for the leader. It’s written for the individual. Instead of focusing on the people, systems and organizations you can’t change, Dunlop shows you how to lead and uplift those around you.

It does this by giving the reader three paths:

The first path is an inner path where you first learn to love yourself and recognize your own worth. This is the path of entrepreneurship.

The Second Path is to recognize the worth of another. In this journey, you are shifting the focus from yourself to another person in your life. I see this more as a work trip for another person; maybe a boss or a client.

The Third Way is to learn to recognize and love the people you work with every day. While this can easily apply to a business owner or executive, it can also apply to a small business owner or team member.

Dunlop calls these paths, but I tend to visualize them more as a ripple effect you might get when you throw rocks in a pond.

What you will appreciate “Elevate the human experience

“To elevate the human experience is to recognize intrinsic worth as a human and to nurture growth through love. “

If you are one of those people who have been frustrated by observing the futility of running businesses from a more human perspective, you will appreciate this book.

First, it is grounded in solid research which is expertly illustrated throughout the book.

percentage of people we talk about at work having raised the human experience book

As you can see from this image from the book, the illustrations appear to be hand drawn, giving them a very warm and human touch. Another advantage is that you will see how your answers might compare to the data.

Elevate the human experience ” show you how to hold yourself accountable, whatever your role in business; entrepreneur, employee or owner. You can read the book back and forth, or you can select the specific path you’re on and focus on that section.

No matter which path you choose to explore, expect to be uncomfortable. You might be uncomfortable because you are not used to seeing the word “Love” falling so freely in the workplace. Or, you might be uncomfortable because you will be dealing with how little “love” there is in your work environment.

Wherever you see yourself on the journey to a more humane workplace, you will discover ideas, strategies and ways to find your way into the world of work.

Image: amazon



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Politicians must protect voting rights https://helviti.com/politicians-must-protect-voting-rights/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 06:20:17 +0000 https://helviti.com/politicians-must-protect-voting-rights/ Senator Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.) Spoke on campus on Wednesday about the voting rights legislation in the United States. The event, titled “Race, Religion and the Assault on Voting Rights”, took place at the Lohrfink Auditorium and featured Warnock in conversation with Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Al.) And Rev. Jim Wallis , the first director of the […]]]>

Senator Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.) Spoke on campus on Wednesday about the voting rights legislation in the United States.

The event, titled “Race, Religion and the Assault on Voting Rights”, took place at the Lohrfink Auditorium and featured Warnock in conversation with Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Al.) And Rev. Jim Wallis , the first director of the Center for Faith and Justice, a research center that studies the intersection of faith and politics.

Voting is deeply linked to the human condition and should be a human right, according to Warnock.

“A vote is a kind of prayer for the world that we desire for ourselves and for our children,” Warnock said. “I believe it is sacred because at its core, voting is about your voice, and your voice is about your human dignity, and we have to stand up for that.”

This year alone, at least 19 states passed 33 laws that made it harder for Americans to vote, according to the Brennan Center for Justice. The laws include criminal charges for distributing water or snacks to voters in Georgia or submitting ballots to those who may need help voting in Iowa and Kansas. To compound the problem, Senate Republicans have invoked systematic obstruction on three occasions in the past year to block the advancement of legislation to protect voting rights.

Georgetown University | At an event titled “Race, Religion and Voting Rights Aggression,” guests including US Senator Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.) And US Representative Terri Sewell (D-Al.) Spoke about the need to adopt legislation on the right to vote.

Warnock, who is a pastor at Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church, said the crackdown on the franchise in his home state and across the country was contrary to American democratic values.

“What is happening in Georgia and across our country is very serious,” Warnock said at the event. “This is a total attack on our democracy, and those of us who believe in democracy must take this fight, and so I am deeply honored to be in this fight with you to fight for our country to fight for our democracy because I believe in democracy.

Making it easier to vote is a straightforward policy for politicians to support, Sewell says.

“Voting rights, especially among elected officials, shouldn’t be a partisan issue,” Sewell said at the event. “We should all want to, especially as elected officials, our constituents and the people to vote. After all, the vote is your voice in this democracy.

Sewell is the sponsor of HR 4, the John R. Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act of 2021, which establishes new criteria for states to receive prior approval from the US Department of Justice before making changes to laws that affect voting rights. Although the bill was passed by the House of Representatives on August 24, Republicans in the Senate blocked adoption of the bill in the Senate on November 3.

Warnock has also worked on Senate voting rights legislation, cosponsor S. 2747, the Freedom to Vote Act. The bill includes several provisions that deal with voter access and voter registration, such as extending advance voting and creating a national standard for voter validation. Senate Republicans obstructed the bill on October 20.

Voting rights help preserve other democratic rights and are central to the US mission, according to Warnock.

“It’s about expanding communities,” Warnock said. “For me, it’s deeper than any partisan political argument. I’m sitting here knowing you won’t win across the way. But this idea of ​​one person, one voice – it’s the alliance we have with each other as the American people, and we have to stand up for it with all our might. “

Warnock said politicians should push for voting rights legislation to restore confidence in the US government.

“We will continue to push the problem,” Warnock said. “But I think history will judge us harshly, and it should if we don’t find a way to do something about it.” We may have crossed a Rubicon that will prevent us from putting things back together for another generation. And so we have to do everything we can to pass these two bills. ”



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The rise of conspiracy theories and mistrust of science  – THE CAROLINIAN https://helviti.com/the-rise-of-conspiracy-theories-and-mistrust-of-science-%ef%bf%bc-the-carolinian/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/the-rise-of-conspiracy-theories-and-mistrust-of-science-%ef%bf%bc-the-carolinian/ Sydney thompson Senior Editor According to the CDC, as of November 10, 2021, 53% of North Carolina’s population eligible for vaccination were fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Experts at the CDC estimate that 70 to 90% of the eligible population must be vaccinated to obtain herd immunity against COVID-19. Collective immunity is one of the most […]]]>

Sydney thompson

Senior Editor

According to the CDC, as of November 10, 2021, 53% of North Carolina’s population eligible for vaccination were fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Experts at the CDC estimate that 70 to 90% of the eligible population must be vaccinated to obtain herd immunity against COVID-19. Collective immunity is one of the most important steps to end the pandemic.

The road to vaccination is far from over, but much progress has been made in convincing the American public to get vaccinated. These advances have revealed the distrust of the American public towards the scientific community.

“Vaccine skeptics claim they are waiting for injections to be proven safe and effective,” Celia Viggo Wexler said in her article for NBC. “We’re in a five-alarm fire and they’re wondering if the extinguishers are working. “

Mistrust of the scientific community has been on the rise for several years now. The anti-vaccine movement began in 1998 following Andrew Wakefield’s controversial study mistakenly linking autism to childhood vaccines.

According to Saad B Omar in Nature, a leading scientific publication for biomedical science, Wakefield’s legacy shaped the modern anti-vaccine movement.

“Fraudulent work on 12 children has fostered a non-existent link between autism and the MMR vaccine, used against measles, mumps and rubella,” Omar said. “It propelled Wakefield to notoriety and supercharged the anti-vaccine movement. He remains a headliner of the international skeptical vaccine circuit as once-defeated diseases return due to declining vaccination rates. “

However, vaccinations aren’t the only scientific topic under fire from skeptics.

Climate change has also been debated with many skeptics about the validity and extent of the effects of the temperature difference in Earth’s atmosphere. Mark Maslin of University College London looked back at these origins in November 2019, suggesting that the real concerns of those who did not understand climate science were being encouraged and reinforced by figures who benefited politically and financially from the denial of change. climate.

The stress of the pandemic and the use of health sciences have exacerbated these debates and doubts about the validity of the scientific process. There are conspiracy theories and groups of people with specific doubts, such as whether the earth is flat or not, or whether evolution is real.

Why is this such a big problem in America?

According to Andrew Jewett of the Boston Review, many scientists cite religious policy in America as the root cause of scientific disbelief and skepticism.

“You could start with the political influence of theologically conservative Christians over the last few decades,” Jewett said. “Today, its power is such that Republican leaders regularly speak out against ‘secularism’, in forms as varied as the right to abortion, strict church-state separation and Darwinism in schools. Theological conservatives also tend to reject climate science, viewing environmentalism as a dangerous socialist religion. “

Some of the problems also stem from the confusing and ever-changing nature of modern science.

To give a very basic example, chocolate is often in the news. Journalists presented countless studies on the air arguing for and against chocolate consumption, citing the most recent and recent studies.

The problem is that in the context of modern science, this study presented on the evening or daytime newscast is only a study on the subject. These studies are presented as the determining factor in determining the nutritional value of a daily chocolate bar while they are only one study among many.

Many studies are needed to draw conclusions from modern science.

There is also the simple fact that the general American public will not understand the advanced science in recent studies and will come away with some misconceptions about the material. They may also be concerned that they will feel like the scientific community has been glossed over as the anti-vaccination faction does, with rare side effects that sometimes occur.

Communicating with the American public is something the scientific community must take charge of if they are to fight the growing distrust of science. As many strive to debunk and combat misinformation, there is still a long way to go to prevent these misconceptions from taking hold in the first place.

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Harvard Researchers Launch $ 43 Million Global Human Development Study | New https://helviti.com/harvard-researchers-launch-43-million-global-human-development-study-new/ https://helviti.com/harvard-researchers-launch-43-million-global-human-development-study-new/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/harvard-researchers-launch-43-million-global-human-development-study-new/ Researchers at Harvard and Baylor University launched a $ 43.4 million research initiative last month to examine the causes of “human flourishing.” The initiative, announced on October 29, is the largest of its kind. The study covers 240,000 people from 22 countries. The study will collect data annually on various measures related to their well-being […]]]>

Researchers at Harvard and Baylor University launched a $ 43.4 million research initiative last month to examine the causes of “human flourishing.”

The initiative, announced on October 29, is the largest of its kind.

The study covers 240,000 people from 22 countries. The study will collect data annually on various measures related to their well-being over a five-year period. Gallup, an analytics and consulting firm known for its opinion polls, and the Center for Open Science, a nonprofit that aims to increase transparency in research, have also joined the partnership.

Human flourishing means “living in a state in which all aspects of a person’s life are good,” according to Tyler J. VanderWeele, professor of epidemiology at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and director of Human Flourishing Harvard Program.

VanderWeele, who is co-director of the study, said he hopes the study can more rigorously assess the wide variety of factors that affect a person’s well-being.

“We often do a really good job of studying physical health and income – it’s really important, but people care more than that,” he said. “They also care about being happy, about having meaning and purpose, about trying to be a good person and about their relationships.”

Study co-director Byron R. Johnson, who heads Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion and is a professor of social sciences there, said the concept of fulfillment is “much broader than happiness.”

“That’s why the survey instrument itself is so important – because it measures a number of things,” he said. “Do you have meaning in your life? Do you have a purpose for your life? Are you happy with where you are heading? “

The survey will test six domains to build a “thriving index” – including questions on life satisfaction, goal, and mental and physical health – and use nationally representative sampling.

“This is not a convenience sample, it’s based on Gallup’s survey infrastructure, which they’ve developed over the past 15 years,” VanderWeele said. “We will recruit into the study a group of people who at least roughly represent the demographic and cultural characteristics of the entire country.”

The study will be the “world’s first longitudinal panel,” which means it collects multidimensional data over time, according to Joe Daly, a senior partner at Gallup.

“These types of studies are increasingly rare because they are so expensive and require a lot of work,” Johnson said. “We wanted to do something that would help us get things done on the types of causal analyzes, so that we didn’t always have to rely on correlational studies. “

Daly also said the study will be one of the first to examine all of the major world religions, unlike previous religion studies which tended to focus on Judaism or Christianity.

“We are going to examine the construction of spirituality, religion and human flourishing through all these major religious and cultural groups in the same methodology, with the same questionnaire, so that there is the possibility of starting to see what these things look like across these different religions, ”he said.

In partnership with the Center for Open Science, this thriving study will make its data accessible to the public.

“We really hope that this will contribute not only to our own research, but to the research of others and to the study and promotion of well-being in the world,” VanderWeele said.

Johnson said the researchers are “optimistic” that the study could extend beyond five years or extend to more countries.

“We hope we will have 30 countries before it’s all said and done,” he said. “If we can go on for 10 years and 10 waves of data, then nothing has ever happened like this before. “

—Editor-in-Chief Ariel H. Kim can be contacted at ariel.kim@thecrimson.com.

– Editor Vivi E. Lu can be contacted at vivi.lu@thecrimson.com.


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What not to talk about at Thanksgiving dinner | Christina steinorth powell https://helviti.com/what-not-to-talk-about-at-thanksgiving-dinner-christina-steinorth-powell/ https://helviti.com/what-not-to-talk-about-at-thanksgiving-dinner-christina-steinorth-powell/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 16:05:14 +0000 https://helviti.com/what-not-to-talk-about-at-thanksgiving-dinner-christina-steinorth-powell/ As a marriage and family therapist and relationship expert, my busiest time of year seeing patients is from Thanksgiving until New Years Eve. The reason is that people are very anxious about meetings. of family. To help you Avoid sitting on the therapist couch this holiday season, I’ve put together a list of things to […]]]>

As a marriage and family therapist and relationship expert, my busiest time of year seeing patients is from Thanksgiving until New Years Eve. The reason is that people are very anxious about meetings. of family. To help you Avoid sitting on the therapist couch this holiday season, I’ve put together a list of things to avoid at the Thanksgiving table.

RELATED: 50 Conversation Starters That Have Absolutely Nothing to Do With Coronavirus

7 topics to avoid in the conversation during the holidays.

1. Family drama past and present.

When thinking about what not to talk about at Thanksgiving dinner, be sure to avoid existing or past family dramas. Discussing the existing family drama will usually result in each member of the family taking sides.

There’s not a single good thing that happens at a family reunion when people start teaming up against each other (except of course when you’re playing touch football to work that extra piece of pie off). pumpkin).

There is nothing worse than bringing up past problems within the family. For example, when mum says “do you remember when you were 16 and you didn’t come out of your room to eat with us because we didn’t want to let you go out with so and so?”

When something like this happens, you can say something like, “Mom, let’s not talk about negative things from the past. Let’s stay in the moment and enjoy each other’s company. ”

The risk of this maneuver is that Mom will be upset that you have placed a limit on her behavior. But you matter too. It’s okay to have limits on how you let others treat you.


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