Religion christian – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 09:16:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Religion christian – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 Pakistan, EU reaffirm determination to protect religious freedom https://helviti.com/pakistan-eu-reaffirm-determination-to-protect-religious-freedom/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 08:46:14 +0000 https://helviti.com/pakistan-eu-reaffirm-determination-to-protect-religious-freedom/ ISLAMABAD: Pakistan and the European Union (EU) on Wednesday reaffirmed their determination to protect human rights as well as fundamental freedoms, with an emphasis on freedom of religion, religious tolerance and peaceful coexistence, and minority rights. The agreement was reached during a meeting between Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi and High Representative for Foreign Affairs […]]]>

ISLAMABAD:

Pakistan and the European Union (EU) on Wednesday reaffirmed their determination to protect human rights as well as fundamental freedoms, with an emphasis on freedom of religion, religious tolerance and peaceful coexistence, and minority rights.

The agreement was reached during a meeting between Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi and High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Vice-President of the European Commission (HR / VP) Josep Borrell during the 6th Round of the Strategic Dialogue European Union-Pakistan, said a statement released after the meeting.

During the meeting, FM Qureshi expressed his concerns over the growing trends of Islamophobic acts, xenophobia and religious intolerance around the world and the need for a joint resolution to counter them.

The EU official, on the other hand, raised concerns over the death penalty and the abuse of Pakistani blasphemy laws following the lynching of a Sri Lankan national in Sialkot on charges of crimes. allegations of blasphemy.

However, Borrell praised Pakistan for passing the Protection of Journalists and Media Professionals Bill and hoped that the Anti-Torture Bill and other human rights related laws would be passed soon. .

SPG-Plus Status

Qureshi and Borrell also expressed a strong political commitment to the GSP + and the implementation of 27 international conventions on human rights, labor rights, environmental protection and good governance that are linked to the treaty. commercial.

In addition, Qureshi and Borrell reviewed the ongoing cooperation between Pakistan and the EU on the basis of the Strategic Engagement Plan.

Read Peshawar judge orders blasphemy investigation against organizers of Women’s Day march

“They agreed to further strengthen the EU-Pakistan mutual engagement, in particular on regional security and cooperation,” the statement said, adding that they also agreed to hold the first meeting of the “new EU-security dialogue. Pakistan with sub-groups on non-proliferation and disarmament, and counter-terrorism in 2022 ”, indicates the press release from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The EU official also welcomed the progress made by Pakistan in implementing the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) action plans to move out of the gray list and the ongoing efforts to achieve well the remaining actions.

The representative of the EU welcomed the continued cooperation with Pakistan on electoral issues. “High Representative Borrell briefed Foreign Minister Qureshi on the upcoming monitoring visit of the EU Election Observation Mission to Pakistan in 2018,” the statement said.

Climate change

During the meeting, issues related to climate change and the importance of global action to counter the threat were also discussed.

The two envoys also discussed the importance for developed countries to take the lead in mobilizing climate finance, noting the important role of public and private funds, and technology in facilitating the transition.

According to the statement, Borrell welcomed Pakistan’s statement ahead of the Glasgow conference of its nationally determined contribution to achieving common climate goals.

Afghanistan

The envoys from Pakistan and the EU agreed on the importance of maintaining a sustained engagement with Afghanistan to promote stability and combat narcotics as well as the threat of terrorism.

“They expressed deep concern at the potential for an economic collapse and a significant worsening of the humanitarian crisis and a new influx of refugees,” the statement said, adding that Afghanistan’s serious liquidity problems strained legitimate banking services.

“They also agreed on the need to continue providing urgent and unhindered humanitarian aid and basic social service support to the Afghan people,” he added.

Read more EU welcomes Pakistan’s progress on GSP-related conventions

The envoys stressed the importance “of improving the socio-economic situation and preserving human rights, especially those of women and girls, and persons belonging to minorities,” the statement added.

The envoys from Pakistan and the EU supported the dialogue between the Afghan parties to achieve national reconciliation and stressed the importance of an inclusive and representative government, to improve the prospects for security and stability.

The representative of the EU thanked Pakistan for its support in the evacuation of EU nationals and the safe passage of people from Afghanistan.

Qureshi expressed Pakistan’s support for the inclusion of the EU in the regional political consultation mechanism on Afghanistan.

Rights violations in Kashmir

During the meeting, Qureshi reiterated Pakistan’s deep concerns over human rights violations by India in occupied Kashmir, and efforts to change the demographics of the disputed territory in violation of UNSC resolutions.

Borrell stressed that the EU is closely monitoring the human rights situation in Jammu and Kashmir. He reiterated the need to show restraint, defuse tensions and resolve the dispute through dialogue and constructive political and diplomatic engagement.

The EU envoy welcomed the February 2021 agreement between India and Pakistan for the observance of the ceasefire agreement on the line of control in Jammu and Kashmir and to engage through established mechanisms.


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Spirituality discourages distinction of humans on the basis of religion: Justice Mithal https://helviti.com/spirituality-discourages-distinction-of-humans-on-the-basis-of-religion-justice-mithal/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 16:57:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/spirituality-discourages-distinction-of-humans-on-the-basis-of-religion-justice-mithal/ The Chief Justice of the High Court of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh, Pankaj Mithal, said on Sunday that India has the distinction of being known as the “spiritual capital” of the world. “The cultural milieu of India is the cosmos of pure spirituality, which discourages any distinction between humans on the basis of religion,” […]]]>

The Chief Justice of the High Court of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh, Pankaj Mithal, said on Sunday that India has the distinction of being known as the “spiritual capital” of the world.

“The cultural milieu of India is the cosmos of pure spirituality, which discourages any distinction between humans on the basis of religion,” he said.

Judge Mithal made the remark during an event on “Dharma and the Constitution of India” organized by the Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh branch of the Delhi-based organization Adhivakta Parishad to commemorate the 72nd day of the Constitution.

Attorney General DC Raina, the Additional High Court Advocate General and dozens of attorneys and legal luminaries also attended the ceremony.

In his opening speech, Judge Mithal said: “Our effort should be to exercise the fundamental duties instead of just asking for the rights. “” Religion is synonymous with righteousness and every religion leads to moral conduct in life. he said, adding that religious scriptures serve as a guiding principle for discerning right from wrong.

Justice Mithal said laws should be framed around the needs of society, not after admiring the West.

He said that the Vedas are the law of nature and it is morality and good conduct that makes a person religious.

Judge Mithal said that the Mahabharat and Gautam Buddha’s principle of ‘ahimsa’ (non-violence) convince people to embrace the highest articles of faith and virtue.

He said that from time immemorial, under every rule, the Indian people have upheld the sacred beliefs of spirituality without interfering in the personal articles of faith of others.

He stated that this secularism has been continuously carried to this day by the nation in its true spirit although the word “secular” was added to the Constitution later through an amendment.

The attorney general said that religion was not ruled out by the Constitution, but rather preserved its exercise by people of all sects.

“Articles 14, 19, 21, 25 to 29 give us an overview of the religious guarantees in our Constitution,” he said, adding that India has the most flexible Constitution which has preserved the sensitivities of all its citizens.

That is why the Constitution has been amended more than 100 times so far, he added.

The Advocate General said the Ayodhya verdict, the Shah Bano case, the ‘triple’ talaq and the Vaishno Devi temple issue are some of the vivid examples where the Constitution has shown the way to solutions. respectable.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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Can two young Orthodox Jewish players juggle professional baseball and religion? | Baseball https://helviti.com/can-two-young-orthodox-jewish-players-juggle-professional-baseball-and-religion-baseball/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 10:02:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/can-two-young-orthodox-jewish-players-juggle-professional-baseball-and-religion-baseball/ In the June 14, 1939 edition of the New York Post, Hy Turkin wrote about Morris Arnovich, the Philadelphia Phillies outfielder leading the National League with a batting average of .398. Morris was “full of excitement,” Turkin wrote, and a “safe bet” to make this season’s All-Star squad. Then, in the fifth paragraph, Turkin referred […]]]>

In the June 14, 1939 edition of the New York Post, Hy Turkin wrote about Morris Arnovich, the Philadelphia Phillies outfielder leading the National League with a batting average of .398. Morris was “full of excitement,” Turkin wrote, and a “safe bet” to make this season’s All-Star squad. Then, in the fifth paragraph, Turkin referred to Arnovich’s religion: “Jewish,” Turkin wrote, clearly. “Orthodox.”

Even though Arnovich, commonly referred to as the “Son of Israel” during his playing years, became less observant in his later years, as his family told The Guardian, he has long held a place in history as than the most religious Jewish major league.

That could change soon. In July, the Arizona Diamondbacks selected Jacob Steinmetz, a 6-foot-5 right-handed pitcher from Woodmere, New York, No. 77 in the MLB Draft. In the process, Steinmetz became the first known Orthodox Jew to be included in the MLB Draft since its inception in 1965. In the 20th round, the Washington Nationals drafted the wide receiver, a Las Vegas product and also an Orthodox Jew. .

The selections of Steinmetz and Kligman were cause for celebration in their community, but there is a reason for the lack of precedent. The Orthodox practice strict observance of Jewish law, normally defined as regular Torah study, adherence to a kosher diet, and observance of the Sabbath, which calls upon practitioners not to perform bedtime “work” from sun on Friday to sunset on Saturday. The demanding routine often pushes them to the outskirts of an increasingly secular nation.

“Juggling schoolwork, juggling being an Orthodox Jew, and spending the time it takes to level up, is something that most people either do not have the desire to do or do. will to do, ”says Jason Meyer, Steinmetz’s trainer at the Hebrew Academy of Five Towns & Rockaway. “Somehow Jacob and Elijah made it work.”

Jewish observance and baseball have clashed before, most notably in the case of Sandy Koufax, the Dodgers Hall of Fame pitcher who refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series because he fell on Yom Kippur. (His replacement, Don Drysdale, had a terrible game and told his manager, “I bet now you wish I was Jewish too” as he was taken off the field). Hank Greenberg, a Hall of Fame first baseman who played in the majors from 1930 to 1947, also refused to play on Yom Kippur. What sets Steinmetz and Kligman apart is their daily dedication to Jewish law (Koufax, Greenberg, and other less observant Jewish players have regularly competed on the Sabbath throughout their careers). Kligman, who honors his commitment to Wake Forest before going pro, won’t be playing on Sabbath during the season, but as a catcher he won’t be expected to play every day anyway. Steinmetz, who belongs to the more moderate modern Orthodox branch, will play on the Sabbath but plans to walk to the games rather than using transport, to avoid violating Jewish law.

The careers of Steinmetz and Kligman will function not only as case studies of the collision of religion and sport, but of what happens when the fundamentals of a young person’s life collide.

Players and their families believe they are equipped to navigate the road ahead. Steinmetz and Kligman are strengthened by their faith, as well as something Arnovitz did not have: a friend who understands.

“There is only [two people] on the planet right now who can share the same thoughts and feelings about everything, ”says Kligman’s father, Marc,“ and that’s Jacob and Elijah.


Steinmetz and Kligman grew up on both sides of the country, unaware of the other’s existence. As they worked to accomplish what had not been done before, they leaned on their families.

One summer evening in 2018, while out for a walk in the Arizona desert, Marc Kligman took a heart reading from his son.

Elie, an aspiring sophomore, had just turned heads once again at a tournament. Marc knew that the coaches of the college were going to start calling to question Elijah about his game but also about his observance of the Sabbath. Marc, a longtime MLB agent, had been told the ritual could hurt his son’s scholarship opportunities.

“Will you have the strength to keep Shabbos?” He asked. “People might say you shouldn’t be doing this. “

Elijah, his father recalls, was resolute. The Sabbath is all about honoring God, and as a practicing Jew this was his primary responsibility. Baseball would come in second. That won’t change in Wake Forest, or if it reaches the major leagues.

“It’s a holy day,” said Elijah simply.

No matter how accommodating the coaches are, from the youth league to high school – some postponed Friday night games and Saturday afternoon games to avoid Shabbat – Kligman missed many other contests. And scholarship offers too.

But his sacrifice also paid off. Last January, after Kligman was featured in an article for Chabad.org, his first nationwide exhibit, Marc’s phone started buzzing with calls and texts from Jews across the country. Some of the older readers, Marc said, told stories of their playing days and how they gave up gambling because they felt they couldn’t balance it with their religious commitments. And he heard from parents whose children now viewed Kligman as a hero. Kligman developed a friendly relationship with a boy named David, whose grandfather was an old friend of Marc, and sent David a signed photo.

“This thing took a life of its own,” says Marc. “It’s really about telling your story to people, where they just don’t have to put God on the back burner. You can be whoever you want to be.

Elie Kligman pledged to play college baseball in Wake Forest. Photography: Marc Kligman

As Kligman rose through the ranks, Steinmetz studied his own resume across the country. Juggling his faith and sporting dreams never seemed out of reach. In April 2014, his father, Elliot, took over the Yeshiva University men’s basketball team, leading the program to the NCAA Division III tournament. As Elliot scribbled games on the sidelines with a kippah on his head, he showed his son that sport and religion could mix.

This example propelled Steinmetz on a journey that reached new heights this spring. With the high school baseball season uncertain due to Covid-19, Steinmetz spent two months at Elev8 Baseball Academy in Delray Beach, Florida. It was there, according to Elev8 executive director and head coach Todd Moser, that Steinmetz put the finishing touches to his mechanics that propelled him to the third round of the draft. The professional scouts who came to the games were impressed.

“He’s done enough in front of the right people here,” Moser says. “He’s a guy of high character, and I think that has a lot to do with his faith.”

Steinmetz, like Kligman, plans to continue honoring his faith during his professional playing career, which began on September 13 when he pitched 1.1 innings for the Diamondbacks Rookie-league affiliate. The 18-year-old will maintain a kosher diet, keep his head covered and, where possible, find a quiet place to pray.


That the Steinmetz and Kligman increases occurred amid a surge in anti-Semitism in the United States – the Anti-Defamation League recorded 2,024 anti-Semitic incidents in 2020, the third highest rate since monitoring began in 1979 – is not lost on their community. For Steinmetz and Kligman, continued success is their response to hate.

“The best thing you can do to fight hate or anti-Semitism, or any other racial thing, is to continue to be a good example and do what you think is right,” Marc says. “I don’t think it has to do with standing on a soapbox and yelling at it. I think it’s more about action.

Steinmetz watched the MLB Draft from a house surrounded by friends, who erupted in joy at the call of his name. Kligman, meanwhile, was on a bus with Team Israel. – he was a training player for their tune-up games at the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics – when manager Nate Fish announced over the loudspeaker that he had been selected.

“We all went crazy and started cheering him on,” said Ian Kinsler, a four-time MLB All-Star who obtained Israeli citizenship in March 2020. “He was blushing a little. He had a beautiful smile.

Kinsler thinks the Steinmetz and Kligman stories deserve more attention, although he does admit it will be more likely to happen if they make the majors. The odds are not in their favor, even without considering how hindering their religious responsibilities can be: From 1981 to 2010, only 17.6% of players who were drafted and signed made it to the major leagues, according to Baseball America. .

Steinmetz and Kligman aren’t discouraged, in part because they know they won’t be alone. In December, after Steinmetz returns from a trip to Israel, they will meet in person for the first time after months of texting and Zoom calls. They will attend a Yeshiva University men’s basketball game and possibly sit down for Shabbat dinner.

“It’s good,” Kligman said, “to have a guy on the same path as me.”

Before they go their separate ways, Kligman hopes, they might even put on their gloves and throw a ball back and forth, and not just for themselves, but for those who came before them who quit the game, and for those who left them. who will follow. to play.


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Local leaders learn to deal with race conflicts, other issues | Connecticut News https://helviti.com/local-leaders-learn-to-deal-with-race-conflicts-other-issues-connecticut-news/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 23:47:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/local-leaders-learn-to-deal-with-race-conflicts-other-issues-connecticut-news/ By SUSAN HAIGH, Associated Press UNCASVILLE, Connecticut (AP) – In addition to preparing for snowstorms or the new school year, Connecticut city leaders were asked on Tuesday to prepare their communities for another kind of challenge: how to deal with race conflict , gender identity, religion and national origin. The lesson comes at a time […]]]>

By SUSAN HAIGH, Associated Press

UNCASVILLE, Connecticut (AP) – In addition to preparing for snowstorms or the new school year, Connecticut city leaders were asked on Tuesday to prepare their communities for another kind of challenge: how to deal with race conflict , gender identity, religion and national origin.

The lesson comes at a time when there have been an increase in hate crime incidents across the country and in Connecticut, conflicts over wearing masks and vaccine warrants, and pressure for greater racial fairness to the aftermath of George Floyd’s murder.

“Sometimes people don’t realize it, but many of the equity issues on the ground are also related to the functioning of municipal government and the functioning of local schools,” said Richard Porth, coordinator. special projects for the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities. “So there is a role in all of this. And I think that’s a significant role.

The JCC, which opened the first day of its convention and two-day exhibition on Tuesday, launched a series of public regional discussions last year on the long-standing issue of racial fairness following the murder of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis. This has led to the development of a “toolkit” for towns and villages to help them promote racial equity in their communities and other initiatives.

Political cartoons

The CCM, a private entity that represents the interests of municipalities, organizes monthly training sessions, periodic round tables and monthly actions for municipalities to meet.

On Tuesday, the CJC invited representatives from the Federal Service for Community Relations, a division of the US Department of Justice established in 1964 and known as “America’s Peacemaker,” to talk about their work. As impartial mediators, they work with community groups and help resolve conflicts and respond to allegations of hate crimes.

“There is no silver bullet that we can say to a community, ‘If you do this, you will resolve the conflict and eliminate the hate.’ That does not exist. I wish it were, but we can help you deal with it, ”said Michael David, conciliation specialist in the Community Relations Department. The organization offers a variety of programs, from helping communities come together after a deadly police shootout to helping citizens identify problems in their town, village or school and find solutions.

Some Connecticut communities are already doing some of this work on their own.

In Coventry, a predominantly white city of about 12,500 residents in eastern Connecticut, city council recently passed a resolution denouncing racism and acknowledging racial injustices past and present. The community is also planning “community conversations” about the race next year and to educate local residents on issues such as implicit and explicit biases.

“We just have to talk and feel comfortable talking with our neighbors,” said Annemarie Sundgren, the city’s social services administrator who is helping lead the initiative. She said the effort began after no students of color from the neighboring city of Hartford participated in the city’s school choice program this year. She said Coventry plans to survey local residents as well as residents of Hartford to find out more about their perceptions of the community.

Canton first coach Robert Bessel, who attended Tuesday’s presentation, said there had been no high-profile incidents of racial and ethical prejudice in his city, but he felt “he there was work to be done “in the community of approximately 10,200 people in Hartford County.

“There are some things we just need to talk about, to work on. How can we have more equity? How can we include more (people)? Said Bessel. He said that more confidence needs to be fostered in the city, as well as a “cultural shift” where people “stand up and say,” This is not happening here. “”

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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“A nation under one God” probably leaves out your religion https://helviti.com/a-nation-under-one-god-probably-leaves-out-your-religion/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 11:00:23 +0000 https://helviti.com/a-nation-under-one-god-probably-leaves-out-your-religion/ For the publisher: Former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn’s proposal to make America “a nation under God and a religion under God” is dangerous, delusional, divisive, and a distortion of history. (“No, Michael Flynn, America Doesn’t Need Just One Religion,” Opinion, November 20) Besides, what would this single religion be? Obviously, from Flynn’s point of […]]]>

For the publisher: Former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn’s proposal to make America “a nation under God and a religion under God” is dangerous, delusional, divisive, and a distortion of history. (“No, Michael Flynn, America Doesn’t Need Just One Religion,” Opinion, November 20)

Besides, what would this single religion be? Obviously, from Flynn’s point of view, it would not be Islam or any of the myriad religions considered “Eastern”. And, no matter when the term “Judeo-Christian” was coined, it does not describe a religion, but rather a supposedly shared ethical belief system.

So, does Flynn mean Catholicism or Judaism? My guess is no. Protestantism remains. But even this includes many distinct denominations whose adherents vehemently disagree on minor and major tenets of their beliefs.

Flynn blows a dog whistle, hoping that everyone who hears him will believe his religion will be the chosen one. Even my dog ​​knows better than to listen.

Andrew Rubin, Los Angeles

..

For the publisher: The vibrant religious culture we enjoy today as the most pious democracy in the West does not exist despite our secular tradition, but because of it. The tolerance, pluralism and free expression that we experience are only ensured by the freedom of conscience sanctioned by the state.

Flynn’s Christian nation argument is appealing. Many Americans would prefer an “established” state church and an implied covenant: If we revere God, He will protect and bless us.

But secularism has also added to our identity as a beacon of freedom. Without an age of reason, for example, the abolitionist movement would not have been able to decontextualize the implicit sanction of slavery and segregation in the Scriptures. The political emancipation of women would have been prevented, and marriage equality would be unthinkable.

Indeed, while the defenders of the Christian heritage see divine providence in the founding of the nation, the laity celebrate 1776 as the birth of a new type of high state, a society without a throne or an altar, where reason human is ascending. Reconciling these two impulses is a central challenge for our political system.

David DiLeo, San Clemente

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For the publisher: Flynn says America needs a God and a religion. Can I just say that if his brand of “religion” is what he promulgates, count me.

I could be wrong, but I have always lived under the concept that believers in God are moral, honest and honest persons. If anyone’s “lost sight of it,” it’s Flynn.

I repeat: count me.

Rebecca Hertsgaard, Palm Desert

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For the publisher: Randall Balmer, an episcopal priest, reminds us of earlier attempts to harness belief in God into some form of expression. President Lincoln and Mike Mansfield, Senate Majority Leader in the 1960s, helped thwart such attempts in their day.

I can’t help but remember Germany at a time when many of us were born – a time when a man hypnotized the nation against the Jews, who were murdered in unholy numbers.

God is too vast to be relegated to one religion. The 1st Amendment remains America’s best idea.

Mary Leah Plante, Los Angeles


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Religious traditions – Journal – DAWN.COM https://helviti.com/religious-traditions-journal-dawn-com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 02:42:17 +0000 https://helviti.com/religious-traditions-journal-dawn-com/ THIS article aims to create a deeper awareness of an inclusive view of divine leadership, often described as the transcendent unity of religions. I have covered this subject in detail in one of my recent articles, but this time I want to reflect on how the Holy Quran deals with the multiplicity of religious traditions. […]]]>

THIS article aims to create a deeper awareness of an inclusive view of divine leadership, often described as the transcendent unity of religions. I have covered this subject in detail in one of my recent articles, but this time I want to reflect on how the Holy Quran deals with the multiplicity of religious traditions. I invite readers to reflect on the selected verses with an open mind as it is a road less traveled, but definitely worth taking.

An almost universal statement in the Qur’an is that God sent many inspired prophets, messengers, and sages – with or without divine books – to the nations and communities of the past. The principle of pluralism both in time and in space is extended, asserting that every “ummah” or “milla” has a direction and a path towards which they look. They, in their own way, strive for good, preach truth and justice, and emphasize good human and divine relationships.

The Qur’an considers this multiplicity of traditions simply as a divine act and asks believers to submit to the will of their Lord. This is reflected in two sophisticated verses which state: “… if your Lord willed, all who are on the earth would have believed together. Would you (Muhammad) compel men until they are believers? It is not for any soul to believe without the permission of Allah. He has put uncleanness on those who have no sense ”(10: 99-100). These verses make some key statements. Some of them are:

First, if Allah willed, He would have created them all as one uniformed community looking exactly the same. But he did not do it ; He made people diverse in terms of, say, language, color, culture, belief.

The verses give legitimacy to the diversity of religions.

Second, as some interpret it, the Prophet (pbuh) is asked if he would disapprove of those who disbelieved in His message. Then comes the final decision after which no arguments remain. Allah says, remember, no soul can submit to His message until there is the will of God (tawfiq).

Third, the revelation asks the Prophet: would you force them to believe you? The answer is no. In fact, God does not want His Messenger to put pressure on anyone because the Qur’an clearly tells him that he is not a “wakil” on them (10:10; 6:10) to ensure that they are ‘they believe.

Fourth, those who do not reflect on this (fact of the matter or the mystery of God), and continue to cry out on the question of why people do not believe the message which was conveyed by the Prophet, are despised .

Fifth, these verses give legitimacy to the diversity of religions and their acceptance as part of the divine order of things. The Prophet’s clear direction in the Qur’an is to invite people to the right path but to allow them to accept or reject it; in other words, no coercion is encouraged. Why? Because, as Sachedina rightly says in The Islamic Roots of Democratic Pluralism: “As soon as religion is coerced, it breeds hypocrisy. Sura al-Kafirun amply demonstrates this spirit by saying: “Yours be your way, and I mine”.

Let us take another verse which further reinforces the message of the essential unity of religions: “For each one We have designated a divine law and a marked path. If Allah had willed, he could have made a community of you [ummah]. But so that He may test you by what He gave you (He made you as you are). So compete with each other in good works. All of you will return to Allah, and He will then inform you of your differences ”(5:48). The verse is so self-explanatory that it does not need to be elaborated.

An even stronger message about the harmony of religious traditions comes from another verse which says: “If Allah had not controlled one group of people by means of another, surely there would have been monasteries, churches. , synagogues and mosques, in which the name of Allah is commemorated in abundance ”(22:40). The key point here is that many people cannot stand different places of worship, but God, in His infinite mercy, wants to protect them from fanatics. Doesn’t the verse reflect a more sympathetic attitude towards places of worship of different communities, not just Muslims?

The Qur’an gives us a universal message relating to the unity of leadership by making a strong statement of the universality of the divine message: “But you are truly a warner and for every people a guide” (13: 7) and “. ..there never was a people, without a warner living among them (in the past). ”(35:24) Thus, God’s messengers gave counsel according to contextual issues, cultures, languages ​​and ways of life Although they may appear different in their exoteric form, they essentially resonate with a shared message.

The writer is an educator interested in the study of religion and philosophy.

Posted in Dawn, le 26 November 2021


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What is the religion of Naughty Boy in I’m a Celebrity? https://helviti.com/what-is-the-religion-of-naughty-boy-in-im-a-celebrity/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 10:56:57 +0000 https://helviti.com/what-is-the-religion-of-naughty-boy-in-im-a-celebrity/ Music producer Naughty Boy is featured this year I am a celebrity, which kicked off last Sunday. I’m a celebrity, get me out of here 2021 is well advanced and the camp comrades are all installed in the camp. We’ve seen a few hardships so far, from the plank walk to the dreaded dinner for […]]]>

Music producer Naughty Boy is featured this year I am a celebrity, which kicked off last Sunday.

I’m a celebrity, get me out of here 2021 is well advanced and the camp comrades are all installed in the camp. We’ve seen a few hardships so far, from the plank walk to the dreaded dinner for two.

Naughty Boy is one of ten campmates currently in the Welsh Castle. Reality titbit found out what the musician’s religion is and explored why he turned down the offer to be on the show last year …

Introducing Your 2021 Celebrity Camp Fellow! | I’m a celebrity… Get me out of here!

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What is the religion of Naughty Boy?

Naughty Boy is a Muslim. Before heading to Wales, he explained that he wanted to share everything about his faith with his fellow campmates.

In a press interview, he explained that he was “excited” by the conversation around his religion, and said:

“It’s something I want to get into because I’m a British Pakistani Muslim and I want to shine my light there and share my light with people, and we can also get to know each other’s religions.”

Earlier this year, Naughty Boy shared an Instagram post celebrating Eid with his close family. They celebrated by tasting dishes prepared by Naughty Boy Kitchen.

Naughty Boy was invited to appear on the show in 2020

Naughty Boy is best known for working with major artists such as Zayn Malik, Beyoncé, and Sam Smith, so it’s no wonder he was asked to take part in I’m a celebrity, get me out of here! before.

In 2020, the 36-year-old was invited to appear on the show, but declined the offer for his mother’s sake. Her mother was diagnosed with dementia in 2019, and Naughty Boy has been her caregiver ever since.

He explained that last year it would have been too risky to leave her alone for a few weeks, especially during COVID-19 when it was difficult to get support. Naughty Boy has since said:

“She was very worried that I was leaving last year but this year it’s the other way around – she’s excited”

  • NETFLIX: Here’s where Blown Away Christmas is filmed

I’m a Celebrity: Viewers Respond to Naughty Boy

Although we’ve only been 2 days on the new series, Naughty Boy has already made a big impression on viewers. During Sunday night’s episode, we saw him really live up to his name as he smuggled spices into the camp to lighten up his rice and beans – and of course, the memes no. ‘have since stopped driving.

A Twitter user wrote: “Naughty boy has been here for less than 2 days and I already love him”. Many viewers are surprised that he is called “Naughty Boy” in the castle, rather than his real name Shahid Khan.

LOOK I AM A CELEBRITY… GET ME OUT OF HERE! ON ITV EVERY DAY AT 9 P.M.

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US under fire for attack on religious freedom: the Tribune India https://helviti.com/us-under-fire-for-attack-on-religious-freedom-the-tribune-india/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 01:46:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/us-under-fire-for-attack-on-religious-freedom-the-tribune-india/ Tribune press service New Delhi, November 20 The United States, which ranked countries last week on the Religious Freedom Index, has come under attack for shortcomings in this regard. Estimates indicate that 617 people were killed in places of worship in the United States in 20 years, between 1999 and 2019. This includes the murder […]]]>

Tribune press service

New Delhi, November 20

The United States, which ranked countries last week on the Religious Freedom Index, has come under attack for shortcomings in this regard.

Estimates indicate that 617 people were killed in places of worship in the United States in 20 years, between 1999 and 2019. This includes the murder of six members of a gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, and the murder of nine members. of Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston in 2015.

Two decades, 1,000 criminal incidents

  • American churches saw 19 fatal shootings between 2000 and 2020
  • Hate crimes reach their highest level in two decades, with more than 1,000 religious incidents

The places of worship of religious minorities were not the only targets between 2000 and 2020. American churches have seen 19 fatal shootings. According to official statistics, hate crimes reached their highest level in two decades in 2020, with more than 1,000 incidents of a religious nature.

These attacks have led to requests for increases in the Nonprofit Security Grant (NPSG) program, which allows any at-risk nonprofit, including places of worship and other religious institutions, to seek financial support to protect themselves. violence.

MP Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said increased funding for the NPSG program will allow other marginalized groups to secure their communities. Max Sevillia of the Anti-Defamation League estimates that 80% of Protestant pastors say their church has security measures in place. Recently, Congress allocated $ 90 million for this program this year and $ 180 million next year. “Even though the funds for the program have increased, the money available has not kept up with the scale of the problem,” Sevillia said.


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Why science and religion come together to discuss alien life https://helviti.com/why-science-and-religion-come-together-to-discuss-alien-life/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 22:30:06 +0000 https://helviti.com/why-science-and-religion-come-together-to-discuss-alien-life/ A recent visit to the Washington National Cathedral began with a tour led by its dean Randy Hollerith, who showed me the fragment of a moon rock brought to one of its windows in 1974 by Apollo 11. I I was humbled by the remarkable architecture of the Cathedral. The visit was followed by a […]]]>

A recent visit to the Washington National Cathedral began with a tour led by its dean Randy Hollerith, who showed me the fragment of a moon rock brought to one of its windows in 1974 by Apollo 11. I I was humbled by the remarkable architecture of the Cathedral.

The visit was followed by a fascinating Ignatius Forum on “The Future of Space”, to which I was invited along with Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines, NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, Jeff Bezos de Blue Origin and Durham University theologian David Wilkinson.

The forum touched on various perspectives of space exploration, including science, national security and business. The common thread that ran through all related conversations was the possible existence of extraterrestrial civilizations.

Hinting at this, David Ignatius of the Washington Post asked Nelson and Haines, “What’s the most exciting project in your organization? They both replied, “It’s classified.”

With pleasure, I had the chance to represent the Galileo project, which embodies a different answer to this question: “it is not classified”. Sometimes I feel like the kid of the famous Danish folk tale which noted that the emperor has no clothes, where the emperor in my case is the mainstream science that has ignored the search for extraterrestrial equipment in space for many decades.

As soon as I entered the cathedral, Dean Hollerith said, “I understand that you are not a person of faith.” I confirm. But during my discussion with him and Reverend Wilkinson, I admitted that based on my studies of the universe as a scientist, I came to three principles common to many religions:

1) The first and most important is the sense of modesty. The cosmic play began 13.8 billion years before we became actors in it. The realization that we arrived late and also that we are not placed in the center of the stage, implies that the play does not concern us.

In a previous conversation with Adi Ignatius of Harvard Business School, Jeff BezosJeffrey (Jeff) Preston BezosSanders vows to oppose the defense bill: “We have to define our priorities well” NASA wants to pilot the obsolete space launch system for at least 30 years, Glen De Vries, passenger of Blue Origin, killed in plane crash in New Jersey MORE described the exhilaration he felt going to space recently. In my conversation with the Reverends, I noted that Bevos lifted his body barely one percent of Earth’s radius while the universe is 10 to the 19th power (or 10 quintillion) times larger than this. ladder. Showing off in space is an oxymoron.

2) The second principle that guides me as a practicing scientist is curiosity. By studying the universe, astronomers want to understand how man came to exist on a rocky planet like Earth near a star like the Sun in a galaxy like the Milky Way.

3) Finally, the cosmic perspective rewards us with a sense of calm. We live so short and there’s no point in getting too attached to our passing ambitions, given the grand scheme of things.

My convergence on these principles, which connect science and religion, may explain why Rabbi Rob Dobrusin gave a sermon to his congregation in Michigan about my recent book, “Extraterrestrial,” during the Jewish High Holidays this year.

Science and religion are not necessarily in conflict, as long as we are careful not to ignore the border between physical and metaphysical. Speaking with Rev. Hollerith and Rev. Wilkinson, I highlighted a scenario through which science and religion could actually be unified in the future.

By finding advanced alien intelligence, religion might just mirror advanced science with a twist. Traditional religions described God as the creator of the universe and the life within it. They also suggested that humans were created in the image of God. But these notions are not necessarily at odds with science. A sufficiently advanced scientific civilization might be able to create synthetic life in its laboratories – in fact, some of our Earth laboratories have almost reached that threshold. And with a good understanding of how to unify quantum mechanics and gravity, an advanced scientific civilization could potentially create a baby universe in its laboratories. Therefore, an advanced scientific civilization might be a good approximation of God.

Humans are currently creating artificial intelligence (AI) systems in their image. In the future, our civilization will likely launch AI astronauts into space. This would make more sense than sending many people into space, as Bezos envisions in this forum, since humans were selected by Darwinian evolution to survive on the surface of the Earth and not in the Earth. space. Cosmic rays and energetic radiation pose health risks to biological creatures like us more than to electronic AI systems.

How to unify religion and science? By finding AI astronauts from a scientific civilization much more advanced than us. The Galileo project aims to search for extraterrestrial equipment near Earth.

The question remains: Did God – in his religious or scientific interpretations – create humans in his image or did humans imagine the concept of God in their minds? The Galileo project can address the scientific context of this question.

Avi Loeb is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and was the Longest-serving Chair in History in the Department of Astronomy at Harvard University (2011-2020). He is the founding director of Harvard Black Hole Initiative, Director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Institute for Theory and Computation Center for Astrophysics, and the Chairs and Advisory Board of the Breakthrough Starshot Project. Loeb is the former chairman of the Physics and Astronomy Council of the National Academies and a former member of the Presidential Council of Science and Technology Advisors at the White House. He is the bestselling author of “Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth”, recently published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.



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Professor William Jennings recognized for his work combining race, religion and the environment https://helviti.com/professor-william-jennings-recognized-for-his-work-combining-race-religion-and-the-environment/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 05:48:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/professor-william-jennings-recognized-for-his-work-combining-race-religion-and-the-environment/ Yale Daily News William “Willie” Jennings, associate professor of systematic theology and African studies at Yale Divinity School, discussed his work making the connection between theology and race in an interview that featured on the cover of the important theological publication. The Christian Century. The interview, “Whiteness rooted in place,” which appeared in the November […]]]>

Yale Daily News

William “Willie” Jennings, associate professor of systematic theology and African studies at Yale Divinity School, discussed his work making the connection between theology and race in an interview that featured on the cover of the important theological publication. The Christian Century.

The interview, “Whiteness rooted in place,” which appeared in the November 3 issue of The Christian Century, was conducted following a talk Jennings gave for the non-profit Veritas Forum. which organizes Christian conferences on faith and reason on university campuses. Jennings began by discussing the relationship between race, place and religion, before blazing the trail for greater unity in the United States and abroad.

“Right now is a great time for anyone interested in matters of religion, race and the environment to be at Yale,” Jennings told The News.

According to Jennings, at Divinity School, he sought to create a form of interdisciplinary study by combining theological studies, black studies and critical geography, which also incorporates aspects of environmental studies.

“It’s new to Yale – there have been colleagues who have done parts of this in the past, but trying to bring all of these things together is definitely new to Yale,” Jennings said. “It’s not new to the academy in terms of different areas of study, but having someone within theological studies trying to bring them all together is new.”

Jennings characterized the multidisciplinary approach as an emerging field within the theological community and emphasized that it is structured to include previously excluded groups in discussions surrounding issues of race, place and religion.

According to Jennings, the interdisciplinary combination of theology and race has given students access to courses that cover today’s most pressing issues across a wide range of materials and approaches and enabled them make new connections.

“It’s really exciting to have students with us at Divinity School to think about that – the relationship between how we see ourselves beyond race issues, how we imagine how to care for the environment, and whatever other efforts you are aiming at in your studies, to bring all of these elements together – and if we are talking about people of faith, to integrate it into their vision of faith – it is exciting, ”said Jennings.

In addition to her classroom work, Jennings has also had an influence on Divinity School’s diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging initiatives, according to Divinity School Dean Gregory Sterling. Jennings co-chaired an anti-racism task force that helped the school revise its strategic plan for DEIB, Sterling said.

“Willie Jennings is a vital faculty member at Divinity School,” Sterling told The News. “He is a leading intellectual who commands the respect of his peers. He is also one of the most visible public intellectuals in our faculty… He is quite simply exceptional.

Jennings’ multidisciplinary approach has given her the opportunity to collaborate with a wide range of faculty, many of whom come from Divinity School and the School of the Environment.

John Grim and Mary Evelyn Tucker, co-founders of the Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology and professors at the Divinity School and the School of the Environment, have spent much of their careers making similar multidisciplinary connections with Jennings. According to Tucker, the couple have collaborated with Jennings on several occasions and, through their work, have formed a strong relationship with the wider interdisciplinary movement.

John Grim noted that Jennings represents more than her research through her outspoken role in the theological community.

“From the start when we met Willie, we recognized and shared with him a joy and a hope, and that he is a smart spokesperson for that joy and for hope,” said Grim.

Willie Jennings will be teaching a class called Body and Land in the spring.


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