Religion studies – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:37:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Religion studies – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 Learn more about conservation and trust from Indigenous societies https://helviti.com/learn-more-about-conservation-and-trust-from-indigenous-societies/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:10:34 +0000 https://helviti.com/learn-more-about-conservation-and-trust-from-indigenous-societies/ Twenty-five years ago, when I was a young anthropologist working in northern Siberia, the native hunters, fishers, and trappers I lived with would often stop and solemnly offer something to the tundra. It was usually small in size, like coins, buttons, or unlit matches. But it was considered essential. Before going on a hunting or […]]]>

Twenty-five years ago, when I was a young anthropologist working in northern Siberia, the native hunters, fishers, and trappers I lived with would often stop and solemnly offer something to the tundra. It was usually small in size, like coins, buttons, or unlit matches. But it was considered essential. Before going on a hunting or fishing trip, I was asked if I had changed my coat. If I didn’t, someone would get me some so it was handy. We also left other goodies, like wild reindeer fat to feed on the fire.

I was intrigued. Why do these things? Their responses were usually “We are the children of the tundra” or “We are making these sacrifices so that the tundra will give us more animals to hunt next year”.

These practices are part of what I and other anthropologists call ‘traditional ecological knowledge’. Beliefs and traditions about the natural world are central to many indigenous cultures around the world, bringing together what industrialized cultures consider science, medicine, philosophy and religion.

Many academic studies have debated whether Indigenous economies and societies are more conservation or ecologically oriented than others. Certainly, the idealized stereotypes many people hold about Indigenous groups being one with nature are simplistic and potentially damaging to the groups themselves.

However, recent studies have pointed out that conservationists can learn a lot from TEK about successful resource management. Some experts argue that traditional knowledge must play a role in global climate planning because it promotes “cost-effective, participatory and sustainable” strategies.

Part of TEK’s success stems from how it fosters trust. This takes many different forms: trust between community members, between people and nature, and between generations.

Understanding Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Looking more closely at TEK’s components, the first, “tradition”, is something learned from ancestors. It’s transmitted.

“Ecological” refers to the relationships between living organisms and their environment. It comes from the ancient Greek word for “house” or “dwelling”.

Finally, the earliest uses of the term “knowledge” in English refer to the recognition or possession of something, the admission of something, and sometimes the acknowledgment of a person’s position or title. These now obsolete meanings emphasize relationships – an important aspect of knowledge that modern usage often overlooks, but which is particularly important in the context of tradition and ecology.

Combining these three definitions helps generate a framework for understanding Indigenous TEK: a strategy that encourages respect for ancestral ways of life. It is not necessarily about strict “laws” or “doctrines” or simply observation of the environment.

TEK is a way of looking at the world that can help people connect the land they live on, their behavior, and the behavior of the people they are connected to. Indigenous land practices are based on generations of careful and insightful observation of the environment and help define and promote “virtuous” behavior in it.

As an American commuter living in a remote community in Siberia, I was always learning what was “appropriate” and “inappropriate”. Many times people would tell me that what I or someone else had just done was a “sin” in relation to TEK. When someone’s aunt died one year, for example, community members said it happened because their nephew had killed too many wolves the previous winter.

The author teaches how to cut dwarf willow the right way to use it in a summer pot, or tent, for smoking caribou meat. John Ziker, CC BY-NC-ND

Similarly, after stopping to assess the freshness of some reindeer tracks on the tundra, a hunter told me, “We let these local wild reindeer roam in the middle of winter so they come back year round. next and for future generations. Here, TEK lays out the potential environmental impacts of greed, which in this case would mean overhunting.

Concepts like these are not isolated to Siberia. Much work has been done to examine the parallels between ancestral systems of deference in Siberia, the Amazon, North America, and other regions.

Trust and tradition

These examples illustrate how TEK is a set of systems that foster trust by encouraging deference to ancestral ways of inhabiting the world.

The moderation of self-serving behavior requires such confidence. And the trust that the environment will provide — caribou to hunt, for example, or ptarmigan to trap — depends on the idea that people will treat the environment respectfully.

Previously, I studied prosociality – behavior that benefits others – in northern Siberian practices of food sharing, childcare, and hunting land use.

These aspects of life are based on the idea that the “true” owners of natural resources are the ancestors and that they punish and reward the behaviors of the living. Such ideas are encouraged by elders and leaders, who praise virtuous and prosocial behavior while linking negative outcomes to selfishness.

Trust is an essential component of reciprocity – exchange for mutual benefit – and prosociality. Without trust, it makes no sense to take risks in our relationships with others. Without trust, we cannot cooperate or behave in non-exploitative ways, such as environmental protection. This is why it is advantageous for societies to monitor and punish non-cooperators.

A number of small items are strewn across the top of a sled sitting in a field.
An abandoned reindeer sleigh, probably a grave, with several personal items. We have no right to disturb it, it would be disrespectful to the dead, who are considered the true owners of the earth. John Ziker, CC BY-NC-ND

In other words, minimizing the use of resources today to improve the future requires trust and the mechanisms to enforce it. This is also true in larger social formations, even between nations. Groups must trust that others will not use resources they themselves have protected or abuse their own resources.

‘Be responsible to your descendants’

Today, many environmental experts want to integrate the teachings of indigenous societies into climate policies. This is partly because recent studies have shown that environmental outcomes, such as forest cover, for example, are better in indigenous protected areas.

It also stems from a growing awareness of the need to protect the rights and sovereignty of indigenous peoples. TEK cannot be “mined”. Outsiders should show deference to knowledge holders and respectfully solicit their views.

One idea societies can embrace in their fight against climate change is the importance of trust, which can seem hard to come by these days. Young activist Greta Thunberg’s Fridays for Future initiative, for example, highlights ethical issues of trust and responsibility between generations.

Many outdoor enthusiasts and sustainability organizations insist on “leaving no trace”. In fact, people always leave traces, no matter how small – a recognized fact in Siberian TEK. Even footsteps compact the ground and affect plant and animal life, however careful they may be.

A maxim closer to TEK and more precise might say: “Be responsible to your descendants for the traces you leave behind.”The conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

This MFP Voices essay does not necessarily represent the views of the Mississippi Free Press, its staff, or its board members. To submit an essay for the MFP Voices section, send up to 1,200 words and fact-checking information to [email protected] We welcome a wide variety of viewpoints.

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What to do with monks who misbehave? https://helviti.com/what-to-do-with-monks-who-misbehave/ Sun, 15 May 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/what-to-do-with-monks-who-misbehave/ Sunday marked the day of Visakha Bucha which is the commemoration of the birth, enlightenment and death of Lord Buddha. Buddhism is the largest religion in Thailand, but we cannot deny that faith in Buddhism has declined due to inappropriate behavior and misconduct by some monks. Over the past few months, the media has reported […]]]>

Sunday marked the day of Visakha Bucha which is the commemoration of the birth, enlightenment and death of Lord Buddha. Buddhism is the largest religion in Thailand, but we cannot deny that faith in Buddhism has declined due to inappropriate behavior and misconduct by some monks.

Over the past few months, the media has reported news of many monastic members, including high-ranking monks – such as abbots – engaging in sexual and other misconduct. A recent monk scandal concerns the case of Phra Kato, 23, at Wat Pen Yat in Chawang district, Nakhon Si Thammarat, who had sex with a 37-year-old woman. For this reason, Phra Kato, or Pongsakorn Chankaew, was forced to leave monastic life.

Phra Kato was well known for his humorous preaching videos on social media. After leaving Aconite, Pongsakorn became even more well known. When he appeared in public, people wanted to take pictures with him or were excited to see him. The media reported that he earned more than when he was a monk. Pongsakorn earned 30,000 baht for a monastic event. Currently, he can earn between 30,000 and 60,000 baht for a 30-minute appearance and a singing performance of four or five songs.

People who support Pongsakorn usually mention his background and that he has a good heart. When Pongsakorn was 13, he made his living doing shadow puppet shows. He had dreamed of being a singer and one day became a participant in a televised singing contest, Mic Thongkam (Golden microphone). Viewers felt sympathy towards him because he said on the show that his mother had lung cancer and needed medicine which cost 700 baht a day. Due to her mother’s illness, Pongsakorn dropped out of college to care for her. He became a monk because of a promise made to his late mother.

Pongsakorn Chankaew’s Facebook account has over 500,000 followers. Pongsakorn Chankaew Facebook Account

Pongsakorn’s followers were touched that he was a good son who devoted himself to his late mother and believed he had a good heart and was innocent. They accused the 37-year-old of being a seductress who tempted Pongsakorn, which is ridiculous. They are both equally guilty. Obviously, Pongsakorn was a good son, but he was not a good monk. A good monk would never spend time alone with a woman and would never ask a woman to massage him. He knew the precepts of Buddhism very well and therefore had to take responsibility for his actions.

Besides sexual misconduct, Pongsakorn agreed to withdraw 600,000 baht from Wat Pen Yat’s bank account to cover up his sex scandal. The former monk knew it wasn’t his money, so his followers can’t claim he’s innocent.

It is rare to see people admiring immoral public figures, although Pongsakorn is not the first case.

In 2017, when Preeyanuch Nonwangchai was accused of killing and dismembering another woman, people were wowed by her beauty. The police took pictures with her. On social media, people expressed their admiration and formed fan clubs. While some admitted these “clubs” were just a joke, it was still in bad taste. It seems frightening to admire a cold-blooded thief or murderer simply because of his physical appearance.

One good thing that came out of the Phra Kato sex scandal is that the Katoon Dam in Nakhon Si Thammarat has become a popular tourist destination. The reservoir was where the former monk spent time with his lover. On May 3, Katoon Dam was the most sought-after spot for unseen tourist destinations in Thailand. Many Thais posted on their social media accounts to show they had visited the infamous dam. Although the dam attracted tourists due to an immoral incident, it had positive consequences. Tourists reported that they were pleased with the sight and atmosphere of the dam. Local merchants and vendors were pleased with the increased traffic.

After numerous scandals, the House Panel on Religion discussed changing the law to punish monks and women who have sex. The amendment will include one to five years imprisonment, or up to 100,000 baht fine, or both. Hopefully, the punishment will make monks think twice about misbehaving and may prevent women from approaching them.

However, I think a sexual relationship is something personal. He should not be punished with imprisonment or a fine. Monks who commit sexual misconduct must leave monastic life. Moreover, monks and women involved in sex scandals should not be admired or become celebrities after breaking the precepts of Buddhism. Being ignored or rejected by society can be more effective than being punished by law.


Suwitcha Chaiyong

Writer for the Life section

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Tonight: The Voices 3.0 Concert Kicks Off in Downtown Marshall | Events https://helviti.com/tonight-the-voices-3-0-concert-kicks-off-in-downtown-marshall-events/ Sat, 14 May 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/tonight-the-voices-3-0-concert-kicks-off-in-downtown-marshall-events/ Eleven local singers have been named winners of the Marshall Symphony Orchestra’s annual Voices 3.0 competition and will perform with the orchestra tonight. The Voices 3.0 concert will begin Saturday at 8 p.m. outside the Harrison County Courthouse in the east side parking lot. Food will be available for sale at Saturday’s event beginning at […]]]>

Eleven local singers have been named winners of the Marshall Symphony Orchestra’s annual Voices 3.0 competition and will perform with the orchestra tonight.

The Voices 3.0 concert will begin Saturday at 8 p.m. outside the Harrison County Courthouse in the east side parking lot.

Food will be available for sale at Saturday’s event beginning at 6:30 p.m., with catering service by La Taquiera and Lee Lee’s Catering.

Tickets for the annual show are already on sale for $30 in advance and $35 at the door. An additional student discount is also available. Community members can purchase tickets by visiting www.marshallsymphony.com.

Winners featured on Saturday include:

Crispy Joe Buck resides in Marshall and is originally from East Texas. He is the general manager of KMHT Radio and works as an agent with the oldest insurance agency in East Texas, Brownrigg Insurance. He believes he has a passion for helping people and working to improve the lives of others that comes from a strong family work ethic where his father always involved all six children in the family businesses. Joe Buck graduated from East Texas Baptist University with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and a minor in Religion. He was an active member of choirs and pop groups throughout college and worked hard to successfully fund his education through these organizations, as well as travel and record with a successful gospel trio. Joe has been married for 19 years, has three children, and is actively involved in his church as a worship leader before the service. You can hear Joe Buck daily as host of “The Talk of East Texas” on KMHT 103.9 FM. Joe Buck was a finalist for Voices 2020.

Chase Dawson is from Carthage and is married to Peyton West Dawson of Marshall. They have a baby boy named Daxton Beau Dawson, soon to be big brother to Lillie Mae Dawson, due in August. Growing up in a musical family, Chase’s love for music began at an early age. Every Sunday after church there were always guitars drawn with good music played and family songs accompanied by a beautiful harmony. Music has become more important in her life over the past eight years. Chase has been the lead singer of the Carthage-based country and Southern Texas rock band “Southern Impact” for seven years. He is very involved in all the activities of the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame, also in Carthage, in addition to being president of what he likes to call his baby, the Country Music Hayride. The Hayride manages and preserves the historic 1949 Esquire Theater located in downtown Carthage. Music keeps him very busy, and he likes it because it keeps him out of trouble.

Caitlin Drennan is from Gilmer and is 16 years old. She likes to sing all genres of songs but considers country and western her favorites. Earlier this year, she was selected to sing with the National FFA Chorus in Indianapolis and had the opportunity to sing a solo for the 60,000 people in attendance. Saturdays in the spring and fall, her mornings are spent at Miracle League Baseball games, where she performs the national anthem, and next month she will sing the national anthem at the Gladewater Rodeo. She recently began singing with a worship team for ‘The Gathering’, a contemporary service for First United Methodist Church in Gilmer and in June will perform at a Gladewater Opry reunion, where she has been a regular performer. Caitlin can’t wait to sing with the Marshall Symphony!

Karinthia Fradella is 24 years old and was born and raised in Marshall. She always had a love for music but never pursued her love until she was 17 when she auditioned for “American Idol.” At the age of 20, she auditioned for “The Voice”. Karinthia started singing at the Legends Social Club in Marshall to become more comfortable singing in front of a crowd. Her close friend, Miriam Black, a local singer and karaoke DJ, became her friend and mentor shortly after her first performance at Legends. Karinthia said, “Miriam believed in me when I didn’t, and I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for her.” Recently, she auditioned again for American Idol. She said she would continue to audition for American Idol until she got to Hollywood. Karinthia works at Blue Cross Blue Shield but is very determined to have a music career in the future.

Tim Goff lives in Linden and works at GG’s Antiques in Jefferson. He has been singing since age 6 in church plays and musicals at the Life Tabernacle in Houston. Tim has previously sung in a school and church choir. He is known for singing at work, entertaining and – according to him – sometimes annoying his clients. He has always loved music in many forms and genres. Tim loves karaoke goofy songs to make his audience laugh. He also loves pointless random facts, trivia, and corny jokes.

Missy Monroe comes from Carthage. She and her husband Brian have been married for 21 years and own Monroe Brothers Paint & Body Shop in Carthage. Together they share four children and four grandchildren. She and her husband are members of the group Dusty Boots and perform a monthly show at the Esquire in downtown Carthage on the second Saturday of each month. Missy makes her third appearance in Voices 3.0.

Mary Lynne O’Neal was born and raised in Marshall, and she is the daughter of retired DPS soldier David O’Neal and Lynn O’Neal. Mary Lynne has been singing since the age of 4 and caught the radio bug at 17 working for KMHT. She landed a college internship working for the Big D & Bubba morning show in Nashville and stayed in Nashville for 12 years, singing in a few local bands and working for Cold River Records and Foundry Records. In December 2020, Mary Lynne returned home to Marshall and began working at the new radio station, 92.3 The Depot. Mary Lynne hosts the afternoon show on 92.3 The Depot as “Hometown Girl” Monday through Friday from 3-7 p.m. Mary Lynne also works as an event coordinator for Bear Creek Smokehouse and is a member of the Marshall Main Street Advisory Board, the Marshall Elks Lodge and the Grand Marshall Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors.

Laura Perry has lived in Marshall for 27 years. She and her husband Russ have been married for 45 years. They have two adult children and five grandsons. Laura works at the Red Poppy Salon and Day Spa in Marshall as a receptionist. Laura started singing when she was in fourth grade on her radio on her back porch. His favorite part was harmonizing with the background vocals. She has performed extensively in East Texas and has a long history with theater and music. Laura studied Musical Theater and Acting at Tarrant County College and served as Vice President of Piney Woods Theater in Marshall. Laura starred as Diamond Bessie in Jefferson for 10 years and was the Costume Guild Master of the Longview Community Theater for five years. Recently, she has participated in fundraisers for ArtsView Children’s Theater and CASA East Texas. While in Dallas, she provided vocals and studio voiceover for 10 years. Laura is very excited and honored to be part of Marshall Symphony Orchestra Voices 3.0 this year.

Quinn wonders is from Flint, Michigan and has lived in Marshall for seven years with her husband Jeff. This is Quinn’s third appearance on Voices. She has acted in many productions and has loved singing and dancing since a young age. She sang all her life and always found music to be the best medicine. Quinn shares that singing with the orchestra and all the great singers has been a great experience!

Tori Wells is 16 years old and lives in Waskom. She has been singing for her family and friends since she was 4 years old. Tori began singing publicly at age 10 and volunteered to sing in numerous veterans programs throughout Harrison, Panola and Gregg County. She recently sang for CASA by Caddo Parish. His love of music spans country, pop, rock, R&B, as well as musicals. Tori was a finalist for Voices 2.0 in 2021 and the John Ritter Tribute Showcase in Carthage last year.

Presley West is 15 years old and in the ninth grade at Marshall High School. She is a varsity cheerleader and a Texas Rage Allstar cheerleader. Presley studies vocal, guitar, and piano lessons weekly and performs at area festivals and Oprys. She is also enrolled in modeling and acting classes, is an honor roll student, and is the proud aunt of Daxton Dawson. Presley is making her third appearance in the Voices series and is excited to once again participate in Voices 3.0.

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China defends arrest of Hong Kong Catholic cleric Joseph Zen as Western alarm grows https://helviti.com/china-defends-arrest-of-hong-kong-catholic-cleric-joseph-zen-as-western-alarm-grows/ Thu, 12 May 2022 08:42:16 +0000 https://helviti.com/china-defends-arrest-of-hong-kong-catholic-cleric-joseph-zen-as-western-alarm-grows/ More than 180 Hong Kongers have been arrested under the national security law so far. (Case) Hong Kong: China on Thursday defended the arrest of a 90-year-old Catholic cardinal under Hong Kong’s national security law, a move that sparked international outrage and deepened concerns over Beijing’s crackdown on freedoms in the financial center. Retired Cardinal […]]]>

More than 180 Hong Kongers have been arrested under the national security law so far. (Case)

Hong Kong:

China on Thursday defended the arrest of a 90-year-old Catholic cardinal under Hong Kong’s national security law, a move that sparked international outrage and deepened concerns over Beijing’s crackdown on freedoms in the financial center.

Retired Cardinal Joseph Zen, one of Asia’s top Catholic clerics, was among a group of democracy veterans arrested on Wednesday for “colluding with foreign forces”.

Cantonese pop singer Denise Ho, veteran lawyer Margaret Ng and prominent cultural studies scholar Hui Po-keung were also arrested, the latter as he attempted to travel to Europe to take up an academic post.

“The persons involved are suspected of conspiracy to collude with foreign countries or foreign forces to endanger national security, an act of a serious nature,” said the commissioner’s office, which represents the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Beijing to Hong Kong.

The four were arrested for their involvement in a now-disbanded defense fund that helped pay the legal and medical bills of those arrested during the huge and sometimes violent wave of anti-democracy protests three years ago.

China has responded with a massive campaign to crush the movement and transform the once-free city into something more like the authoritarian mainland.

Zen and his colleagues, who were released on bail on Wednesday evening, join more than 180 Hong Kongers arrested so far under the national security law imposed by Beijing to stop protests.

Defendants are usually denied bail and can be sentenced to life in prison if found guilty.

– “Deeply disturbing” –

Criticism has come from Western nations who have accused China of eviscerating the freedoms it once promised Hong Kong.

The United States, which has previously sanctioned key Chinese officials for the ongoing crackdown, called on Beijing to “stop targeting Hong Kong defenders”.

Canadian Foreign Minister Mélanie Joly called the arrests “deeply disturbing”.

Ho, a popular Hong Kong singer and LGBTQ activist, is also a Canadian national.

EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said he was following the arrests with “great concern”, while Human Rights Watch called them a “shocking new low for Hong Kong”.

“Even by Hong Kong’s recent standards of escalating repression, these arrests represent a shocking escalation,” Amnesty International added.

The Vatican said it was concerned about Zen’s arrest and “was following developments very closely.”

– ‘sword of Damocles’ –

Cardinal Zen fled Shanghai for Hong Kong after the Communists took over China in 1949 and became the city’s bishop.

A longtime advocate of Hong Kong’s democracy movement, he accused the Vatican of “selling out” China’s underground Catholic Church by reaching a compromise with Beijing over the appointment of bishops on the mainland.

Hong Kong’s Catholic hierarchy, including successors to Zen, have become much less outspoken about Beijing in recent years.

The Hong Kong diocese said on Thursday it was “extremely concerned about the condition and safety of Cardinal Joseph Zen”.

“We hope that in the future we will continue to enjoy religious freedom in Hong Kong under the Basic Law,” he said in a statement, referring to the city’s mini-constitution which is supposed to guarantee essential freedoms.

Zen’s arrest sent shock waves through the city’s Catholic community.

“Cardinal Zen’s arrest is a blow to the whole Church in Hong Kong, China and the world,” Hong Kong-based Italian missionary Franco Mella, 73, told AFP.

“It has become apparent that there is a sword of Damocles above Zen and other members of the church.”

On Thursday, a church visitor who gave her name to Laura said worshipers feared the mainland-style suppression of religion was coming to Hong Kong.

“The space for religious freedom has apparently shrunk because even a Catholic cardinal is now under arrest,” she said.

Ta Kung Pao, a nationalist newspaper that reports to Beijing’s Hong Kong Liaison Office, published an article on Thursday accusing those arrested of “six crimes”.

Among other things, they funded lobbying trips and activist meetings with British lawmakers, provided financial aid to Hong Kong “rioters” who had fled to Canada and Taiwan, and accepted donations from abroad and from the newspaper. Apple Daily, now closed.

But most of the alleged actions cited by Ta Kung Pao took place before the enactment of the law, which is not meant to be retroactive.

The fund was dissolved last year after the National Security Police demanded that it hand over operational details, including information about its donors and beneficiaries.

(Except for the title, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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CCCG congratulates Tocqueville Fellows graduates | News | Department of Political Science https://helviti.com/cccg-congratulates-tocqueville-fellows-graduates-news-department-of-political-science/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:59:11 +0000 https://helviti.com/cccg-congratulates-tocqueville-fellows-graduates-news-department-of-political-science/ The Center for Citizenship and Constitutional Government (CCCG) congratulates nine Menard Tocqueville Family Scholars on their upcoming graduation from the University of Notre Dame. The Menard Family Tocqueville Fellowship Program is a competitive undergraduate scholarship designed to provide students with the opportunity to discuss fundamental issues of politics, culture, business, markets, philosophy, and religion. Fellows […]]]>

The Center for Citizenship and Constitutional Government (CCCG) congratulates nine Menard Tocqueville Family Scholars on their upcoming graduation from the University of Notre Dame. The Menard Family Tocqueville Fellowship Program is a competitive undergraduate scholarship designed to provide students with the opportunity to discuss fundamental issues of politics, culture, business, markets, philosophy, and religion. Fellows participate in colloquia, attend conferences organized by the CCCG and often have the opportunity to meet privately with guest speakers and personalities from political and public life.

The CCCG would like to thank these nine graduates who have actively contributed to the life of the center through the Tocqueville Scholarship.

Patrick Aimone will graduate with a major in political science and minors in constitutional studies, philosophy, politics, and economics, the Hesburgh Program in Public Service, and the Glynn Family Honors Program. He has been a Tocqueville scholarship holder for six semesters. “The possibility and importance of deep intellectual friendships with people you disagree with, but can learn from” was the most important lesson he learned through the scholarship. Patrick will enroll at Harvard Law School in 2024 after being accepted into the Junior Deferral Program.

John Burque will graduate with a major in the Liberal Studies and Economics program with a minor in Classical Civilization. He was a Tocqueville Scholar for three semesters and is grateful for the scholarship’s emphasis on thoughtful discussion.

“Tocqueville taught me to think about political issues at a higher level. It taught me to listen to disagreements, deal with both sides of an argument, and come to my own conclusions, not ideologically, but always principled. I hope to keep that skill with me for the rest of my life,” John said.

After graduating, John will begin working as a government affairs officer at the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty in Washington, DC.

Zef Crnkovich will graduate with a major in Classics and a minor in Constitutional Studies. He was a Tocqueville Scholar for two semesters and enjoyed the opportunities to meet and learn from other students who have different beliefs. Zef will work for a hedge fund after graduation.

Sam Delmer majoring in philosophy and economics with minors in constitutional studies and theology. He will enroll at Harvard Law School in the fall.

Veronique Maska will graduate with a major in business analysis and minors in constitutional studies and philosophy. She was a Tocqueville Scholar for six semesters and said she came to appreciate how each level of government reflects an underlying philosophy. After graduation, Veronica will begin employment in government consulting providing legal analysis for federal agencies in Washington, D.C.

Marie Frances Myler will graduate with a major in the Liberal Studies program and minors in Constitutional Studies and Theology. She joined the Tocqueville Scholars for the last semester of her senior year and enjoyed the opportunities for thoughtful discussion and intellectual community offered by the fellowship. After graduating, Mary Frances will participate in the 2022 Claremont Institute Publius Fellowship before returning to the Center for Citizenship and Constitutional Government for a postgraduate fellowship.

Lizzie Self will graduate with a major in the Liberal Studies and Theology program and a minor in Constitutional Studies. She was a Tocquevillle Fellow for four semesters. After graduating, Lizzie will spend her summer in Denver, CO teaching with Breakthrough Collaborative before living overseas as a programming and operations intern with Beatitudes Missions.

Sean Tehan will graduate with a major in political science and minors in constitutional studies and theology. He was a Toqueville Scholar for five semesters and enjoyed how the scholarship encourages intellectual humility and the lifelong pursuit of knowledge. After graduating, Sean will enroll in Notre Dame Law School.

Zach Thapar will graduate with a major in Political Science and Global Affairs (concentration in International Development Studies). He has been a Tocqueville scholarship holder for seven semesters.

“Tocqueville taught me to think critically about pressing issues in the political sphere, including religious freedom, big tech censorship, and judicial philosophy,” he said.

Zach will begin a Senate leadership position in Washington, D.C. through the Public Interest Fellowship upon graduation.

The CCCG will continue to accept applications for the Menard Family Tocqueville Fellowship Program until May 13. All undergraduate students at the University of Notre Dame, St. Mary’s College and Holy Cross College are eligible for to apply.

Originally posted by Center for Citizenship and Constitutional Government to constudies.nd.edu on May 10, 2022.

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Faculty Council discusses plans for Fall 2022 and awards degrees https://helviti.com/faculty-council-discusses-plans-for-fall-2022-and-awards-degrees/ Thu, 05 May 2022 03:28:39 +0000 https://helviti.com/faculty-council-discusses-plans-for-fall-2022-and-awards-degrees/ Ithaca College’s faculty council met May 3 for its final meeting of spring 2022 to discuss employee benefits, elect the executive committee for the 2022-23 academic year, award degrees, and meet with the President La Jerne Cornish. Board members were able to share their concerns and questions about the changes to their dental plan that […]]]>

Ithaca College’s faculty council met May 3 for its final meeting of spring 2022 to discuss employee benefits, elect the executive committee for the 2022-23 academic year, award degrees, and meet with the President La Jerne Cornish.

Board members were able to share their concerns and questions about the changes to their dental plan that were enacted this year, elected the executive committee and held an executive session of approximately one hour. Members of the 2021-2022 and 2022-2023 faculty council were present at the meeting.

Reduction of benefits

Hayley Harris, vice president of the Office of Human Resources and Planning, outlined changes to the college’s dental plan for 2022, which only impacted out-of-network services.

Faculty members who are eligible for benefit coverage include hourly employees who work at least 1,000 hours per fiscal year, salaried staff who are not temporary and who work at least 50% of the time during the fiscal year, and professors who teach at least 14 credit hours per academic year.

The college’s Faculty and Staff Benefits Committee (FSBC), the Harris Benefits Team, and partners such as Etnaa managed healthcare company, and the National Corporation of Financial Partnersan insurance company, consult with the Office of Human Resources on decisions regarding benefits.

the FSBC consists of 12 members of the campus community who have been appointed by the faculty and staff council. Harris said the FSBC meets monthly, but Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, a professor in the Department of Politics, said he’s heard the committee may not meet as often.

“I met a faculty member a few weeks ago who said she was on the committee, and they hadn’t met in a while,” Soyinka-Airewele said.

Harris said in late spring 2021, his team and partners recommended the college cut some coverage for in-network dentists by 10%. Harris’ slide showed that type A off-grid coverage — preventive services such as cleanings and X-rays — has been reduced from 100% to 90%. Type B off-grid coverage — basic services such as deposits and emergency care for dental pain — has been reduced from 80% to 70%. The college also changed the amount it reimbursed employees for out-of-network services to align with the amount it reimbursed for in-network services, resulting in participants seeing a significant change in their reimbursements. .

Harris said while salary makes up the largest portion of the Office of Human Resources budget — at 50% — faculty benefits are second at 15%.

In an email sent to faculty and college staff on March 25 which was obtained by Ithaca, Harris said the previous dental benefit structure was not a good use of college resources.

“Under our previous structure, a dentist could have hypothetically charged $500 for a basic cleaning and the college would still have authorized 85% of that charge — $425 — and reimbursed that 100%,” Harris said in the e- mail.

According to Harris’ presentation, components of the benefits budget include $12.5 million for medical plans; $1.2 million for dental, vision, life, accident and long-term disability insurance; $5 million for the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association; $3 million for tuition rebate; and the rest includes benefits like flu shots, unemployment, and workers’ compensation.

“When these recommendations were presented, they seemed entirely reasonable,” Harris said. “We make a lot of decisions every day. It wasn’t something that I thought, at the time, that we needed to look at in general, because 10% is 10%.”

Harris said after making the changes to the dental plan, she learned that reimbursement amounts for out-of-network services matched reimbursements for in-network services. She said what out-of-network dentists charge matters.

“Knowing that, we would have done [dental plan changes] differently, communicated differently, of course,” Harris said. “But that was a year ago and we were making decisions based on the information we had at the time.”

Charis Dimaras, a professor in the Department of Music Performance, said it’s hard for the college to run smoothly on a day-to-day basis if professors are sick with dental issues because they haven’t been able to get the care they need. need.

“If you’re sick, or if you’re reeling, or if you can’t eat and if you can’t teach, then I don’t think you’re very worried about what will happen when you retire in 30 years. “, said Dimaras.

Motion to confer degrees

Faculty Council President Chris McNamara offered to confer degrees, with the college’s legal act officially awarding their degrees to students.

“Faculty Council recommends to the Board of Trustees that all students who have completed their respective degree requirements, as certified by the records of the Registrar’s Office, be awarded the appropriate degree at the beginning of this year and at each of the other approved degrees and graduation dates over the coming year,” McNamara said.

Beginning will be held in two sessions at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on May 22 in the Glazer Arena at the Athletics and Events Center and virtually via live stream.

Executive Committee for the 2022-2023 academic year

The members of the faculty council for the academic year 2022-2023 have elected their executive committee. Ellen Staurowsky, a professor in the Department of Arts, Science and Media Studies, was elected chair; Dimaras as vice-president; Rebecca Lesses, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion and coordinator of Jewish studies, was elected secretary; Chrystyna Dail, associate professor in the Department of Theater Arts, was elected as the APC representative; and the two at-large representatives are Laura Kuo, Health Sciences Librarian, and Susan Salahshor, Assistant Professor and Physician Assistant Program Director.

“I’m encouraged that next year’s Council will take us forward and my greatest wish is that you can meet in person,” McNamara said. “And really, that will mean a big positive on so many fronts, that we will be a healthier community.”

Faculty Council also met with La Jerne Cornish for about an hour in a closed session that Ithaca was not allowed to attend.

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Utah Episcopalians choose new bishop, second woman to lead them https://helviti.com/utah-episcopalians-choose-new-bishop-second-woman-to-lead-them/ Tue, 03 May 2022 12:50:25 +0000 https://helviti.com/utah-episcopalians-choose-new-bishop-second-woman-to-lead-them/ Reverend Phyllis Spiegel, who is set to replace Bishop Scott Hayashi, is eager to “meet and converse” with Latter-day Saint authorities. (Photo courtesy) Reverend Phyllis Spiegel is set to become the 12th Episcopal Bishop of Utah and the second woman to lead the diocese. | May 3, 2022, 12:47 p.m. After more than a decade […]]]>

Reverend Phyllis Spiegel, who is set to replace Bishop Scott Hayashi, is eager to “meet and converse” with Latter-day Saint authorities.

(Photo courtesy) Reverend Phyllis Spiegel is set to become the 12th Episcopal Bishop of Utah and the second woman to lead the diocese.

After more than a decade under Bishop Scott Hayashi, Episcopalians in Utah have chosen a new top leader – the Reverend Phyllis Spiegel – as the 12th bishop and second woman to lead the oldest denomination. State Protestant.

Spiegel, born in southwest Virginia but having recently served in Ohio, was elected Saturday on the first ballot by a vote of clergy and lay representatives at St. Mark’s Cathedral in downtown Salt Lake City.

She is a vegetarian, single mother and nature lover, drawn to the beautiful landscape and religious diversity of Beehive State, according to her official biography.

“My childhood consisted of church, Girl Scouting, camping and hiking the Appalachian Trail,” Spiegel wrote in his introduction to the Diocese of Utah.

Building on his undergraduate work in business management, French and international studies at Emory & Henry College in Virginia, the future priest taught business and commerce at a secondary school in Kenya for nine months and then worked briefly for the Girl Scouts before opening a second location of her mother’s nature store, For the Birds.

Afterward, she wrote, “I have answered the call to the priesthood.

She enrolled in Virginia Theological Seminary in the fall of 2001 and since graduating has served in several churches in that state and Ohio.

“The Diocese of Utah is doing the work I am called to do and trained to do throughout my 17 years of ordained ministry, plus the previous 11 years as a professional naturalist,” wrote Spiegel in his statement to the church. “A bishop must articulate and lead the vision, but the diocese must have heart. God molds the same call in our hearts. … Embracing the incredible diversity of the people of Utah is an essential part of the missionary work your diocese seeks, and it engages my baptismal imagination.

With more than 4,000 members, the Diocese of Utah “has long been part of the Ute reservation at Whiterocks along with St. Elizabeth’s, which Spiegel visited this month,” Episcopal spokesman Craig Wirth said, and with “The Church of the Holy Spirit, which has been in the Randlett area for nearly 140 years.

The diocese also includes a large immigrant and refugee congregation at All Saints in Salt Lake City, Wirth said, and several Spanish-speaking congregations in Ogden and West Jordan.

The historic church has achieved ‘inclusive diversity,’ the spokesperson said, ‘through its longstanding support of an inclusive policy of personal gender identity, orientation, age and other considerations cultural and social activities among its members and its clergy”.

Spiegel is certainly aware of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints “and its dominance” in Utah, he said, “and appreciates the bridge-building ministry of the current bishop.” .

She looks forward, says Wirth, “to meeting and conversing” with leaders and Latter-day Saints.

As for those of the diocese who elected her, they are delighted.

“We are delighted to welcome Reverend Phyllis Spiegel as bishop-elect,” said Reverend Holly Huff, Associate Priest at St. Mark’s Cathedral. “While I have great respect and gratitude for each of the nominees, I was ultimately drawn to Reverend Spiegel’s enthusiastic and dynamic presence and her clear desire to form disciples of Jesus. She’s a prayerful person, an engaging preacher (even on Zoom; no small feat!), and someone I’m delighted to work with and learn from.

The “trick is to call a bishop with strong communication and administrative skills who is able to speak and manage from a place of deep attentiveness to the Holy Spirit,” Huff added, “and that combination is what I was drawn to by Reverend Spiegel.”

Spiegel will remain bishop-elect until she is endorsed by other dioceses and a number of bishops in the House of Bishops, Wirth said. After that, she is scheduled to be dedicated Sept. 17 during a special service at the Capitol Theater in downtown Salt Lake City.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Episcopal Bishop Scott Hayashi, shown in 2018, will continue to lead the diocese until his successor is installed in the fall.

She will succeed Hayashi, who is retiring after serving in the role since November 2010, but will remain as head of the state church until Spiegel is consecrated in the fall.

Spiegel is the second woman to lead the diocese. The first, Bishop Carolyn Tanner Irish, died in June aged 81.

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) Episcopal Bishop Carolyn Tanner Irish, shown in 2004, died in June 2021. She was the first woman to lead the Episcopal Diocese of Utah.

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Iftar in the house of Jesus https://helviti.com/iftar-in-the-house-of-jesus/ Sun, 01 May 2022 13:20:56 +0000 https://helviti.com/iftar-in-the-house-of-jesus/ A church in Nashik, Maharashtra, held a multi-faith iftar celebration to spread a strong message of brotherhood and communal harmony. Namaz was offered in the church and its resident priest prayed alongside the Muslims. At Holy Cross Church in the heart of the city, heads of various religious institutions had gathered to reflect on political […]]]>

A church in Nashik, Maharashtra, held a multi-faith iftar celebration to spread a strong message of brotherhood and communal harmony. Namaz was offered in the church and its resident priest prayed alongside the Muslims.

At Holy Cross Church in the heart of the city, heads of various religious institutions had gathered to reflect on political party interference in religion and some political parties becoming film promoters – an obvious reference to men of the BJP who were asked to put up posters of The Kashmir Files on the walls and urging people to watch the film.

Father Vency D’Mello said: “There were priests of all religions gathered in the church, sharing food and thoughts together. We were so engrossed in our discussions of brotherhood and harmony that we simply forgot about the passing of time. Soon it was almost dusk and when our Muslim brothers said they had to leave to offer prayers and break their fast, I just offered the church for namaz as it is also a place of God and n Any prayer can be said here. Then we all prayed together.

Islamic scholar Maulana Zahur Ahmad, who was present on the occasion, welcomed the gesture. “We are very humbled. I will pass on the message but I think such events should be held frequently and not just during Ramzan to strengthen the bonds we all share as Indians.”

Kiran Mohite of Bharatiya Hitrakshak Sabha and Ajmal Khan of the Aim Charitable Trust, two NGOs with no political affiliation, were the main instigators of the cross-party interaction. Mohite strongly believes in the diversity of India. “We are known as a place where all religions have flourished and where people have lived together for centuries,” he says, determined that this unity in diversity will not be destroyed.

On the other hand, Ajmal Khan said proudly, “After this program, I am sure that if at any time I become the target of someone, there will be at least 10 people who will support me and they will not be not just Muslims, but people of all faiths.”

There was a consensus at the meeting – TV news channels amplify the hate and paint an unreal picture of India. “The reality is different from what we see on television. The media is under the control of the ruling party which uses “saam, daam, dand and bhed” to keep them under control. In reality, people who believe in the idea of ​​India are always together and share their happy and difficult times together,” was the common perception.

As veteran journalist Niranjan Takle said, “Hate has an expiration date, love is timeless. The people will win and triumph.”

When people like Mohite, D’Mello, Khan, Bhante Aryanath (Buddhist), Chetna Chordia (Jain), Shabbir Burhani (Bohra) Sachin Joshi and Swapnil Ghiya (Hindus) and others like them present at the meeting say they cherish the freedom, equality and fraternity and will always fight for the idea of ​​India, “where unity is in diversity and not in uniformity”, there is still hope for the nation.

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What the 2022 General Assembly session means for educators https://helviti.com/what-the-2022-general-assembly-session-means-for-educators/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 20:31:57 +0000 https://helviti.com/what-the-2022-general-assembly-session-means-for-educators/ Read more about ESP bonus legislation here. This session of the General Assembly continued the work of short- and long-term recovery from the pandemic and reinvigorated support for schools, students, and educators, driven by Maryland’s Blueprint for the Future and its promise to improved staffing, salaries, emphasis on recruitment and retention of all educators, and […]]]>

Read more about ESP bonus legislation here.

This session of the General Assembly continued the work of short- and long-term recovery from the pandemic and reinvigorated support for schools, students, and educators, driven by Maryland’s Blueprint for the Future and its promise to improved staffing, salaries, emphasis on recruitment and retention of all educators, and expanded student programs.

MSEA members and lobbyists worked hard throughout the session to make progress on several fronts, including holding Governor Hogan under fire to legally and fully fund public education, winning a victory over discrimination, advocate for honest and accurate education, and shine a light on workload issues faced by all educators, from instructors and paraeducators to school counsellors, maintenance staff and bus drivers.

The budget

During this legislative session, students, schools and educators were the victims of a mad budget race that saw Governor Hogan reinstating $140 million in funding for the Blueprint for Maryland’s Future required by the law but absent from its initial proposed budget. The Governor’s failure in his final budget to fully fund the Blueprint was a demonstration of his continued refusal, despite a historic billion-dollar surplus, to give all students the opportunity to pursue their dreams by funding high-quality public education. quality.

Despite this, and thanks to the work of legislators and a huge budget surplus, $800 million was budgeted this session to fund the critical years of the Master Plan, including the promised increase in staff, salaries, community schools, student supports and vocational and technical education. expansion. Other Blueprint-related programs included in the final budget include:

  • $8.4 million for leadership training, model state curriculum and instructional materials, and college and career readiness program study
  • $2.9 million for teacher training for National Board certification
  • $2 million for behavioral health training for teachers and expert teams

This is a great victory for students, schools, educators and communities who can witness the transformational change that MSEA members and education champions have long been fighting for. “We kicked things off with internal studies on critical issues and the fight for the casino’s long-pledged education funds. We continued with the March for our schools and participated in the Kirwan Commission. Steadfast determination has gotten us to this tipping point,” said MSEA President Cheryl Bost. “Now is the time to focus on implementing the Blueprint’s groundbreaking policies and programs in every school district so that students of all races, backgrounds, and zip codes have a great public school in their neighborhood.” Learn more about the Blueprint and what it means for you and your students here.

Fight for a balanced workload

While class sizes, workloads, and staffing ratios were unmanageable before the pandemic, they reached crisis levels in the wake of the pandemic. Educators know that class sizes are the root of difficult working conditions that drive educators out of the profession and prevent students from receiving the individual and small group instruction and services they need. The MSEA has received hundreds of comments from members about their unsustainable class sizes and the difficulty of reaching every student, grading every paper, as well as the overcrowding and workload issues they face every day.

The ability to negotiate class sizes at the bargaining table would be a student-focused improvement – reasonable class sizes mean more and better teaching and learning, and space and time for learning. small group instruction that we know is essential for so many students. But bargaining over class sizes is currently an illegal bargaining topic in Maryland, one of nine states where it is.

Efforts by MSEA members to win the right to negotiate class sizes have failed this year, but the learning curve for lawmakers has been steep. As we mount an ongoing campaign into the next year, we will continue to educate lawmakers and build on this year’s advocacy to bring this bill closer to the finish line, and eventually cross it.

Anti-discrimination and honest education

Finally, reason and humanity prevail in successfully passed legislation that prohibits local school boards, public K-12 schools, and private K-12 schools that receive funding from the state to deny enrollment, expel, deny privileges, or otherwise discriminate against a student based on race, ethnicity, color, religion, sex, age , national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability. It also protects a student, or a student’s parent or guardian, from retaliation for a complaint of discrimination.

The MSEA has addressed this issue of fairness and equity for many years. For too long, Maryland taxpayers, through the governor’s annual budget, have funded private schools with discriminatory practices while public schools suffered from broken air conditioners, leaky roofs, outdated textbooks, and more.

“There is no place for discriminatory practices in schools that accept public funding. Now, like all public schools, private schools that receive public funds must be held accountable for their policies and practices regarding who they admit, how they discipline, and so on. said Cheryl Bost, president of the MSEA. “Districts and private schools should post an anti-discrimination statement in their student handbook and provide all students with clear behavioral expectations and the protections they are rightfully owed.”

MSEA believes in honest and fair education, which means acknowledging the racially motivated dog whistles and threats of misinformation campaigns that pit parents against educators. The General Assembly has strongly resisted several bills designed for this purpose. “It’s about distraction and exclusion,” Bost said.

“Some politicians and groups use this strategy to create division and chaos. We are proud of legislators who have championed public education and the right of every child to an honest and accurate education from qualified, educated professionals.

“We have the opportunity of a lifetime thanks to the Blueprint’s focus on equity in education. MSEA will always champion an education that respects, reflects and supports children of all races, genders, sexual orientations, backgrounds and backgrounds.

Virtual Education

The MSEA has closely monitored bills addressing virtual learning and worked closely with lawmakers and advocates to pass bills that develop specific safeguards to support equity and ensure education high quality virtual. The Virtual Education Legislation establishes guidelines for the development and operation of virtual schools, requires the MSDE to advise on virtual learning best practices, and addresses procedures for in-person schools using virtual learning due to weather or emergency.

Highlights of the bill include that all virtual educators must be public school employees, that educators cannot be required to simultaneously teach students in person and online, and that students have access to services extracurricular and enveloping. The legislation also aims to ensure that staff and students have access to required technology and that the student body of virtual schools reflects the diversity of the county.

This is just the beginning of the work to ensure that students receive the education they are entitled to when virtual options are used. The MSEA will urge Governor Hogan to enact this law and monitor its implementation to determine if further improvements need to be made.

Staff shortages open the door to retirees

To help address crippling staffing shortages, we also successfully passed a bill that exempts a re-employed retired educator from the usual compensation cap, providing incentives to fill vacancies with experienced educators. This legislation applies to reuse occurring from July 1, 2022 to June 30, 2024.

Cancel your union dues!

Finally, union members like you should be aware that a bill was also passed this session to allow union dues up to $300 to be counted as a future income tax subtraction amendment.

“We’ve made great strides this session, and we’ll continue to build on that in the future — hopefully that’s with a strong, collaborative ally in the Governor’s mansion,” Bost said. “With our strong voice, we can offer the support, relief and resources that all of our students, educators and communities deserve.”

Latest news

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Survivors unite to deliver message on Holocaust remembrance https://helviti.com/survivors-unite-to-deliver-message-on-holocaust-remembrance/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 04:36:04 +0000 https://helviti.com/survivors-unite-to-deliver-message-on-holocaust-remembrance/ NEW YORK (AP) — Holocaust survivors around the world have united to deliver a message about the dangers of unchecked hatred and the importance of remembrance at a time of rising global anti-Semitism. In a video posted Thursday To mark Yom HaShoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day in Israel – 100 Holocaust survivors asked people to […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) — Holocaust survivors around the world have united to deliver a message about the dangers of unchecked hatred and the importance of remembrance at a time of rising global anti-Semitism.

In a video posted Thursday To mark Yom HaShoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day in Israel – 100 Holocaust survivors asked people to stand with them and remember the Nazi genocide to avoid repeating the horrors of the past.

The 100 Words project video was released by the New York-based Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, also known as the Claims Conference. The group represents World Jewry in negotiating compensation and restitution for victims of Nazi persecution and their heirs, and provides social assistance to Holocaust survivors worldwide.

“The world is full of conflict – from the pandemic to the crisis in Ukraine – on days of remembrance like Yom HaShoah, it’s so important to stop and reflect,” said Gideon Taylor, president of the Claims Conference. , in a press release.

“The call to action that these survivors made today is not just a call to remembrance, but a call to action, a reminder that we don’t have to be spectators. We can all fight back in our own way and we can choose not to let our collective history repeat itself. »

Draft comes as Russia faces widespread revulsion and war crimes charges for attacks on civilians in his invasion of Ukraine. It also comes at a time when Holocaust survivors – now in their 80s and 90s – are dying, while studies show younger generations lack even basic knowledge of the Nazi genocide, in which a third of World Jews were wiped out.

“If we don’t remember them, we murder them twice because we forgot them. And we forgot the tragic travesty that was inflicted on millions of people,” said Ginger Lane, a Holocaust survivor who, along with her siblings, was hidden in an orchard near Berlin by non- jews.

“It’s important to remember that because it’s part of our heritage and our legacy that we pass on to the younger generation,” said Lane, whose mother was killed at the Auschwitz death camp, and who has made it his mission to educate. others.

“Holocaust denial, we know it’s always been there, but it seems to be on the rise and…a lot of young people don’t even know what the word Holocaust means…These young people are impatient to move on with their lives. But their lives today are shaped by the past. And they need to know what happened in the past.

In a study of 50 states of millennials and Gen Z in the United States in 2020, researchers found that 63% of respondents did not know that 6 million Jews were killed in the Holocaust and 48% could not name a single Jewish camp. death or concentration.

The 100-word project statement by Holocaust survivors says:

“Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day.

We all survived the Holocaust

We are here to give voice to the six million Jews who were murdered

We are a reminder that unchecked hate can lead to actions, actions to genocide

Just over 75 years ago, a third of the world’s Jews were systematically murdered

Among them, more than 1.5 million children were killed

in the name of indifference, intolerance, hatred

Hate for what we feared

Hate for what was different

We must remember the past or it will become our future

On Holocaust Remembrance Day, we ask the world to stand with us and remember.

The annual remembrance known as Yom HaShoah is one of the most solemn on the Israeli calendar, with the nation coming to a standstill for a two-minute siren on Thursday morning. According to the Hebrew calendar, Holocaust Remembrance Day marks the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising in 1943 – the most significant act of Jewish resistance during the Holocaust. Although the uprising ultimately failed, he is remembered in Israel as a symbol of strength and the struggle for freedom in the face of annihilation.

It means “resilience, tenacity, strength. It’s the mark of being a Holocaust survivor, the very concept of survival, of day-to-day problems, of fighting until the end,” said Greg Schneider, executive vice president of the Claims Conference.

“And for some, unfortunately, the end was the gas chamber. For others, the end was the Warsaw ghetto, where a very small group of ill-equipped people held out for nearly a month,” Schneider said.

“And that’s why it’s such an important day in Israel, and around the world for the Jewish community because it symbolizes the struggle of the Jewish people, yes, but of all people facing this kind of incredible adversity.”

The Claims Conference is working with its partners, including the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, or JDC, to get as many Holocaust survivors out of Ukraine as possible. Thousands of people have been killed and more than five million have fled Ukraine since the beginning of the Russian invasion on February 24.

Holocaust survivors from Canada, England, France, Germany, Israel, the United States and Ukraine were part of the video statement.

“Survivors from many different countries and languages ​​who have very different experiences of persecution – some were in concentration camps, some were in ghettos, some fled, some were in hiding,” Schneider said.

“And yet they come together to speak with one voice of hope for the future.”

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Associated Press religious coverage receives support through the AP’s collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content.

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