Religion christian – Helviti http://helviti.com/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 22:21:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://helviti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-1-120x120.png Religion christian – Helviti http://helviti.com/ 32 32 Confederate memorials still divide Americans and religion is a big predictor https://helviti.com/confederate-memorials-still-divide-americans-and-religion-is-a-big-predictor/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 22:21:04 +0000 https://helviti.com/confederate-memorials-still-divide-americans-and-religion-is-a-big-predictor/ (RNS) — “The past is never dead. It didn’t even pass,” William Faulkner once joked. The Mississippi writer was right — at least when it came to the Civil War, anyway. A war that divided America as it unfolded continues to do so in her memory. When it comes to commemorating the legacy of the […]]]>

(RNS) — “The past is never dead. It didn’t even pass,” William Faulkner once joked.

The Mississippi writer was right — at least when it came to the Civil War, anyway. A war that divided America as it unfolded continues to do so in her memory.

When it comes to commemorating the legacy of the Civil War, Americans are almost evenly divided on whether to preserve Confederate symbols, memorials and statues, according to a new survey from the Public Religion Research Institute.

New PRRI survey conducted with E Pluribus Unum, a nonprofit dedicated to building a more equitable and inclusive South, finds 51% of Americans favor preserving history, memorials and statues Confederates, while 46% oppose it.

This division is found on a host of issues. Take the Confederate flag: 50% see it primarily as a symbol of Southern pride, while 47% see it primarily as a symbol of racism.

The divisions are split along party, race and religion lines: Republicans and white evangelicals overwhelmingly support the preservation of memorials to Confederate history, while black Americans, non-Christians, Jews and Americans unaffiliated see these monuments as a symbol of racism.

“One of the things the report tells us is that we still haven’t resolved one of the fundamental conflicts that has haunted us throughout American history,” said Robert P. Jones, president and founder of PRRI. “It’s the question of whether the country is a promised land for European Christians that has white supremacy built into that idea, or whether we’re a pluralist democracy where everyone is on an equal footing before the Constitution. .”

The Southern Poverty Law Center database shows that there are more than 2,000 Confederate symbols in the United States and Puerto Rico, disproportionately in 11 Southern states.

But the divisions of the country over the legacy of the Confederacy are more important than geography. They exist in all parts of the country and can be best predicted by party affiliation, race and religion.

Nearly 9 in 10 white Republicans, or 87%, support efforts to preserve the legacy of the Confederacy, compared to 23% of white Democrats. When examined by race, 57% of white Americans support efforts to preserve Confederate heritage, compared to 23% of black Americans.

Religion is also a predictor of attitudes toward Confederation. The majority of Protestants, Catholics and Latter-day Saints support such efforts to preserve Confederate monuments and memorials, with white evangelicals outperforming all others at 76%.

Support drops to 35% among non-Christian Americans, American Jews (33%) and Americans with no religious affiliation (33%).

The survey was conducted with a sample of 5,439 adults in all 50 states. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 1.7 percentage points.


RELATED: Poor People’s Campaign urges Congress to vote on salaries and voting rights before midterms


The survey revealed some commonalities. Almost all Americans (90%) supported efforts to “tell the truth about the history of slavery, violence and discrimination against racial minorities” as well as efforts to “promote racial healing by creating more inclusive public spaces”.

And a majority of Americans support some form of landmark reform. The PRRI survey broke support and opposition to reforming Confederate memorials into four categories: 24% said they supported removing all Confederate memorials, 18% said they s opposed the removal of memorials, 30% leaned towards reform and 24% were against reform.

Liberal Democrats and Independent Liberals were 20 times more likely to support removing the Confederate monument than conservative Republicans. Americans with no religious affiliation and non-Christian Americans were twice as likely as white evangelicals to support the pullout.

Black Americans were three times more likely to support the pullout than white Americans.

Americans were also split over renaming public schools and mascots. But the majority of Americans favored the idea of ​​local governments providing mortgage assistance to people whose descendants were denied home loans because of their race. A majority also supports scholarships for descendants of slaves forced to build these campuses. (White Christians were least likely to favor these efforts.)

E Pluribus Unum, an organization founded by former New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, works in 13 states, including among religious congregations, to spark a conversation about systemic racism and economic inequality.

“We use a phrase, ‘relentless incrementalism,'” said Scott Hutcheson, chief executive of E Pluribus Unum. “Each data point shows us a path. It’s depressing but we have to believe it’s not hopeless.

Ahead of the Trend is a collaborative effort between Religion News Service and the Association of Religion Data Archives made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation. See other Ahead of the Trend articles here.


RELATED: Study: More than 3/4 of Republican evangelicals want the United States declared a Christian nation


]]>
It’s hard to miss facts about faith and scripture in the life of Tennessee QB Hendon Hooker – GetReligion https://helviti.com/its-hard-to-miss-facts-about-faith-and-scripture-in-the-life-of-tennessee-qb-hendon-hooker-getreligion/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 15:59:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/its-hard-to-miss-facts-about-faith-and-scripture-in-the-life-of-tennessee-qb-hendon-hooker-getreligion/ So, let me jot down a story of two in the East Tennessee media who spotted crucial facts of faith about this calm and steady quarterback and incorporated them into a grassroots sports page – the feature pre-match rituals. The title at Knoxville News Sentinel read: “How Hendon Hooker will calm his nerves before Tennessee […]]]>

So, let me jot down a story of two in the East Tennessee media who spotted crucial facts of faith about this calm and steady quarterback and incorporated them into a grassroots sports page – the feature pre-match rituals. The title at Knoxville News Sentinel read: “How Hendon Hooker will calm his nerves before Tennessee football plays in Florida.” The question of faith was even part of the opening:

The Neyland stadium will switch before tennessee football plays Florida…, but Hendon Hooker will go into slow-jam mode and lean on his faith.

ESPN College game day will ignite the crowd. Checker Neyland will create a whole scene. And the sold-out crowd will rock the stadium moments before the Vols cross the Power T.

A few lines later, there is this basic quote:

“I just go into meditation mode and put on my gospel playlist,” Hooker said Monday. “I really listen to a lot of slow jams and really relax. I kind of go into the locker room and mop everyone up, just to make sure I’m ready to ride. And they reassure me by the look in their eyes that they’re ready to ride too.

Now, this is where this short story stopped for a moment and posed some follow-up questions.

Raise your hand if you think it would make sense to ask for sample music in this pre-game playlist. This story didn’t go into great detail, but it liked this topic to one of the most interesting facts about the quarterback’s resume.

Hooker’s playlist still includes Grammy-nominated gospel singer Kiki Sheard, as well as Kirk Franklin and Fred Hammond. And when Tennessee quarterbacks know the game plan inside and out, they turn their attention to a different playbook.

“Me and (quarterback Joe Milton) have a devotional book that we read every day,” Hooker said. “So before the game, we’ll read a page or two.”

It’s no surprise that faith plays a part in Hooker’s pregame ritual. One of his first forays into the space of name, image and likeness was to create a faith-based children’s book titled “The ABCs of Scripture for Athletes”.

If readers are interested in this topic, they can go to Hooker’s website – Hooked On Sports – or read nearly identical material in an article – “Meditation, gospel music key to Hooker’s pregame routine – in the Flights section of this fan-niche website, 247sports.com.

I would ask if “meditation” is another word for “prayer”. Also, it’s worth noting that the religious hooks in this story do not appear in a UT sports press release titled “‘Brotherhood’ Helping Tennessee QB Duo Flourish.”

It’s all the more interesting because the deep friendship between Hooker and Milton really raises eyebrows. Why? Milton was the 2021 starter until an injury put Hooker on the field and the rest is Vols history.

College football fans all know what’s supposed to happen next in the era of the NCAA’s “transfer portal” – that legal wormhole that allows athletes to hop from school to school in search of a place in the starting line-up. Again, some stars may seek a better financial deal under the “Name, Image, Likeness” rules allowing them to be paid for promotional work with local, regional or national brands.

So why is the massive, talented, and fast Milton still at UT-Knoxville?

]]>
A passion for religion: at 25, he becomes the youngest holder of a doctorate at the faculty of theology of the UP https://helviti.com/a-passion-for-religion-at-25-he-becomes-the-youngest-holder-of-a-doctorate-at-the-faculty-of-theology-of-the-up/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 12:20:53 +0000 https://helviti.com/a-passion-for-religion-at-25-he-becomes-the-youngest-holder-of-a-doctorate-at-the-faculty-of-theology-of-the-up/ Yuvan Mathias Shunmugam is the youngest doctoral graduate from the Faculty of Theology and Religion at the University of Pretoria. The 25 year recearned her doctorate in Religious Studies at the spring 2022 graduation ceremony. He spends a lot of time contributing to initiatives centered on the preservation and propagation of his mother tongue, Tamil. […]]]>
  • Yuvan Mathias Shunmugam is the youngest doctoral graduate from the Faculty of Theology and Religion at the University of Pretoria.
  • The 25 year recearned her doctorate in Religious Studies at the spring 2022 graduation ceremony.
  • He spends a lot of time contributing to initiatives centered on the preservation and propagation of his mother tongue, Tamil.

Born in KwaZulu-Natal, Yuvan Mathias Shunmugam made history as the youngest doctoral graduate in 105 years of history from the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Pretoria (UP) .

According to the university, 25-year-old Shunmugam earned his doctorate in the science of religion during the spring 2022 graduation ceremonies at the university’s Hillcrest campus.

His thesis was entitled: “The contribution of Nishkama Karma in the philosophies of Shankara, Ramanuja and Madhva on social cohesion”.

“My lens examined the Hindu concept of Nishkama Karma and its contribution to the promotion and advancement of social cohesion,” Shunmugam said.

He said:

In my opinion, religion does not do enough in terms of promoting social cohesion.

Nishkama Karma is the act of a selfless or desireless action, or when someone does something without any expectation.

His thesis furthered the principle of altruism in the concept of Nishkama Karma towards developing a connection between Nishkama Karma and concern for the welfare of others.

“Often people focus on the afterlife, thinking about how to please God and how to live a life so that they can attain salvation. In Hinduism we say attaining moksha. In d “Other religions, you’d say ‘go to heaven’, or whatever. And that’s what people focus on, not necessarily how we can help make the world a better place.”

WATCH | “Without a base, there would be no foundation”: merchants and Capetonians reflect on Heritage Day

Many religions propagate the idea that the world is evil and that upon death one will go to a better place, Shunmugam added.

“That’s usually what religion or religions teach. And that’s something I’m afraid I don’t agree with. I think religion needs to do a lot more to promote a much better world,” he said. he added.

The young doctoral student is passionate about Hinduism, religious studies, social activism and language teaching. He sits in various leadership structures, contributing to social justice or decolonial narratives. In addition to religion, he studied archaeology, ancient languages ​​and psychology.

He also contributes to initiatives centered on the preservation and propagation of his mother tongue, Tamil.

He believes that education in the mother tongue is vital for cultural diversity and promotes peaceful and sustainable societies.

“My grandmother was a Tamil teacher and instilled in me my understanding and love for the language.”

Shunmugam credits his supervisor at UP, Professor Maniraj Sukdaven for supporting him and instilling in him a winning mentality.

“Having a supervisor dedicated to your success is important if you want to complete a PhD. I was blessed,” he added.

]]>
Catholics outnumber Protestants in Northern Ireland for the first time | Religion https://helviti.com/catholics-outnumber-protestants-in-northern-ireland-for-the-first-time-religion/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 13:17:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/catholics-outnumber-protestants-in-northern-ireland-for-the-first-time-religion/ Catholics outnumber Protestants in Northern Ireland for the first time, a demographic milestone for a state that was designed a century ago to have a permanent Protestant majority. The results of the 2021 census released on Thursday showed that 45.7% of the inhabitants are Catholic or of Catholic origin compared to 43.48% of Protestant or […]]]>

Catholics outnumber Protestants in Northern Ireland for the first time, a demographic milestone for a state that was designed a century ago to have a permanent Protestant majority.

The results of the 2021 census released on Thursday showed that 45.7% of the inhabitants are Catholic or of Catholic origin compared to 43.48% of Protestant or Christian origin. The 2011 census figures were 45% Catholic and 48% Protestant. Neither block has a majority.

The demographic tilt was expected but will always deal a psychological blow to trade unionists, who for decades have relied on a supposedly impregnable Protestant majority to safeguard Northern Ireland’s position in the UK.

Diarmaid Ferriter, historian and author, said: “It has been a long time coming. They have already witnessed the loss of their political supremacy. Seeing the loss of their numerical supremacy is another blow.

Higher birth rates among Catholics gradually closed the gap, a closely watched measure since they tended to identify as Irish while Protestants tended to identify as British. But religious background and political identity no longer automatically transfer to voting habits, Ferriter said. “So much is blurry now.”

In recent elections, support for nationalist and unionist parties peaked at around 40% for each side, leaving a middle 20% of voters who are unaligned and reject traditional sectarian labels. Opinion polls consistently show that more people would rather stay in the UK – citing taxes and the NHS, among other reasons – than unite with Ireland.

However. the census, the first since Brexit, showed a loosening of British identity. Some 31.86% identified as British only, 29.13% as Irish only and 19.78% as Northern Irish only. In 2011 the figures were 40% British only, 25% Irish only and 21% Northern Irish only.

The census, released by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, also showed Northern Ireland had its highest population of 1.9million, an increase of 5% compared to 2011. It is ageing, with the number of people aged over 65 increasing by nearly 25%. .

Data on religious background – a stark contrast to the founding of the state in 1921, when Britain separated six counties from the rest of Ireland to create a two-thirds Protestant entity – comes in at a difficult time for trade unionism. A post-Brexit Irish Sea border has put trade barriers between Northern Ireland and Britain. In May’s assembly elections, Sinn Féin overtook the Democratic Unionist Party as Northern Ireland’s largest party, bolstering its calls for a referendum on Irish unity.

Duncan Morrow, professor of politics at Ulster University, said: “The state was created to put a ring of protection around Protestants. You cannot remove the symbolic scope of this change.

In a referendum, Northern Ireland’s fate could rest with centrist voters who defy easy political categorization, with many feeling Northern Irish as opposed to Irish or British, Morrow said. Young people were most eager for Irish unity, he added. “It’s a ticking clock.”

Patricia McBride, spokeswoman for Ireland’s Future, a group that promotes border polling, said religious affiliation and national identity would not necessarily determine how people voted. Taxation, public services and other key issues could be decisive, she added.

“People are much more likely to question whether they are better off financially or not. It’s not as simple as voting with the heart, people will also vote with the head,” she said.

]]>
Ely Center gets religion | New Haven Independent https://helviti.com/ely-center-gets-religion-new-haven-independent/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 13:13:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/ely-center-gets-religion-new-haven-independent/ The small gallery on the first floor of the Ely Center of Contemporary Art is flooded with multicolored light. It darkens the room as a whole but has the effect of making the atmosphere more vibrant. The gallery becomes a place where you might want to linger, the same way people linger in all places […]]]>

The small gallery on the first floor of the Ely Center of Contemporary Art is flooded with multicolored light. It darkens the room as a whole but has the effect of making the atmosphere more vibrant. The gallery becomes a place where you might want to linger, the same way people linger in all places bustling with color, from rooms adorned with Christmas lights to meadows full of wildflowers. It’s a place to take a breather and, in keeping with the theme of an exhibition currently taking place there, think about a new beginning.

The exhibition features window paintings and typographic prints depicting scenes from the Book of Genesis, as imagined by artist, art historian and curator Jonathan Weinberg. Genesis” is now taking place at the Ely Center on Trumbull Street until January 5.

Glass paintings and prints represent several years of work,” Weinberg wrote in an illuminating accompanying statement. Undoubtedly, they are a response to the traumatic quality of our recent politics, covid, and be curled up with a small circle of friends and family. But also, they are influenced by my work as curator of the Maurice Sendak Foundation, and the opportunity it has given me to spend so much time with the extraordinary art of Sendak, as well as the prints of the artists who he collected, like William Blake and Félix Vallotton.

Weinberg discovered his art by experimenting with Plaid Gallery Glass, a substance intended to mimic stained glass. My first paintings were installed in the windows of my house. Inspired by William Blake, I chose to depict Jacob’s Ladder, from Genesis, because its theme of transcendence always seemed to me to resonate with the artist’s task of taking mundane materials and transforming them into something wonderful. I associated this image with the building of Noah’s Ark, a story of salvation and hope amidst the most traumatic times. During the covid crisis, when I was stuck at home, I started doing prints, and I came back to these themes by re-reading Genesis and finding key stories that I could turn into pictures.

Weinberg first created the images on an iPad, edited them in Photoshop, and transferred them digitally onto the clear polymer. The windows are full of allusions to famous works of art,” he wrote, ranging from Masaccio to Blake, from Picasso to David, from Homer to Sendak. He delights in to use such an unexpected and inexpensive medium to create a dramatic, even spiritual effect. This was for me the essence of Jacob’s dream, how in a completely banal place, resting on a hard stone, he fell asleep and dreamed of angels ascending to heaven, and of God’s grace.

Jonathan Weinberg

The flood.

Weinberg’s deeply human and humanistic interpretation of the Genesis story is widely exhibited in the typographic pieces also displayed in the same gallery. There’s the fact that he devotes an entire portion of the story of Noah’s Flood to a group of people who failed to get on the Ark, who were left to suffer the consequences. We are told that they were punished for their wickedness, but that is not what Weinberg portrays; it shows their confusion and fear, perhaps even their desire to repent, even though they know it is too late.

Jonathan Weinberg

Jacob Wrestles with the Angel.

Likewise, Weinberg’s depiction of Jacob wrestling with the angel expresses his brutal physicality – the the struggle” in the story was not a metaphor – showing Weinberg’s gift for showing complicated kinetic movement with just a few lines. It is also evident that Weinberg may have found himself curator of Maurice’s work Sendak There’s a sense of eerie playfulness similar to that found in the best work of the famous children’s author.

The windows then add another layer of meaning to Weinberg’s approach to scriptural history. Most of us are, of course, used to seeing stained glass primarily in places of worship. In these places, the stories are openly, perhaps by definition, given a reverential treatment. The Ely Center of Contemporary Art is a secular space, and almost more of a house than a gallery. Weinberg’s treatment of his subjects in stained glass mirrors his treatment of them in his typographic images. Weinberg is right that rendering his images in stained glass creates a dramatic, even spiritual effect. But it also moves in the other direction. His approach humanizes stories, making them more relatable. He brings them back to earth.

Jonathan Weinberg: Genesis” runs at the Ely Center of Contemporary Art, 51 Trumbull St., through January 5. Visit the ECOCA website for hours and more information.

]]>
Ebenezer Baptist Church honors MLK’s sister, Dr. Christine King Farris | local religion https://helviti.com/ebenezer-baptist-church-honors-mlks-sister-dr-christine-king-farris-local-religion/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/ebenezer-baptist-church-honors-mlks-sister-dr-christine-king-farris-local-religion/ Ebenezer Baptist Church held a special church service to commemorate the 95th birthday of the oldest congregant in the history of one of Atlanta’s oldest churches. When Dr. Christine King Farris, a former Spelman College professor, Atlanta Public Schools teacher and author, entered the sanctuary, the congregation, the Spelman College Glee Club Ebenezer church choirs […]]]>

Ebenezer Baptist Church held a special church service to commemorate the 95th birthday of the oldest congregant in the history of one of Atlanta’s oldest churches.

When Dr. Christine King Farris, a former Spelman College professor, Atlanta Public Schools teacher and author, entered the sanctuary, the congregation, the Spelman College Glee Club Ebenezer church choirs greeted her with songs. and applause.

The older sister of the late civil rights icon, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Farris, had been baptized into the church and is therefore its longest continuous participant. A former choir member, Farris watched her grandfather, father and younger brothers – Dr King and the late Reverend Alfred Daniel Williams King – preach from the same pulpit as the church’s pastors.

His mother, the late Alberta Williams King, director of the choir for over 20 years. Ebenezer Baptist Church is home and what better place to celebrate a birthday than home.

Reverend Sen. Raphael Warnock (Ga.-R), the fifth pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, spoke about the big sister/little brother relationship between Farris and his brother “ML.”

‘Thank goodness for big sisters,’ Warnock said as he told the biblical story of baby Moses placed in a basket and sent down the river by his mother to be found by the king’s daughter and raised once more in the palace by his mother. . Moses’ sister watched the baby float down the river but never took her eyes off him, Warnock said. “Thank goodness for Dr. Christine King Farris, the longest serving member of the Ebenezer Baptist Church,” he said.

“If people who are 25 were as strong as Dr. Christine King Farris was at 95, the church would be much better off.”

Farris’ niece, Dr. Bernice King, CEO of the King Center, then took the microphone and spoke about her aunt’s work in establishing and helping to run the King Center as Vice President and Treasurer. many years ago after the murder of his youngest brother, the centre’s namesake.

“We are here today to obviously celebrate 95 years of life, a woman of strength, a woman of grace, a woman of dignity, elegance, resilience, faith and great integrity and inspiration,” King said. . “A woman who served the King Center for 51 years.”

King added, “We love you, happy birthday, God bless you and may you go on living 95 more years.”

Andrew Young, former US Ambassador, Mayor of the City of Atlanta and confidant of MLK, took the opportunity to sing I Love Everybody in My Heart when he had the chance to speak. Young has been a friend of Farris and the King family for decades.

Farris was seen as a tight-lipped woman by many attendees, but her work as an educator and author continues to enlighten and entertain. She occasionally read her book “My Brother Martin” to visitors to the King Center. Judy Forte, Superintendent of Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park, presented Farris with a golden crystal as a birthday present and said, “I promise that we will treasure your stories and tell them faithfully for future generations. ”

The Spelman Glee Club sang their rendition of Wade In The Water and got everyone on their feet.

Performances by Ebenezer Baptist Church psalmist Tamika Patton-Watkins, gospel artist Angel Taylor Capehart and former Spelman College music teacher Laura English-Robinson were highlights of the church service.

]]>
Religious News | News, Sports, Jobs https://helviti.com/religious-news-news-sports-jobs-2/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 04:24:33 +0000 https://helviti.com/religious-news-news-sports-jobs-2/ APPOINTMENT: Bishop David J. Bonnar of the Diocese of Youngstown has appointed the Most Reverend John-Michael Lavelle as Director of Stewardship and Development, effective September 1, in addition to his responsibilities as Vicar for Missionary Discipleship and Pastor from St. Michael Parish to Canfield. The appointment aligns the Office of Stewardship and Development […]]]>

APPOINTMENT: Bishop David J. Bonnar of the Diocese of Youngstown has appointed the Most Reverend John-Michael Lavelle as Director of Stewardship and Development, effective September 1, in addition to his responsibilities as Vicar for Missionary Discipleship and Pastor from St. Michael Parish to Canfield. The appointment aligns the Office of Stewardship and Development within the Department of Missionary Discipleship.

Under Lavelle’s leadership, the Office of Stewardship and Development will continue to develop and direct the annual Diocesan Appeal: One in Hope, One in Mission, as well as the Diocese of Youngstown Foundation.

Lavelle was appointed Vicar for Missionary Discipleship in 2021 and currently sits on the Diocesan Board of Directors. He was ordained in 2000 and has served as pastor at Immaculate Conception Parish, Ravenna, and Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish, Niles, and as associate pastor at St. Mary’s Parish, Massillon, and St. Christine, Youngstown

WHO IS JESUS? “Who is this Jesus? the course will be offered Thursdays at noon at the Howland Library, 9095 E, Market St. The free eight-week course will be led by Pastor Dan Barker. A detailed syllabus will be provided to facilitate group discussion. To register, call 330-637-1421.

CHURCH PLANS 102 YEARS: The Disciples of Third Christian Church of Christ, 241 First St. SW, Warren, will celebrate the church’s 102nd anniversary with events planned each Sunday in September. The celebratory events are: Sunday – guest speaker Pastor Leroy Jenkins; and September 25 – musical afternoon.

MISSION TALK: Matthew and Kened (Bennett) Cross, who grew up in Southington and Warren respectively, do missionary work in Haiti and recently hosted a fundraising event. The Crosses will speak about their missionary work at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Warren Church and at 10:30 a.m. Sept. 25 at Cortland Trinity Baptist Church.

BACK TO CHURCH: Life Church, 610 S. Leavitt Road, Leavittsburg will host a Sunday back to church at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The event is part of a national event to welcome people to the church.

YOUTH EXPLOSION: Through him, Ministry 1244 Tod Place NW, Warren, will host a youth explosion service on September 25. There will be a choir, a praise dance team and lyrics by Shemar McMillion from the Youth Department. For more information, call 330-240-1586.

MEN’S RALLY: The Valley Men’s Rally, which hosts an annual event, is going through a period of reorganization. Two meetings are held to get a general consensus on the direction the rally is taking. The first is scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday at the Leetonia Public Library, 181 Walnut St., Leetonia. For questions, call Jim at 330-398-6098 or visit www.mensrally.org.

CONCERT AT THE CHURCH: First Baptist Church, 26 E. Church St., Niles, will host a concert at 2:30 p.m., Sunday with Niah and Allisha Merrill. The Merrills will present a concert of sacred music crossing the genres of traditional, classical and modern hymns. They sing and play an assortment of instruments (including piano, trumpets, flugelhorn, hand drums and Irish whistles) in a variety of inspiring musical styles. A love offering will be taken.

SCIENCE EVENT: The Corner House Christian Church will host a free science event ‘Professor Seven’s Amazing World of Science’ from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. today and 10:30 a.m. during worship. The event is free. There will be a barbecue, games and activities.

FRIENDS AND FAMILY: First Baptist Church of Braceville, 1300 Cedar Street SW, is hosting a friends and family event on September 25 with a worship service at 11 a.m., fun, food and fellowship at 1 p.m. .

PASTOR’S BIRTHDAY: The Warren Second Baptist Church will celebrate the seventh pastoral birthday of Pastor Todd and Lady Shameika Johnson at 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on September 25. The guest speaker at 10 a.m. is Reverend Ezra Tillman of Flint, Michigan, and at 5 p.m. is Elder Phillip Shealey of Covington, Ga.



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox









]]>
SyFy’s Chucky Season 2 Trailer Shows Killer Doll Finds Religion https://helviti.com/syfys-chucky-season-2-trailer-shows-killer-doll-finds-religion/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 21:09:00 +0000 https://helviti.com/syfys-chucky-season-2-trailer-shows-killer-doll-finds-religion/ SyFy Season 2 chucky The series just released a new trailer, and it looks like Chucky’s reign of terror is about to continue against the backdrop of a religious correctional school. chucky premiered on October 15, 2021 and followed teenage outcast Jake Wheeler (Zackary Arthur), who found himself bullied for his unconventional taste and sexuality. […]]]>

SyFy Season 2 chucky The series just released a new trailer, and it looks like Chucky’s reign of terror is about to continue against the backdrop of a religious correctional school.


chucky premiered on October 15, 2021 and followed teenage outcast Jake Wheeler (Zackary Arthur), who found himself bullied for his unconventional taste and sexuality. After purchasing a vintage Good Guy doll, Jake discovers that the doll contains the soul of serial killer Charles Lee Ray, who seeks to make Jake a killer like himself. The Child’s play series has found a dedicated following and chucky was renewed for Season 2 on USA Network and SyFy.

GAMER VIDEO OF THE DAY

RELATED: Chucky’s seed was ahead of its time

New chucky The trailer, which was posted on Rotten Tomato’s YouTube account, sets the stage for the second season. After the season 1 massacre, Jake, her boyfriend Devon (Björgvin Arnarson) and her best friend Lexy (Alvia Alyn Lind) will attend Incarnate Lord, a school for troubled youth, to “learn from their mistakes by reflecting on their sins. “. But of course, the killer toy just refuses to stay away. As they serve their time at this sinister school, the trio must once again face Chucky, who wants to kill the staff, including a priest. as he leads his confessionals But this time there’s more than one Chucky, à la 2019 Child’s play.

The chucky The trailer shows that the series will once again focus on the struggles of being an LGBTQ+ person. The show cast Lachlan Watson as Glen/Glenda for season 2, whose character was referenced last season when Chucky mentioned having a “fluid kid.” Watson is non-binary, and the trailer makes many (both ironic and serious) references to homophobia, transphobia, and heteronormativity. In one scene, Tiffany (Jennifer Tilly, returning as both a doll and a human version of her character) holds Nica Pierce (Fiona Dourif) hostage, who continues to tell Glen and Glenda about her crimes. The two remark, “Mom is a murderer?!” before exclaiming “Mom is a lesbian?!” The trailer also focuses on more serious approaches, but it looks like Jake will face more homophobia in Incarnate Lord. Ominously, when the characters are told to “[think] on their sins,” a photo of Jake and Devon kissing appears onscreen.

Fans won’t have to wait long to Mandrely premiere of season 2, which will begin in October. The series airs again just in time for Halloween, and it’s the perfect show for horror-comedy fans to watch. Season 2 aligns perfectly with the dark, offbeat humor of the franchise, and with plenty of callbacks and references to previous Chucky films, it’s sure to be a fan favorite.

chucky Season 2 premieres October 5, 2022 on USA Network and SyFy.

MORE: Chucky Lives: Why The Killer Doll Remains Timeless

Source: Rotten Tomatoes TV/YouTube

]]>
How Religion Teaches Us About the Natural World https://helviti.com/how-religion-teaches-us-about-the-natural-world/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 11:05:31 +0000 https://helviti.com/how-religion-teaches-us-about-the-natural-world/ Karen Armstrong has planned another deep dive into the spaces between the known and the unknown with humanity and its host planet. His writing career has been defined by compressing endless, unknowable subjects into numbers of readable pages at your fingertips. Consider for a moment: some of Armstrong’s works are long by 21st century attention […]]]>

Karen Armstrong has planned another deep dive into the spaces between the known and the unknown with humanity and its host planet. His writing career has been defined by compressing endless, unknowable subjects into numbers of readable pages at your fingertips.

Consider for a moment: some of Armstrong’s works are long by 21st century attention span standards. She is, after all, the author of “A History of God,” which covered an impossible topic to cover in just 460 pages. Epic novels are praised for their importance covering these topics more loosely with more words. Yet Armstrong often goes a long way when writing about faith with results that have made her a bestselling author.

When Armstrong launched the new “Sacred Nature,” her handlers encouraged her to follow a different path.

“I spoke with my editor and my agent at the start of the pandemic,” she says. “A Zoom conversation. I told them that I wanted to write a story of how religions teach us about the natural world. I thought this would be another one of my big, fat books. They told me, ‘Karen, this time consider a short’

“They told me people need to read this now. Make a long one later. They urged me to talk to people about changing the way we think about nature.

Karen Armstrong

When: 7:30 p.m. September 12

Where: Congregation Emanu El, 1500 Sunset

Details: $45-$150 (includes a copy of “Sacred Nature”); progressforumhouston.org


Armstrong compressed centuries into a book that is no more than 200 pages. It’s far from exhaustive, which doesn’t mean it’s far from grand in scope.

Restore an “old link”

The subtitle of Armstrong’s book further explains a title that says a lot on its own: “Restoring our ancient connection to the natural world.”

The “sacred nature” serves as a sort of democratization for various denominational systems over thousands of years. While scientific study offers insight into why things are the way they are – nature, people, people and nature – there remains a great opacity in our existence. Armstrong in his new book suggests that certain cultures had systems that modern culture might call quaint. But as we witness natural disaster after natural disaster, we might do well to engage less with ourselves and more with our epic surroundings.

There is no easily identifiable single villain in “Sacred Nature”. The call, in the language of cinematic cliches, comes from within the house, as long as we agree that the house is the planet. And the killer is us.

That said, perhaps Descartes needs a new media representation. Perhaps also Newton, who is presented as a theologian rather than the label of scientist that our culture attributes to him. In “Sacred Nature”, philosophical concepts are not necessarily plotted as linear progress.

Armstrong’s book is thin, not light. It offers a polycontinental and multicultural look at how faith and space have coexisted for centuries. We have maintained the notion of gods, but pushed back on the ideas of, say, rain gods, and while scientific study has caused theological purges, Armstrong speaks of the value of such systems, which remain explainable. . . to a degree.

She presents in “Sacred Nature” ideas like the Greek “kenosis” and represents other denominational systems that had a more respectful affinity for the earth before ecology was a term. The book admires a time before a shift from when the big question was “Why are we here?” to “Why are we the way we are? »

The first question centers the planet with us as guests. The latter puts us at the heart of a planet that will exist long after it gets rid of us. Armstrong’s book chooses not to dive into this inevitable void, but rather to gently nudge us to decenter and find a new humility about the spaces we occupy.

“We are tiny creatures in the grand scheme of things,” says Armstrong. “Before going to bed, before falling asleep, it is worth remembering how little we know.”

In this sense, it is a perfect book to come out of a period of isolation and contemplation. For a moment, says Armstrong, we can recalibrate how we have “made ourselves totally oblivious to the brokenness of this world.”

On the pandemic, Armstrong says his visit to Houston this month for a conversation presented by the Progressive Forum on the book will be his first appearance since wrapping up his book tours and speaking engagements in 2020.

To look upward

Two years into the pandemic, I heard a high-pitched, unfamiliar sound skreeee from my home workspace. I went to the back yard and sat down. Nothing happened for a good 15 minutes, although I noticed none of the usual little birds fluttering about excitedly. The sound repeated and I traced it to a Cooper’s hawk about 30 feet away on a branch hanging over my neighbor’s yard.

A few days later, I felt depressed and decided I wanted to sit on the patio and wait for that creature to return. The bird wasn’t there, of course, because bird watching is like gambling. But I was disheartened to see that the branch that this hawk was also perched on had disappeared.

“Enjoy these moments,” Armstrong says. “They are becoming increasingly rare.”

Armstrong says our ecological preservation efforts are well-intentioned but also possibly misguided. “It’s not about beating your chest, grief or contrition,” she says. “It’s also a matter of ego.”

She feels that our systems of behavior need to be reconfigured in a way that is not about preserving the natural per se, but rather about treating it with the respect we give to the various man-made systems over the centuries. – to render a sacred and spiritual character. reverence to nature.

Switch off the phone

Armstrong uses an internationally known entity to illustrate his point about how we misrepresent entities over time.

“When we see the Buddha, he is depicted as sitting calmly and looking inward as if looking deep within himself,” she says. “He doesn’t look inside himself, he sends his thoughts and his heart to all corners of the world.”

She sees cultures around the world as having been constructed the same way: an absence of self in a larger environment. Some of these practices are now considered picturesque and folkloric. Armstrong’s book suggests that such communion with nature is crucial.

Armstrong remains a defender of the faith despite having been a nun who suffered physical and emotional abuse in her convent. She left that life behind not cynical about faith, but perhaps more committed to the breadth of faith.

Today, she expresses concerns about the people she has interacted with over the years, usually through her deep feeling, understanding and study of religion. She worries about her friends in Pakistan, which is dealing with catastrophic flooding.

She sees climatological events causing different crises around the world. Yet his is not a science versus religion text, the axe-crushing of the faithful repelled by abuse. Rather, she hopes to restore another kind of faith that some might consider antiquated.

“There’s no point in being worried or scared,” she says. “It’s what paralyzes us until we can’t think straight. We know we have to change our behavior in some way. We cannot continue to burn fossil fuels as we do. There must be a radical change in our way of thinking and acting.

Armstrong makes it clear that we don’t need to go back a century before technological advances. Rather, we need to look further back “before the 16th century, when Europe moved away from the natural world and developed a more pragmatic and utilitarian view of nature”.

Armstrong recognizes advances in science and medicine. But nature, she believes, should not be seen as an adversary to be defeated.

Despite the brevity of his book, Armstrong draws ideas from around the world. She believes we would all benefit from a Chinese practice of quiet sitting.

“You don’t have to take a yoga position,” she says. “Sit comfortably and turn off your phone. More and more, we see nature – those places of natural beauty – through our phones, taking one photo after another. Just 15 minutes a day, sit down and listen to the sounds of nature. Look at birds, trees and insects on the ground. Realize this. You don’t have to say a prayer or anything. Just sit with nature. And be part of it. Because we are part of it. »

]]>
Converting illegal activities from religion to the name of religion will not be tolerated: CM https://helviti.com/converting-illegal-activities-from-religion-to-the-name-of-religion-will-not-be-tolerated-cm/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 18:30:54 +0000 https://helviti.com/converting-illegal-activities-from-religion-to-the-name-of-religion-will-not-be-tolerated-cm/ Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan said that on the basis of complaints of irregularities, the EOW raided the residence of the Chairman of the Education Church Board of North India, Jabalpur, September 8. They were surprised after seeing fraud in the lease of trust institutions, non-payment of tax and 17 property documents, 48 ​​bank accounts, […]]]>

Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan said that on the basis of complaints of irregularities, the EOW raided the residence of the Chairman of the Education Church Board of North India, Jabalpur, September 8.

They were surprised after seeing fraud in the lease of trust institutions, non-payment of tax and 17 property documents, 48 ​​bank accounts, cash amount of one crore 65 lakh, 18,000,342 dollars Americans and 118 pounds, which was revealed in the descent. Eight four-wheelers were also recovered.

Large-scale irregularities and fraud came to the fore. The state government will check whether the money has been used for illegal purposes. It will also be checked whether the conversion of religion and other illegal work has been done through the trust. EOW will investigate this, the district administration will have its own role. Chief Minister Chouhan said this in a message to the media after meeting with officials regarding the action in Jabalpur.

Chief Minister Chouhan said there have also been complaints of fraud, non-payment of tax or breach of trust by changing name, irregularity in stamp duty or renewal of lease in trust institutions . All these cases are also forwarded to the EOW. The district administration will also investigate this. Conversion or other illegal activities in the name of religion will not be tolerated at any cost.

Chouhan said the conditions for granting leasehold land to the trust are set by the government. The land is leased for educational, medical work, hospital and religious purposes. There are complaints from all over the state that instead of the purpose the land was allotted for, it is being commercialized in many places. It will also be investigated statewide.

]]>