Religion studies – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 00:39:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Religion studies – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 University asks faculty to ‘remain neutral’ on abortion discussions in class https://helviti.com/university-asks-faculty-to-remain-neutral-on-abortion-discussions-in-class/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 00:39:18 +0000 https://helviti.com/university-asks-faculty-to-remain-neutral-on-abortion-discussions-in-class/ As abortion restrictions become law in states across the country, faculty and staff in some of those states face increasing limits on what they can say about reproductive health. In some cases, the vagueness of untested laws coupled with the threat of felony prosecution has scared scholars and even some students out of talking about […]]]>

As abortion restrictions become law in states across the country, faculty and staff in some of those states face increasing limits on what they can say about reproductive health. In some cases, the vagueness of untested laws coupled with the threat of felony prosecution has scared scholars and even some students out of talking about what was only recently a constitutional right.

On Friday, the University of Idaho sent its employees guidance on what they can and cannot say about abortion under a statewide ban that came into force in August. The restrictive advice even ventures into the classroom.

In an email, the university’s general counsel tells employees that Idaho can make it a crime to perform an abortion, promote abortion, counsel people in favor of abortion , to refer someone for abortion, to provide facilities or training to perform abortions, to contract with an abortion provider, or to advertise abortion or “prevention of abortion” services. design “.

The university said employees who interact with students should “act with caution at all times when a discussion turns to reproductive health, including abortion.” In conversations with students about reproductive rights, university employees should say that they are prohibited from promoting abortion in any way, the email states. The sooner employees specify this, the more the email is specified, the better.

The councils acknowledged that Idaho’s law was “not a model of clarity,” particularly when it comes to contraception. To be conservative, the attorney general’s email said the university should not provide birth control.

The guidelines said that University of Idaho employees can always direct students to sources of information outside of the university or to another state, “where students can receive a discussion about everything aspects of the subject and being introduced all alternatives legally available to them. But in doing so, “university employees must remain neutral on the subject of abortion.” (There is a Planned Parenthood facility less than 10 miles from the University of Idaho in Pullman, Washington.)

The university can also provide condoms, as long as they are “for the purpose of helping to prevent the spread of STDs” and not for birth control. Employees can have class discussions “on topics related to abortion or contraception,” but they must be “limited to discussions and topics relevant to the topic of the class.” Instructors must remain “neutral” on the subject of abortion in the classroom or risk legal action, the email states.

Faculty members at the University of Idaho expressed deep concern about the counseling and what it meant for conversations they might have with their students about abortion.

“It makes us complicit in enabling the rift between religion and state to be broken,” said Leontina Hormel, a sociology professor at the University of Idaho. She said the new rules run counter to her obligation to help students think critically about important topics.

Dianne Baumann, assistant professor of anthropology and Native American studies, discussed the advice with her anthropology class on Monday. Many of her students already knew this, she said, and they had many questions. For example, if a student is also a university employee, can they voice their opinion on abortion when off-campus or on social media? Baumann did not know the answer.

In an interview with The the Chronicle, Baumann said she was in her vehicle, off campus. She was careful not to speak to a reporter about the tips while on college property.

Instructors must remain “neutral” on the subject of abortion in the classroom or risk legal action, the email states.

“I don’t know any professors who stand up there preaching their views on abortion and reproductive rights,” she said. On the contrary, faculty members try to teach students to talk about the subject with respect. “We talk about it in class as it should.”

But now, with the threat of crime looming over their heads, Baumann wondered if faculty members would avoid the subject altogether.

“Nobody wants to take a risk with this,” she said. The concern, she said, is that part of a conversation could be recorded and taken out of context and then broadcast by conservative media. (Last year, a “worried community leader” contacted Boise State University because he believed a white student had been made to cry in class during a discussion about white privilege. L university suspended a series of diversity and ethics classes and investigated, only to find the incident did not take place as alleged.)

Russell Meeuf, a journalism and mass media professor, was concerned about the University of Idaho’s guidance because it did not appear to align with state policy. academic freedom policy. Meeuf worked with a group of faculty members and administrators from four-year colleges around the state to update the policy last year. He was concerned that the University of Idaho’s new guidelines requiring professors to express neutrality on the subject of abortion would violate policy.

“The idea of ​​neutrality is an impossible concept to define,” Meeuf said. A faculty member presenting empirical research on reproductive health may feel they remain neutral, while a student who is against all abortions may not see it that way. “If it’s not clear where neutrality starts and stops, then they might be afraid to engage in those discussions,” Meeuf said.

In an emailed statement, a university spokesperson said the guidance was intended to help employees understand the legal meaning of Idaho’s new law.

“This is a difficult law for many and has real ramifications for individuals in that it calls for individual criminal prosecutions,” she said. The law “provides that no public funds ‘shall be used in any way to…promote abortion.’ The article does not specify what is meant by the promotion of abortion, but it is clear that university employees are paid with public funds. Employees who engage in their work in a way that promotes abortion could be seen as promoting abortion. Although abortion may be discussed as a political issue in the classroom, we strongly recommend that employees in charge of the classroom remain neutral or risk violating this law. We support our students and employees and support academic freedom, but understand the need to follow the laws established by our state. »

Idaho isn’t the only state where people on campus are feeling the chilling effect of state laws banning abortion. In Texas, state law prohibits not only offering an abortion, but also helping someone obtain one. Jacqueline Aguirre, a senior at the University of Texas at El Paso and a member of Frontera Folx, a group that educates the community about reproductive health and rights, said the group no longer talks about abortion.

“We can’t say anything at the risk of being criminalized,” she said.

And in Georgia, two members of Congress wrote a letter to the president of the University of Georgia asking that the university stop funding a research project that collects information on pregnancy centers in crisis, which generally seek to dissuade women from having abortions.

The University of Idaho told employees the administration will continue to try to gather and share information about the new legal landscape. How these laws will be enforced by the state, according to the email, remains to be seen.

]]>
Explore the life of Sri Aurobindo https://helviti.com/explore-the-life-of-sri-aurobindo/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 19:50:54 +0000 https://helviti.com/explore-the-life-of-sri-aurobindo/ Matriprasad completed his studies at the Sri Aurobindo International Center for Education in 1975 and then joined Sri Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry. Currently, he assists the Ashram administrators in their administrative responsibilities. He also teaches the social and political philosophy of Sri Aurobindo at the undergraduate level. He has a keen interest in English, French, […]]]>

Matriprasad completed his studies at the Sri Aurobindo International Center for Education in 1975 and then joined Sri Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry. Currently, he assists the Ashram administrators in their administrative responsibilities. He also teaches the social and political philosophy of Sri Aurobindo at the undergraduate level. He has a keen interest in English, French, Sanskrit and Urdu poetry, classical arts and Hindustani classical music.

Karmayogin: Political Writings and Speeches, 1909-1910

Reading by Matriprasad

There comes a time when a person reaches a fork in the path of life; from then on, their lives move on an identifiably divergent arc. Usually, the milestone indicating such a junction is significant on a very personal level – an event that can be either deeply inspiring or overwhelming. For Sri Aurobindo, one of these defining events was the period from May 1908 to May 1909.

In 1906–07, SriAurobindo was recognized as one of the most influential and outstanding leaders of the radical faction of political movements of the time. He spoke, wrote and inspired great masses of people by convincingly expounding the creed of complete Indian independence. Many of the ideas taken for granted today were considered somewhat impractical at the turn of the 20th century. Colonialism was an established fact, and the envisioned emancipation of subject nations was considered the chimera of a few lunatics. It was at this time that Sri Aurobindo forcefully argued that for India, swaraj (total freedom) was the only ideal worth pursuing and, furthermore, that every nation had an inherent right to self-determination and to shape one’s own destiny.

Naturally, the Raj chose to retaliate. In May 1908, Sri Aurobindo was arrested and charged with sedition for daring to wage war against the King-Emperor. For about a year, he endured incarceration as a prisoner on trial. Living conditions in a colonial prison were extremely dehumanizing and often left prisoners scarred and psychologically broken. However, for Sri Aurobindo, the period triggered an ascent to a higher level of self-realization.

The prison doors that sealed him off from the world, mysteriously or rather miraculously, opened his eyes to a higher level of freedom. While the outside world was full of anxiety and feelings about the outcome of his trial, he himself was totally indifferent to the unfolding of events in the courtroom, for he was living, according to his own account, splendid spiritual experiences during those days in prison. . From then on, the idea of ​​achieving political freedom for India, although still implicit in his vision, was complemented by a broader vision. Henceforth, he advocated that the philosopher’s stone of India would be the emergence of spiritual awareness among his countrymen, and his touch would not only bring political freedom to the country, but also elevate national life to a new level of spirituality. ‘personal development.

Therefore, after Sri Aurobindo’s acquittal, he launched two journals: Karmayogin (June 1909-February 1910) in English and Dharma (1909-1910) in Bengali (see Chapter 7). What was Sri Aurobindo trying to accomplish by launching Karmayogin? He wanted to awaken his compatriots to the need for a greater ideal than mere political freedom:

The task we set ourselves is not mechanical but moral and spiritual. We are not aiming at changing a form of government but at building a nation. Of this task, politics is a part, but only a part.

This volume contains the articles published in Karmayogin. The choice of title (meaning, divine worker) indicates the shift in emphasis towards the pursuit of a more conscious and explicit practice of reaching a higher spiritual ideal on a national level. The cover page of every issue of Karmayogin bore an image of Shri Krishna as Arjuna’s charioteer, when the hero went into battle. Below the image would be a shloka from the Bhagavad Gita – Shri Krishna urging Arjuna to remain grounded in a spiritual state, calm and free from desires, and yet, while remaining so, immerse himself in valiant action and relentless of battle, offering everything, including his actions and the result of his actions, to the Divinity within himself.

It should also be noted that at the bottom of the front cover, the newspaper proclaimed the contributors as “Aurobindo Ghosh and others”. Although the journal contained articles by other people, much of the material published in it was by Sri Aurobindo.

To underscore the power and necessity of the emergence of this greater idea, Sri Aurobindo turned to his own epiphany. The very first article in this volume is the text of a speech he gave in Uttarpara, a suburb of Calcutta (now Kolkata). The event took place just after his release, following his acquittal, and it was in fact his first public appearance after his release from prison. It was also the first and last event where Sri Aurobindo spoke in public about his own personal spiritual experiences. He recalled the circumstances of his arrest and the “realization in prison, of God in us all, of the Lord in the nation”. He remembered how the secret Divinity that dwells in the hearts of men had revealed itself to him and assured him of the protection extended to him. He said: ‘I knew I would come out. The year of detention was only meant for a year of isolation and training.

He was invited to speak in Uttarpara by the Society for the Protection of Religion. Indeed, he said the pursuit of such a goal was the work ahead. But what was this religion to which the Indians must dedicate themselves? He said, “What we call the Hindu religion is really the eternal religion, because it is the universal religion which embraces all others. If a religion is not universal, it cannot be eternal.

He did talk about nationalism, but now there is a clear shift in focus: previously, he could have said that nationalism should be pursued as a religion; now it was self-devotion to Sanatana Dharma (the universal religion) which constituted in itself the only true nationalism, its very heart.

I no longer say that nationalism is a creed, a religion, a faith; I say that it is the Sanatana Dharma which for us is nationalism. This Hindu nation was born with Sanatana Dharma, with it moves and with it grows. When Sanatana Dharma declines, then the nation declines, and if Sanatana Dharma were able to perish, together with Sanatana Dharma it would perish. Sanatana Dharma is nationalism.

Later, he urged Indians not to abandon old programs like Swadeshi and to boycott:

The only message we can give you, in such circumstances, is the message to hold on. If you can’t move forward, see that you haven’t backed down. Stand firm in the Swadeshi, stand firm in your denial of partition recognition, stand firm in the national movement that uplifts India.

(Excerpted with permission from ‘Reading Sri Aurobindo’ Edited by Gautam Chikarmane and Devdip Ganguli, Rs 599, published by Penguin)

]]>
Eat cultured meat without killing. Part Three: Hindus? Jains? https://helviti.com/eat-cultured-meat-without-killing-part-three-hindus-jains/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 15:58:30 +0000 https://helviti.com/eat-cultured-meat-without-killing-part-three-hindus-jains/ Eat cultured meat without killing. Part Three: Hindus? Jains? Hindu food. Will meat grown without killing be attractive to Hindus? Jains? In this series of Patheos articles on public theology, we began by asking ourselves in part one: should we eat cultured meat without killing? Then, in part two, we asked Jewish studies scholar Sam […]]]>

Eat cultured meat without killing.

Part Three: Hindus? Jains?

Hindu food. Will meat grown without killing be attractive to Hindus? Jains?

In this series of Patheos articles on public theology, we began by asking ourselves in part one: should we eat cultured meat without killing? Then, in part two, we asked Jewish studies scholar Sam Shonkoff: Is cultured meat kosher? We continue a discussion started by our friends in Kerela, India, who recently addressed the “Global Food Crisis and Food Justice” in the magazine Peace Lumina.

A priori, the widespread consumption of cultured meat – also called cultured meat, in vitro, lab-grown artificial meat – could make a substantial contribution to human and planetary flourishing. Cultured meat could provide affordable protein for the many victims of the current global food crisis. Cultured meat could reduce or even eliminate animal slaughter. Finally, cultured meat could indirectly contribute to restoring our planet’s fertility by reducing pasture and reducing methane gas emissions. The science of meat culture has its detractors, of course. Still, it’s time to prepare for the future.

What we need at this stage of the game is to solicit theological and ethical responses from religious traditions. What exactly do the various religious traditions hold about the relationship between humans and animals? What food practices have developed? What theological reasoning led to these practices? And could the notion of meat grown without killing stimulate new theological thinking and perhaps a change in practice?

Could cultured meat appeal to vegetarians?

In the first article in this series on meat grown without killing, we asked about vegetarianism in India. We noted how the Pew Research Center reports that the vast majority of Indian adults (81%) follow certain restrictions on meat in their diet, including abstaining from certain meats, not eating meat on certain days, or of them. However, most Indians do not completely abstain from meat – only 39% of Indian adults describe themselves as “vegetarian”, according to a new survey from the Pew Research Center. Although there are many ways to define ‘vegetarian’ in India, the survey left the definition up to the respondent.

Let’s specifically ask about Hindus and Jains. We’ll ask Rita Sherma.

Global food crisis and food justice

Meet Rita Sherma

Rita Sherma is Associate Professor of Dharma Studies and Director of the Center for Dharma Studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. Professor Sherma is co-founder of the Hinduism Program Unit at the American Academy of Religion. She is also the founding vice-president of DANAM (Dharma Academy of North America) – a learned society for research in Hindu, Buddhist and Jain religious and interfaith studies – and is vice-president of the Society for Hindu-Christian Studies.

Professor Rita D. Sherma, Director of Dharma Studies, Graduate Theological Union

Quite relevant to the issue of cultured meat is Professor Sherma’s ongoing scholarship in the name of restoring the fruitful health of planet Earth. She is an ecotheologian. She recently co-edited an important book, Religion and sustainability: interreligious resources, interdisciplinary responses. She is the ideal person to provide succinct and precise answers to our questions.

Question 1. What do you think would be the response of a Hindu vegetarian to the prospect of eating cultured meat?

Rita Sherma. Hindus and Jains would not eat cultured meat for two reasons. First, there is the problem of the desire for meat from other sentient beings which is not considered conducive to spiritual advancement. Second, there is no need. Indeed, Indian cuisine – with its variety of delicious dishes created from protein sources derived from various vegetable sources such as various lentils, legumes, milk solids (paneer), etc. – offers flavor and satisfaction to those who love savory Indian cuisine. .

Question 2. What is your own theologically thoughtful answer?

Jain food

Rita Sherma. The food chain has grown and evolved through a natural process. It is therefore not intrinsically immoral. However, from the perspective of various religious ethics, we can hurt ourselves morally by indulging in the slaughter and consumption of other sentient beings. This is being researched by studies that examine brutality towards animals and chart the trajectory to more serious crimes – to crimes against other humans. Some Hindu traditions do not allow eating meat. But others allow it. Jainism absolutely forbids it.

And after?

This is where we have been.

Eat cultured meat without killing. part one

Eat cultured meat without killing. Part Two: Is It Kosher?

Eating Cultured Meat Without Killing, Part Three: Hindus? Jains?

And after? Ask LDS theologian Lincoln Cannon to report on the place of animals in Mormon theology.

Authors

Brian Brozovic is a student at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary and Ted Peters is Professor Emeritus at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary in Berkeley, California, USA. Visit Professor Peters’ website: TedsTimelyTake.com.


]]>
Religious appropriation also depends on whiteness https://helviti.com/religious-appropriation-also-depends-on-whiteness/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 18:10:40 +0000 https://helviti.com/religious-appropriation-also-depends-on-whiteness/ (Getty/Andrii Lutsyk/Ascent Xmedia) MMost progressive liberals are aware of the dangers of borrowing from racially marginalized communities. My students are no exception. They quickly identify and condemn forms of cultural appropriation when white people adopt styles from communities of color for financial gain or to increase their coolness quotient. Which is to say that we […]]]>

(Getty/Andrii Lutsyk/Ascent Xmedia)

MMost progressive liberals are aware of the dangers of borrowing from racially marginalized communities. My students are no exception. They quickly identify and condemn forms of cultural appropriation when white people adopt styles from communities of color for financial gain or to increase their coolness quotient. Which is to say that we are in a very important cultural moment of awareness of systemic racial injustice. We are willing to consider racial borrowings as probably ethically burdensome. And this is a good thing.

But few seem to care or even notice when religious borrowing causes harm. In fact, quite the opposite. Religious combination is not only common, but also encouraged as a way to engage in religious practice without having to submit to religious institutions, hierarchies, and doctrines. It is a method of obtaining the spiritual benefits of religions without losing individual autonomy. What is spiritual but not religious if not a commitment to borrow religious practices while remaining foreign to religious communities, a situation conducive to appropriation?

When concerns are raised, religious appropriations are defended by calling them something else based on their liberal motives – politics, education, therapy – a tactic that hides the harm they can cause religious communities. In my latest book, steal my religion, I explore three cases of borrowing that were all motivated by goals that we would consider “good” from a liberal point of view: demonstrating an alliance with a religious minority (wearing a hijab of solidarity), learning a religious rite of going through a first-hand experience (studying abroad on the Camino de Santiago), and a therapeutic treatment based on a religious practice (practicing yoga). In each case, I found that these motivations were not sufficient to prevent poor outcomes. Simply put, liberal intentions led to illiberal results.

Given how susceptible many of us are to racialized forms of cultural appropriation, why do we have such a blind spot when it comes to forms of religious appropriation? I think one answer is that we don’t understand that race is fundamental to religious appropriation as well. When borrowings come from cultures associated with black communities, we know white supremacy is at stake. But one thing surprised me while conducting research for steal my religion was how central race was to understanding the ethics of religious borrowing as well. Whiteness motivated every case of borrowing I looked at and white supremacy in one form or another was a reason why borrowing was harmful, and therefore properly called appropriation.

The first case study I discuss is the solidarity hijab – wearing an Islamic headscarf to signal opposition to gender-based Islamophobia – such as the #HeadscarfForHarmony campaign which was launched following the Christchurch massacre in New Zealand . This campaign encouraged non-Muslim women to wear a hijab to protest violence against Muslims, but many Muslims experienced it as a false form of white wedding ring.

Black Islam and Muslim fashion scholar Kayla Renée Wheeler described the solidarity hijab for the #HeadscarfForHarmony campaign like erasing and called the campaign a liberal virtue signaling, “People can congratulate each other”, she tweeted“without doing anything meaningful/useful. I think it’s harmful. Layla Poulos, author and activist, stressed how the gesture was temporary. “Keep in mind,” she tweeted“many non-Muslim women who wrap themselves in a headscarf for a day of ‘solidarity’ will take it off and snuggle up with the same ideologies and the same men who make us dangerous.”

The Muslim women who spoke out the loudest against the #HeadscarfForHarmony campaign on social media were black. And it was no coincidence. Black Muslim women saw something different because, living amid overlapping patterns of oppression (Islamophobia, misogyny, and white supremacy), they are used to being erased, tokenized, and exploited. For black Muslim scholars and activists, the solidarity hijab was a form not only of gendered Islamophobia, but also of white supremacy.

Let’s look at my second case study: an educational program on the Camino. The Camino de Santiago, or “the Way of St. James”, is a popular pilgrimage route through northern Spain, where legend has it that the bones of St. James the Apostle are buried. This trip is a Catholic pilgrimage, but Catholic pilgrims are in the minority. I hiked a section of the Camino five times with students as part of an experiential study abroad program I led from 2013-2017 for Northeastern University. The goal of this study abroad program was to increase religious literacy, but I now realize that the program has reinforced a Christian-centered, whitewashed narrative of Spanish history.

Historically, the Iberian Peninsula, where the Camino is located, was home to a wide range of religious traditions, including Celtic, Greek and polytheistic practices. The Christians did not obtain a stronghold until the Visigothic occupation in the 5th century, which ended in 711, when the Visigothic decline allowed the Muslim Moors of North Africa to claim this territory. Islamic rule of the region known today as Spain lasted for seven centuries. Many historians regard this period of Islamic rule as the golden age of Spanish intellectual and artistic production, even as the rest of Europe was stuck in the Dark Ages.

However, there is another way to describe the period of Moorish rule in Spain: as the invasion and occupation of the Iberian Peninsula by foreign forces that Christians fought to expel for over 700 years. And this is the most common narrative in Spain today.

Now consider the role of the Camino in the context of these competing accounts of Spanish history. As a result, the moment of the discovery of the tomb of Saint-Jacques around 813 is significant. This provided the Christian authorities with a means to bring more Christians to the area at a time when they were trying to overthrow Islamic rule.

But there is more. Legends circulated that St. James inserted himself into the growing tensions between Christians and Muslims by miraculously returning as the figure of Matamoros, or Moor Slayer, a knight helping to defeat the Muslim Moors. There are still visual depictions of Matamoros all over Spain, including in Santiago Cathedral, crushing the heads and bodies of the Moors under the hooves of his white steed. This means that the Camino is a pilgrimage not only to the tomb of the Apostle St. James, but also to a medieval Anglo-European knight celebrated for murdering non-white North African Muslims in order to “return” Spain to his imaginary Christian roots. But most pilgrims don’t know this version of the story or Saint James, and literally walk past the scene of the crime. So while the Camino’s very existence depends on a violent history of religious pluralism in which race plays a central role, its popularity today depends on erasing that history.

The role of whiteness in popularizing yoga – my third and final case study – is also clear. When yoga arrived in the United States around the turn of the 20th century and physical postures were tied to devotional yogic beliefs, it was met with suspicion. This yoga was too eastern, too alien, and frankly too related to bodies of color to become mainstream for white Americans. For yoga to become mainstream, it was cleansed of its devotional meanings and presented in comfortable spaces for white people.

For example, when my mother was introduced to yoga in the early 1970s, it was not from an Indian guru, but from Lilias Folan, a white woman in a leotard whose popular PBS show introduced yoga to a generation of women. white Americans. Folan’s postures and simple meditation techniques seemed slightly exotic at the time, which was part of their appeal, but they were also presented in an accessible and comfortable way for my white Protestant mother.

Rumya Putcha, a South Asian performance studies specialist, shares a powerful story on her research blog, Namaste Nation, which illustrates the role of yoga in creating public white spaces. When Putcha lived in Texas, she was a member of a local yoga studio. Another member who was a white woman used a pun, “Namastay together”, which offended Putcha as a desi woman. But when she voiced her concerns, the white member spoke to the studio owner and Putcha was asked to leave the studio. This illustrates what can happen when white privilege is triggered. The studio was happy to borrow from South Asian culture to make its members’ yoga experience more “authentic,” but true South Asian members would be left out if they questioned that appropriation.

If Americans are more sensitive to racial appropriation than to religious appropriation because we assume that only the former is involved in white supremacy, then we fail to see how the latter is also dependent on whiteness. I agree that there is something particularly egregious when white people appropriate practices associated with non-white communities. But a black-white racial binary is not the only way whiteness is implicated in creating exploitative conditions for appropriation.

The ideology of whiteness manifests itself in various ways in forms of religious appropriation – when practices associated with bodies of color are adopted by white agents, when histories of racism are erased, and when forms of appropriation position White Americans as the appropriate interpreters of the “true” meaning of a practice. Whiteness is part of what makes religious appropriation possible and popular in the first place, then seen as morally neutral.

So the next time you see others borrowing a religious practice, or you yourself do so, consider applying the same scrutiny you would apply to cases of cultural appropriation where the role of race appears more obvious. Religious minorities are racialized, white Protestantism is embedded in many of our laws and institutions, and race is part of the historical narratives that are promoted and left behind. There are likely to be racial implications in the spiritual practice you pursue for your well-being or personal fulfillment. Just because you can borrow something doesn’t mean you should always.

Liz Bucar is Professor of Religion, Dean’s Leadership Fellow, and Director of Sacred Writes at Northeastern University. An expert in comparative religious ethics, Bucar is the author of four books and two edited collections, including Stealing my religion: not just any cultural appropriation. His public scholarship includes signatures in Atlantic, The Los Angeles Timesand teen vogueas well as several radios and podcast interviews.

]]>
Denial of right to remove LGBTQ student group Yeshiva University suspends all student clubs https://helviti.com/denial-of-right-to-remove-lgbtq-student-group-yeshiva-university-suspends-all-student-clubs/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 17:12:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/denial-of-right-to-remove-lgbtq-student-group-yeshiva-university-suspends-all-student-clubs/ LGBTQ+ students at Yeshiva University (YU) wanted their own organization, the YU Pride Alliance. Like all bands with common interests, they wanted to celebrate their commonalities, offer each other support and encouragement, and socialize with like-minded people — you know, like the chess club. But YU backed down, saying it went against their religious beliefs. […]]]>

LGBTQ+ students at Yeshiva University (YU) wanted their own organization, the YU Pride Alliance. Like all bands with common interests, they wanted to celebrate their commonalities, offer each other support and encouragement, and socialize with like-minded people — you know, like the chess club.

But YU backed down, saying it went against their religious beliefs. And it compromised their ability to discriminate “the other,” as their instruction manual insisted they do.

The student group sued in state court and won. The Court argued that although YU had many religious elements, it was first and foremost an educational institution. While places of worship – synagogues, churches and mosques – could discriminate as they pleased, YU did not fall into this category. You don’t even have to be Jewish (although you do have to take Jewish studies) to attend college.

Judge Lynn Cotler explained her decision thus,

“Yeshiva is a university that primarily provides pedagogical education. The religious character of the Yeshiva, evidenced by the required religious studies, observance of Orthodox Jewish law, student attendance at religious services, etc., are all secondary to the primary purpose of the Yeshiva.

The question went to the Supreme Court of the United States where, somewhat surprisingly, Roberts and Kavanaugh joined liberals in saying that the school should stop hurting people – at least temporarily. The case now goes to state court, where it will decide what it will decide. And the case will undoubtedly fall to SCOTUS anyway.

YU was not happy. And he retaliated by temporarily closing all student organizations on campus. What a whistle crisis.

As NPR reported:

Katie Rosenfeld, attorney for the YU Pride Alliance, said the decision to cancel all club activities “rather than accept an LGBTQ peer support group on campus is a throwback to 50 years ago , when the city of Jackson, Mississippi, closed all public swimming pools rather than comply with court desegregation orders.”

Too? Barely. Christians used the Bible—especially Ham’s story—to justify their enslavement of black Africans and their Jim Crow laws against new post-war African American citizens.

Far be it from me to deprive someone of their religious freedom – until they use it to discriminate against their fellow citizens. No religion should give anyone the right to be a fanatic in the public square. And YU is in the public square.

Of course, the school authorities don’t see it that way. As Rabbi Ari Berman, president of YU, wrote:

“Every faith-based university in the country has the right to work with its students, including its LGBTQ students, to establish the clubs, places and spaces that correspond to its religious tradition. Yeshiva University simply seeks that same right to self-determination. The Supreme Court has given us the road map to find a speedy remedy and we will follow its instructions. At the same time, as our commitment and love for our LGBTQ students is unwavering, we continue to reach out inviting them to work together to create a more inclusive campus life consistent with our Torah values.

To say that you are committed to your LGBTQ students and that you love them, but at the same time tell them that they are not part of your values, is a little rude. It’s like saying you love your dog by beating him with a stick.

I am not an expert in theology and dogma. In a debate with a Talmudic scholar, they would knock me out in the first round. However, I was educated in Anglican schools, so I have a familiarity with the Bible. In religious tradition, Moses wrote the Pentateuch or Torah, which includes Genesis. Modern scholarship indicates that the traditionalists are wrong, as the Torah was written centuries after the death of Moses.

Which means an anonymous guy wrote it. Keeping this in mind, Genesis 1:26-27 says:

26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, in our likeness, that he may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over cattle and all wild animals and over all creatures that move on the ground.

27 So God created man in his image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.

I always thought it was a trick that God could appear both male and female. But I’ll play along. Why can’t God also be gay and straight? Or transgender?

I realize there are later bible verses where iron age scribes wrote a list of no-no’s including gay intimacy. But there are many other prohibitions that many religious people are now unaware of. And while women benefited back then, most religions have grown enough to recognize that women should be allowed to own property and vote. But for some reason (probably because they don’t want to imagine two men having sex), religious fundamentalists can’t get past homophobia.

Religion can be a boon to the faithful. But I’m sad that some religions have to keep hating people just for who they are.

As the anthem says:

“All things bright and beautiful
All creatures big and small
All things wise and wonderful
“It is God who created them all”

]]>
[ GENERAL STUDIES PAPER – 1 ] : UPSC MAINS CIVIL SERVICES IAS EXAM 2022 QUESTION PAPER https://helviti.com/general-studies-paper-1-upsc-mains-civil-services-ias-exam-2022-question-paper/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 06:44:34 +0000 https://helviti.com/general-studies-paper-1-upsc-mains-civil-services-ias-exam-2022-question-paper/ DOWNLOAD TEST QUESTIONS DOCUMENT: UPSC CSE MAINS 2022 MAINS UPSC GENERAL STUDY DOCUMENT – 1 MAINS 2022 GENERAL STUDIES PAPER – 1 1. How would you explain that the sculptures of medieval Indian temples represent the social life of that time? (Answer in 150 words) 10 2. Why did the armies of the British East […]]]>

DOWNLOAD TEST QUESTIONS DOCUMENT: UPSC CSE MAINS 2022

MAINS UPSC GENERAL STUDY DOCUMENT – 1 MAINS 2022

GENERAL STUDIES

PAPER – 1

1. How would you explain that the sculptures of medieval Indian temples represent the social life of that time? (Answer in 150 words) 10

2. Why did the armies of the British East India Company – mostly made up of Indian soldiers – consistently win against the larger and better equipped armies of the Indian rulers? Give reasons. (Answer in 150 words) 10

3. Why has there been a sudden resurgence of famines in colonial India since the middle of the 18th century? Give reasons. (Answer in 150 words) 10

4. Describe the characteristics and types of primary rocks. (Answer in 150 words) 10

5. Discuss the meaning of the color coded weather warnings for cyclone prone areas given by the Indian Meteorological Service. (Answer in 150 words) 10

6. Discuss the potential natural resources of the “Deccan Trap”. (Answer in 150 words) 10

7. Examine the potential of wind energy in India and explain the reasons for their limited spatial diffusion. (Answer in 150 words) 10

8. Explore and assess the impact of “working from home” on family relationships. (Answer in 150 words) 10

9. How is the growth of Tier 2 cities related to the emergence of a new middle class emphasizing consumer culture? (Answer in 150 words) 10

10. Given the diversity of tribal communities in India, in what specific contexts should they be considered as one category? (Answer in 150 words) 10

11. The political and administrative reorganization of states and territories has been a continuous process since the middle of the 19th century. Discuss with examples. (Answer in 250 words) 15

12. Discuss the main contributions of the Gupta period and the Chola period to Indian heritage and culture. (Answer in 250 words) 15

13. Discuss the importance of lion and bull figures in Indian mythology, art and architecture. (Answer in 250 words) 15

14. What forces influence ocean currents? Describe their role in the fishing industry around the world. (Answer in 250 words) 15

15. In describing the distribution of rubber-producing countries, indicate the main environmental problems they face. (Answer in 250 words) 15

16. Mention the importance of straits and isthmuses in international trade. (Answer in 250 words) 15

17. The troposphere is a very important atmospheric layer that determines meteorological processes. How? (Answer in 250 words) 15

18. Analyze the importance of “sect” in Indian society vis-à-vis caste, region and religion. (Answer in 250 words) 15

19. Are tolerance, assimilation and pluralism the key elements in the constitution of an Indian form of secularism? Justify your answer. (Answer in 250 words) 15

20. Elucidate the relationship between globalization and new technologies in a world of scarce resources, with particular reference to India. (Answer in 250 words) 15


  • Follow us on our official website TELEGRAM Channel HERE
  • Subscribe to our official YouTube channel HERE
  • Our official Facebook page HERE
  • Follow us on twitter HERE
  • Follow our Instagram ID HERE
  • Subscribe to our Podcast Channel HERE

]]>
US Supreme Court asks Yeshiva University to license LGBT student club https://helviti.com/us-supreme-court-asks-yeshiva-university-to-license-lgbt-student-club/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 22:18:50 +0000 https://helviti.com/us-supreme-court-asks-yeshiva-university-to-license-lgbt-student-club/ By Andrew Chung (Reuters) – Yeshiva University cannot ban an LGBT student club after the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to block a judge’s ruling ordering the New York Jewish school to officially recognize the group. The judges, in a 5-4 decision, declined to stay a state court ruling that a city anti-discrimination law […]]]>

By Andrew Chung

(Reuters) – Yeshiva University cannot ban an LGBT student club after the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to block a judge’s ruling ordering the New York Jewish school to officially recognize the group.

The judges, in a 5-4 decision, declined to stay a state court ruling that a city anti-discrimination law required it to recognize YU Pride Alliance as a student club, while the he school was pursuing an appeal in a lower court.

The ruling appeared to send the case back to the state court system. “The request is denied because it appears that the plaintiffs have at least two other expedited or interim remedies available to them in state court,” the decision reads.

Conservative justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett dissented. Liberal Judge Sonia Sotomayor had temporarily blocked the lower court’s order last Friday while judges considered the university’s request.

YU Pride Alliance formed informally as a group in 2018, but Yeshiva determined granting it official status would be “inconsistent with the school’s Torah values ​​and the religious environment it seeks to maintain.” .

The dispute is partly about whether the Yeshiva is a “religious society” and therefore exempt from New York City’s human rights law, which prohibits discrimination by location or service provider. public accommodation.

New York State Judge Lynn Kotler ruled in June that the school’s primary purpose was education, not religious worship, and that it was subject to anti-discrimination law. Kotler also rejected the university’s argument that forcing him to recognize the club would violate his religious freedom protected by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

After senior state courts in August refused to stay the judge’s ruling, Yeshiva turned to the US Supreme Court, pointing to its religious nature, including that undergraduates are required to engage in intense religious studies.

“As a deeply religious Jewish university, the Yeshiva cannot comply with this order as it would violate its sincere religious beliefs about how to train its undergraduate students in Torah values,” the school told Reuters. the Supreme Court.

In a dissent Wednesday, Alito wrote, “The First Amendment guarantees the right to free exercise of religion, and if that provision makes sense, it prohibits a state from enforcing its own preferred interpretation of Holy Scripture. Yet that is exactly what New York did in this case, and it is disappointing that a majority of this court refuses to award relief.

The Modern Orthodox Jewish University, based in Manhattan, has about 6,000 students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs. Among the school’s values, according to its website, are a belief in “the infinite value of every human being” and “the responsibility to reach out to others with compassion.”

Pushed by its increasingly assertive conservative justices, the US Supreme Court in recent years has expanded religious rights while narrowing the separation between church and state.

During his tenure that ended in June, the court backed a Washington state public high school football coach who refused to stop leading Christian prayers with players on the field after the matches and ruled in favor of Christian families in Maine who sought to access taxpayer money to pay for their children to attend religious schools.

During its next term, which begins Oct. 3, the court will decide a major new legal battle pitting religious freedom against LGBT rights involving an evangelical Christian web designer’s free speech claim. which she cannot be forced under a Colorado anti-discrimination law to produce gay marriage websites.

(Reporting by Andrew Chung in New York; Editing by Will Dunham)

]]>
“Memorial of Jain Queen Rani Chennabhairadevi to be built near Karwar” https://helviti.com/memorial-of-jain-queen-rani-chennabhairadevi-to-be-built-near-karwar/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:30:01 +0000 https://helviti.com/memorial-of-jain-queen-rani-chennabhairadevi-to-be-built-near-karwar/ Mysore/Mysore: Sri Dharmasthala Manjunatheshwara (SDM) Vice President of Educational Institutions D. Surendra Kumar said that a memorial for the Jain Queen Rani Chennabhairadevi will be built at the upcoming theme park near Karwar, the headquarters of Uttara Kannada district. He was speaking after the inauguration of the two-day national seminar on “Jain Religion: Pro-Social Thoughts” […]]]>

Mysore/Mysore: Sri Dharmasthala Manjunatheshwara (SDM) Vice President of Educational Institutions D. Surendra Kumar said that a memorial for the Jain Queen Rani Chennabhairadevi will be built at the upcoming theme park near Karwar, the headquarters of Uttara Kannada district. He was speaking after the inauguration of the two-day national seminar on “Jain Religion: Pro-Social Thoughts” organized on Monday by Center for Jain Literature Studies, Hampi Kannada University and SDM Women’s College, Mysuru , at SDM Women’s College, Krishnamurthypuram.

Stressing that Rani Chennabhairadevi from Gerusoppa was a great warrior who repelled the Portuguese invasion, Surendra Kumar regretted that the queen did not receive her due. As such, Dharmasthala Dharmadhikari Dr. Veerendra Heggade, who is now an RS MP, had requested from the government an area of ​​10 acres for the construction of her memorial. Now the government has sanctioned the land and the memorial will be erected at the theme park near Karwar, he said, adding that the memorial will feature the Queen’s life and brave deeds, photographs, literature and documentaries.

Noting that much of the Jain religion is focused on pro-social thoughts, Surendra Kumar said the religion strongly advocates non-violence. Religion is centered on the idea of ​​living and letting others live, he added.

The Vice Chancellor of Hampi Kannada University, Dr SC Ramesh, who presided, said the Jain religion had made a huge contribution to the country.

Arguing that Jain literature is full of social thoughts, human values ​​and life stories, he said it is important to read it. The essence of all other religions is also the same as that offered in Jain literature, he added.

Kannada Advisory Board Member of Kendra Sahitya Academy Dr. Padmini Nagaraj said that the preaching of the Jain religion is not limited to the Jain faith. Stressing the need to maintain peace and harmony between communities, she said it was important for everyone to lead a harmonious life at this critical time.

Dr. Jayakumar Upadhye, Director of Prakrit National Institute for Studies and Research (Shravanabelagola), Dr. Tharihalli Hanumanthappa and Professor GC Rajanna, Senior Professor of SDM Women’s College, Sainath Malligemadu and others were present.

The Seminar will end today, with the farewell at 4 p.m.

]]>
Suspicious package at Newark, NJ airport delays flights https://helviti.com/suspicious-package-at-newark-nj-airport-delays-flights/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 20:10:57 +0000 https://helviti.com/suspicious-package-at-newark-nj-airport-delays-flights/ NEWARK — Dozens of flights at Newark Liberty International Airport were delayed Sunday due to reports of a suspicious package, according to reports. Around 1 p.m., the official EWR Twitter account said Levels 1 and 2 of Terminal C had been closed to traffic. However, there was no immediate information about the cause of the […]]]>

NEWARK — Dozens of flights at Newark Liberty International Airport were delayed Sunday due to reports of a suspicious package, according to reports.

Around 1 p.m., the official EWR Twitter account said Levels 1 and 2 of Terminal C had been closed to traffic. However, there was no immediate information about the cause of the closures.

Videos posted to Twitter around 1 p.m. show a heavy police presence outside Terminal C. The Essex County Sheriff’s Bomb Disposal Unit vehicle can be seen outside the terminal.

A suspicious package was found in the bathroom, according to the Port Authority Police Department, PIX 11 reported. The item was removed and people were allowed to return to the terminal around 1:45 p.m.

Authorities reportedly said 59 flights were delayed and arriving United Airlines flights were being held until 2.30pm.

The Port Authority Police Department did not immediately return a request for information from New Jersey 101.5.

Rick Rickman is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at richard.rickman@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

See 20 ways America has changed since 9/11

For those of us who lived through 9/11, the events of the day will be etched in our minds forever, a terrible tragedy that we cannot forget and do not want to forget. Now, two decades later, Stacker looks back on the events of 9/11 and the many ways the world has changed since then. Using information from news reports, government sources, and research centers, here is a list of 20 aspects of American life that were forever altered by the events of that day. From language to air travel to our handling of immigration and foreign policy, read on to see how life in the United States has been affected by 9/11.

Never Forget: Notable 9/11 Memorials in New Jersey

There are a number of memorials in New Jersey dedicated to remembering the lives of residents lost in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Sites range from gardens to parks and plaques to statues.

]]>
Man’s Books Help Spread God’s Word | News, Sports, Jobs https://helviti.com/mans-books-help-spread-gods-word-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 05:17:27 +0000 https://helviti.com/mans-books-help-spread-gods-word-news-sports-jobs/ MIDDLEBURG – The path to inspiration can often be as winding as the journey of a lifetime. For one local man, the inspiration was drawn from a self-proclaimed duty to make the world a better place. Harold “Hal” Lerch of Middleburg, a retired engineer, recently published his 25th book, “Modern Morals” […]]]>


MIDDLEBURG – The path to inspiration can often be as winding as the journey of a lifetime. For one local man, the inspiration was drawn from a self-proclaimed duty to make the world a better place. Harold “Hal” Lerch of Middleburg, a retired engineer, recently published his 25th book, “Modern Morals” available on amazon.com. The new book discusses the role of television in influencing the way we think. According to Lerch, television has changed perceptions, especially when it comes to religion.

“What bothers me the most is when religious people are portrayed as weird lunatics,” said Lerch. “TV shows establish atheism as the norm.”

Lerch started spreading the word in 1962 as a 12-year-old paperboy delivering The Sentinel to subscribers on Logan Street in Lewistown. The job instilled a strong work ethic. He graduated from Lewistown High School in 1968 before graduating from Penn State’s College of Engineering. He started writing in 2001 when he “felt the need to write from the perspective of biblical creation.” He retired in 2009 and resumed writing in 2018.

Lerch combines his engineering background with biblical studies. He sees the gap between creation science and secular science. He believes that independent thought, modern science and archeology support the Bible, although science and the mainstream media relegate many biblical references to myth.

“In terms of evolution, how does a dinosaur become a bird? The escape clause used by secular science is “given enough time, there is always an explanation, but they don’t know how.

Writing was the tool Lerch used to satisfy his passion for truth, but he felt he could do more. To help carry his message, Lerch founded Word to the World Ministries, an organization that publishes and distributes Christian resources in more than 60 languages. The site is available at https://www.word2world.com.

Lerch’s books have now been translated into 75 languages ​​and have become very popular; 1.2 million copies have been downloaded worldwide. Titles include books on Bible studies and Christian living, storybooks for young children, and an adventure series for teens. His books support the idea that the Bible is the Word of God and records real and historical events. Lerch offers his books on Amazon and Google Books. Paperbacks and e-books are offered on Amazon.

Besides his own writings, Lerch has helped others. In July 2019, amazon.com released “God in the Bullpen: The Randy Lerch Story” by Randy Lerch with Harold Lerch. Randy Lerch was a pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies in the late 1970s. The book details his baseball battle with alcohol and amphetamines before God saved him.

Years removed from his paper journey, Harold Lerch continues to spread his message to millions of readers.

He and his wife, Jeanne, have two children, eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. They reside near Middleburg.




Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox










]]>